Royal Parks of London facts for kids

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Regent's Park London from 1833 Schmollinger map
Hyde Park London from 1833 Schmollinger map
Hyde Park and part of Kensington Gardens c.1833
Green Park and St. James's Park London from 1833 Schmollinger map
Green Park and St. James's Park c.1833

The Royal Parks of London are lands originally owned by the monarchy of the United Kingdom for the recreation (mostly hunting) of the royal family. They are part of the hereditary possessions of The Crown.

Parks

With increasing urbanisation of London, some of these were preserved as freely accessible open space and became public parks with the introduction of the Crown Lands Act 1851. There are today eight parks formally described by this name and they cover almost 2,000 hectares (4,900 acres) of land in Greater London.

  • Bushy Park, 445 hectares (1,100 acres)
  • Green Park, 19 hectares (47 acres)
  • Greenwich Park, 74 hectares (180 acres)
  • Hyde Park, 142 hectares (350 acres)
  • Kensington Gardens, 111 hectares (270 acres)
  • Regent's Park, 166 hectares (410 acres)
  • Richmond Park, 955 hectares (2,360 acres (9.6┬ákm2))
  • St. James's Park, 23 hectares (57 acres)

Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens (which are adjacent), Green Park, Regent's Park and St James's Park are the largest green spaces in central London. Bushy Park, Greenwich Park and Richmond Park are in the suburbs. The Royal Parks agency also manages Brompton Cemetery, Grosvenor Square Gardens, Victoria Tower Gardens and the gardens of 10, 11 and 12 Downing Street.

Hampton Court Park is also a royal park within Greater London, but, because it contains a palace, it is administered by the Historic Royal Palaces, unlike the eight Royal Parks.


Royal Parks of London Facts for Kids. Homework Help - Kiddle Encyclopedia.