Image: Megalapteryx

Original image(2,266 × 3,240 pixels, file size: 11.28 MB, MIME type: image/png)

Description: English:  In Rothschild's book 'Extinct Birds' this moa has been given the scientific name Megalapteryx huttoni. This is a jr synonym of Megalapteryx didinus, the Lesser Megalapteryx or Upland Moa. It was endemic to New Zealand. It was the last moa species to become extinct, vanishing around 1500; possibly, some isolated populations managed to persist until about the early 19th century. One-Quarter Natural Size—restored drawing from feathers and mummified remains. Plate 42
Title: Megalapteryx
Credit: Transferred from Commons. Extinct birds : an attempt to unite in one volume a short account of those birds which have become extinct in historical times : that is, within the last six or seven hundred years : to which are added a few which still exist, but are on the verge of extinction. By Lionel Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild (8 February 1868 – 27 August 1937). (http://www.archive.org/details/extinctbirdsatte00roth)
Author: George Edward Lodge
Permission: This image is in the public domain in the United States because it was first published outside the United States prior to January 1, 1923. Other jurisdictions have other rules. Also note that this image may not be in the public domain in the 9th Circuit if it was first published on or after July 1, 1909 in noncompliance with US formalities, unless the author is known to have died in 1946 or earlier (more than 70 years ago) or the work was created in 1896 or earlier (more than 120 years ago.)[1] PD-US Public domain in the United States //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Megalapteryx.png This file will not be in the public domain in its home country until January 1, 2025 and should not be transferred to Wikimedia Commons until that date, as Commons requires that images be free in the source country and in the United States.
Usage Terms: Public domain in the United States
License: PD-US
License Link: //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Megalapteryx.png

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