Government of New York facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts

The Government of the State of New York, headquartered at the New York State Capitol in Albany, New York, encompasses the administrative structure of the U.S. state of New York, as established by the New York State Constitution. Analogously to the United States federal government, it is composed of three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial. The head of the executive is the Governor, the Legislature consists of the Senate and the Assembly, and the Unified Court System consists of the Court of Appeals and lower courts. The state is also divided into counties, cities, towns, and villages, which are all municipal corporations with their own government.

Executive

The elected executive officers are:

Kathy Hochul (D)
Lieutenant Governor 
Eric Schneiderman (D)
Attorney General 
Thomas DiNapoli (D)
Comptroller 

There are several (limited to twenty) state government departments:

  • Department of Agriculture and Markets
  • Department of Audit and Control
  • Department of Civil Service
  • Department of Corrections and Community Supervision
    NYSED Building Night 2
    The State Education Building in Albany
  • Department of Economic Development
  • Education Department
  • Department of Environmental Conservation
  • Executive Department
  • Department of Family Assistance
  • Department of Financial Services
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Labor
  • Department of Law
  • Department of Mental Hygiene
  • Department of Motor Vehicles
  • Department of Public Service
  • Department of State
  • Department of Taxation and Finance
  • Department of Transportation

Regulations are promulgated and published in the New York State Register and compiled in the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations (NYCRR). There are also numerous decisions, opinions, and rulings of state agencies.

Other governments

Tribal government

Native Americans' governments are significantly independent of the state and its local governments. New York cannot interfere with tribal self-government, but may regulate conduct on tribal territory concerning non-Native Americans. For example, federal law forbids states and local authorities to tax Indian lands; however, the state can and does tax sales on tribal territory of cigarettes to non-tribe members.

Images for kids


Government of New York Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.