Advanced Photo System facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Advanced Photo System Logo
Advanced Photo System logo
KODAK Advantix APS Film
KODAK Advantix APS Film Cartridge

Advanced Photo System (APS) is a discontinued film format for still photography first produced in 1996. It was marketed by Eastman Kodak under the brand name Advantix, by FujiFilm under the name Nexia, by Agfa under the name Futura and by Konica as Centuria.

Specifics

  • It had a new way of changing film in cameras, so that the film could be "dropped in", just like people changed batteries.
  • It allowed for people to change a film, even if the entire film had not been used yet.
  • When the film was developed, it had an "index print" which showed small copies of every picture.
  • For each photo taken, special information was saved onto the film, called "metadata"
  • There were three different kinds of images, which were made by cropping (cutting) the negative. The camera always started with the largest kind, but the finished picture could change depending on what the owner wanted.
    • Panoramic
    • Classic
    • HDTV (16:9)
IX240 Cartridge
A cartridge of APS (IX240) film

The system also had problems:

  • Film size is smaller (30x16 compared to 24x36 for older cameras).
  • The final print is not as good.
  • Photography companies needed to buy new equipment, since their old equipment would not work with APS.

One famous type of camera that used this system was the Canon IXUS, which then later changed and became a digital one. The system never became popular, and was stopped in 2004. Since then, most cameras have switched to digital (electronic) systems.

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Advanced Photo System Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.