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Far Ings National Nature Reserve facts for kids

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Far Ings
Lake near Far Ings Road - geograph.org.uk - 305746.jpg
OS grid TA017233
Area 59 hectares (150 acres)
Managed by Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust
Designated: 28 July 1994
Reference #: 663

Far Ings national nature reserve is an area of over 64 ha (160 acres) on the southern shore of the Humber Estuary in North Lincolnshire, England. It is immediately west of the town of Barton-upon-Humber and the village of Barton Waterside. In addition to be designated as a national nature reserve, it is within the Humber Estuary Ramsar site, Site of Special Scientific Interest, Special Area of Conservation, and Special Protection Area.

History

The clay pits on the Humber foreshore were the focus of a tile and cement industry from 1850 to 1959. The industrial sites were abandoned in the early 20th century once supplies of clay began to run out. The clay workings filled with water and became colonised by species of reeds. The reserve was acquired by Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust in 1983, who opened it in the same year.

The site was designed as a national nature reserve in April 2005.

A tidal surge on 5 December 2013 caused by Cyclone Xaver breached the flood defences on the Humber bank, flooding the reserve. The visitor centre re-opened in August 2014.

The visitor centre, toilets, and car park were closed during the COVID-19 Pandemic in England.

Species

There are more than 250 species of moths, 230 species of wildflower, and at least 19 species of butterflies identified from Far Ings. The first Eurasian bitterns to breed in Lincolnshire in over 30 years were seen at Far Ings in 2000. A Blyth's reed warbler was spotted at the reserve in June 2020.

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