Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey facts for kids

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Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hasbrouck Heights
The Bendix Diner, a prominent landmark on Route 17
The Bendix Diner, a prominent landmark on Route 17
Map highlighting Hasbrouck Heights' location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Hasbrouck Heights' location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated July 31, 1894
Named for J. D. Hasbrouck
Area
 • Total 1.510 sq mi (3.910 km2)
 • Land 1.506 sq mi (3.899 km2)
 • Water 0.004 sq mi (0.010 km2)  0.26%
Area rank 450th of 566 in state
58th of 70 in county
Elevation 112 ft (34 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 11,842
 • Estimate (2015) 12,227
 • Rank 205th of 566 in state
27th of 70 in county
 • Density 7,865.4/sq mi (3,036.8/km2)
 • Density rank 47th of 566 in state
13th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07604
Area code(s) 201 exchanges: 288, 393, 462, 727
FIPS code 3400330420
GNIS feature ID 0885247
Website www.hasbrouck-heights.nj.us

Hasbrouck Heights (pronounced HAZ-brook /ˈhæz.bɹʊk/) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,842, reflecting an increase of 180 (+1.5%) from the 11,662 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 174 (+1.5%) from the 11,488 counted in the 1990 Census. An inner-ring suburb of New York City, Hasbrouck Heights is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Midtown Manhattan and 8 miles (13 km) west of Upper Manhattan.

Hasbrouck Heights was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on August 2, 1894, based on the passage of a referendum on July 31, 1894, and was created from portions of Lodi Township at the height of the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County. A part of the borough was annexed to Lodi in 1901.

The borough was named for J. D. Hasbrouck of the New Jersey and New York Railroad.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.510 square miles (3.910 km2), including 1.506 square miles (3.899 km2) of land and 0.004 square miles (0.010 km2) of water (0.26%) was water.

The borough borders Hackensack, Lodi, Moonachie, Teterboro and Wood-Ridge.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,255
1910 2,155 71.7%
1920 2,895 34.3%
1930 5,658 95.4%
1940 6,716 18.7%
1950 9,181 36.7%
1960 13,046 42.1%
1970 13,651 4.6%
1980 12,166 −10.9%
1990 11,488 −5.6%
2000 11,662 1.5%
2010 11,842 1.5%
Est. 2015 12,227 3.3%
Population sources:
1900-1920 1900-1910
1910-1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 11,842 people, 4,433 households, and 3,187 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,865.4 per square mile (3,036.8/km2). There were 4,627 housing units at an average density of 3,073.2 per square mile (1,186.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 81.34% (9,632) White, 2.86% (339) Black or African American, 0.08% (9) Native American, 9.99% (1,183) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 3.68% (436) from other races, and 2.04% (241) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.86% (1,760) of the population.

There were 4,433 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.1% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.22. Same-sex couples headed 9 households in 2010, less than half of the 19 counted in 2000.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,375 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,467) and the median family income was $100,264 (+/- $9,917). Males had a median income of $60,618 (+/- $5,446) versus $47,385 (+/- $6,455) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,428 (+/- $3,231). About 3.6% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 11,662 people, 4,521 households, and 3,142 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,735.0 people per square mile (2,981.9/km2). There were 4,617 housing units at an average density of 3,062.3 per square mile (1,180.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 87.87% White, 1.71% African American, 0.04% Native American, 6.65% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.19% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.27% of the population.

There were 4,521 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $64,529, and the median income for a family was $75,032. Males had a median income of $51,328 versus $40,570 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,626. About 2.1% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 36.64 miles (58.97 km) of roadways, of which 29.29 miles (47.14 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.78 miles (7.69 km) by Bergen County and 2.57 miles (4.14 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 17 and U.S. Route 46 pass through Hasbrouck Heights.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus routes 161, 163 and 164 provide service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan; the 76 line serves Newark; and local service is offered on the 709 and 780 routes.

NJ Transit provides rail service via the Pascack Valley Line's Teterboro - Williams Avenue station, which is located on the eastern boundary with Teterboro, just across the tracks from the Williams Avenue dead end in Hasbrouck Heights. Although the rail line's tracks lie entirely within the borders of Hasbrouck Heights, and in fact form the borough's eastern boundary with Teterboro, New Jersey Transit considers the station to be in Teterboro because passenger boarding, passenger shelter, parking lot, and ingress/egress roads are accessed from that municipality.

In January 2013, New Jersey Transit erected a 300-foot (91 m) chain link fence in the vicinity of the Williams Avenue dead end as a safety measure to prevent pedestrians / commuters from crossing over the tracks illegally to gain access to the trains on the Teterboro side. Hasbrouck Heights Mayor Rose Marie Heck, Assemblyman Tim Eustace, and Hasbrouck Heights commuters have tried to work with New Jersey Transit to find alternative solutions, including installation of a pedestrian rail crossing with swing gates and warning lights. New Jersey Transit has indicated there are no immediate alternatives available since funding is not available.

Teterboro Airport is located on the eastern border of Hasbrouck Heights.

Notable events

  • 1664 - Settled.
  • 1894 - Incorporated.
  • 1896 - Volunteer fire department established.
  • 1935 - (May 19) Small biplane loses altitude after taking off from Teterboro Airport, and drops directly in front of automobile on Route 2 (now Route 17). Driver of automobile only bruised after crash, pilot and student co-pilot severely injured.
  • 1966 - (June 29) Pilot James P. Scott crash-lands his Piper Aztec twin-engine plane on front lawn of Burton Avenue home after losing an engine and skimming the top of a tree, which softened his landing. The plane slid up the driveway and struck the house. The residents were not at home, and the pilot survived.
  • 1999 - (December 9) A Beechcraft Baron bound from Virginia for neighboring Teterboro Airport crashed in a backyard. All four people passengers aboard the plane died, no injuries occurred on the ground.
  • 1999 - (December 10) The Municipal Building (housing the borough hall, borough court, fire department, police department) catches fire. The cause of the blaze was found to be an electrical problem. A new building was constructed on the Boulevard and Central and dedicated on December 14, 2003.
  • 2006 - (June) The public library director Michele Reutty was in the news for not providing information to the borough police when they turned up at the library without a subpoena. This event drew widespread attention via a Slashdot article.

Images for kids


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