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Pemberton, New Jersey facts for kids

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See also: Pemberton Township, New Jersey
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Pemberton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Pemberton
Center of the borough
Center of the borough
Pemberton Borough highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pemberton Borough highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pemberton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pemberton, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 39°58′20″N 74°41′12″W / 39.97219°N 74.686558°W / 39.97219; -74.686558Coordinates: 39°58′20″N 74°41′12″W / 39.97219°N 74.686558°W / 39.97219; -74.686558
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated December 15, 1826
Government
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 0.61 sq mi (1.57 km2)
 • Land 0.59 sq mi (1.53 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.04 km2)  2.79%
Area rank 540th of 565 in state
39th of 40 in county
Elevation
36 ft (11 m)
Population
 • Total 1,409
 • Estimate 
(2019)
1,324
 • Rank 518th of 566 in state
37th of 40 in county
 • Density 2,408.7/sq mi (930.0/km2)
 • Density rank 255th of 566 in state
13th of 40 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08068
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 726, 894
FIPS code 3400557480
GNIS feature ID 0885346

Pemberton is a borough in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,409. reflecting an increase of 199 (+16.4%) from the 1,210 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 157 (-11.5%) from the 1,367 counted in the 1990 Census.

Pemberton was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 15, 1826, within portions of New Hanover Township and Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township). Pemberton became an independent borough c. 1894. The borough is named for James Pemberton, a property owner in the area.

It is a dry community, where alcohol cannot be sold, as affirmed by a referendum in 1980.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.602 square miles (1.560 km2), including 0.585 square miles (1.515 km2) of land and 0.017 square miles (0.045 km2) of water (2.88%).

Pemberton is an independent municipality within the boundaries of and completely surrounded by Pemberton Township, making it one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 797
1880 799 0.3%
1890 834 4.4%
1900 771 −7.6%
1910 797 3.4%
1920 800 0.4%
1930 783 −2.1%
1940 906 15.7%
1950 1,194 31.8%
1960 1,250 4.7%
1970 1,344 7.5%
1980 1,198 −10.9%
1990 1,367 14.1%
2000 1,210 −11.5%
2010 1,409 16.4%
2019 (est.) 1,324 −6.0%
Population sources:
1870-2000 1870-1920
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,409 people, 581 households, and 404 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,408.7 per square mile (930.0/km2). There were 642 housing units at an average density of 1,097.5 per square mile (423.7/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 74.38% (1,048) White, 15.26% (215) Black or African American, 0.21% (3) Native American, 3.26% (46) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.12% (44) from other races, and 3.76% (53) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.70% (179) of the population.

There were 581 households out of which 25.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.79.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.0% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.1 years. For every 100 females there were 90.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,568 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,899) and the median family income was $74,773 (+/- $17,679). Males had a median income of $44,750 (+/- $5,830) versus $46,406 (+/- $8,202) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,399 (+/- $6,078). About 2.8% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,210 people, 470 households, and 316 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,034.5 people per square mile (791.8/km2). There were 513 housing units at an average density of 862.6 per square mile (335.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.43% White, 12.73% African American, 0.66% Native American, 2.40% Asian, 2.73% from other races, and 3.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.60% of the population.

There were 470 households, out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.7% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 26.8% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,063, and the median income for a family was $48,500. Males had a median income of $34,911 versus $25,474 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,909. About 7.2% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 8.81 miles (14.18 km) of roadways, of which 4.99 miles (8.03 km) were maintained by the municipality and 3.82 miles (6.15 km) by Burlington County.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 317 route between Asbury Park and Philadelphia.

Education

The Pemberton Borough School District is no longer operational. Starting with the 2007–08 school year, all public school students from Pemberton Borough attend the schools of the Pemberton Township School District, with Pemberton Borough a part of the combined school district. The district is one of 31 former Abbott districts statewide, which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority. The school district serves Pemberton Borough and Pemberton Township (including the communities of Browns Mills, Country Lake Estates, Pemberton Heights and Presidential Lakes Estates and the Pemberton Township portion of Fort Dix). As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of 11 schools, had an enrollment of 4,880 students and 434.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.2:1.

Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Pemberton Early Childhood Education Center (with 465 students; in PreK), Samuel T. Busansky Elementary School (333; 3-5), Isaiah Haines Elementary School (291; K-2), Alexander Denbo Elementary School (309; 3-5), Howard L. Emmons Elementary School (288; K-2), Fort Dix Elementary School (451; PreK-5), Harker-Wylie Elementary School (284; K-2), Joseph S. Stackhouse Elementary School (283; 3-5), Marcus Newcomb Middle School (373; 6), Helen A. Fort Middle School (664; 7-8) and Pemberton Township High School (989; 9-12).

Students from Pemberton, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Pemberton include:

  • Jeff Celentano (born 1960), actor, screenwriter and director.
  • George Franklin Fort (1808–1872), 16th Governor of New Jersey.
  • John Franklin Fort (1852–1920), 33rd Governor of New Jersey, from 1908–1911.
  • Bushrod W. Lott (1826-1886), politician in the Minnesota Territory who served as United States Consul in Tehuantepec, Mexico, from 1862 to 1865, appointed by President Abraham Lincoln.
  • Rex Marshall (1919-1983), actor, television announcer and radio personality.
  • Isaac Witkin (1936-2006), sculptor.

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