Burlington County, New Jersey facts for kids

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Burlington County, New Jersey
Map
Map of New Jersey highlighting Burlington County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the USA highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded May 17, 1694
Seat Mount Holly Township
Largest City Evesham Township (population)
Washington Township (area)
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

819.84 sq mi (2,123 km²)
798.58 sq mi (2,068 km²)
21.26 sq mi (55 km²), 2.59%
Population
 - (2010)
 - Density

448,734
449,284 (2016 est.; 11th in state)
557/sq mi (215.2/km²)
Website: www.co.burlington.nj.us
Named for: Bridlington, England

Burlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The county is the largest in New Jersey by area, and its county seat is Mount Holly Township. As of the 2016 Census estimate, the county's population was 449,284, making it the state's 11th-largest county, representing a 0.1% increase from the 2010 United States Census, when the population was enumerated at 448,734, in turn an increase of 25,340 (6.0%) from the 423,394 enumerated in the 2000 Census, retaining its position as the 11th-most populous county in the state. The most-populous place was Evesham Township, with 45,538 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, while Washington Township covered 102.71 square miles (266.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality in Burlington county. The Bureau of Economic Analysis ranked the county as having the 158th-highest per capita income of all 3,113 counties in the United States (and the 11th-highest in New Jersey) as of 2009.

Burlington County is part of the Delaware Valley area, located east of the Delaware River. However, the county stretches across the state, and its southeast corner reaches tidal estuaries leading to southern New Jersey's Great Bay, which separates the county from the Atlantic Ocean.

History

Anglo-European records of Burlington County date to 1681, when its court was established in the Province of West Jersey. The county was formed on May 17, 1694, "by the union of the first and second Tenths." The county was named for Bridlington, a town in England. Burlington County was also the seat of government for the Province of West Jersey until its amalgamation with East Jersey in 1702, forming the Province of New Jersey. The county was much larger and was partitioned to form additional counties as the population increased. In 1714 one partition to the north became Hunterdon County, which itself was later partitioned to form three additional counties. The county seat had been in Burlington but, as the population increased in the interior, away from the Delaware River, a more central location was needed, and the seat of government was moved to Mount Holly in 1793.

19th Century

Increasing industrialization led to improvements in transportation which increased to profitability of agriculture in the county. Population increases in the coastal towns due to successful international trade and ship repair led to road improvemnts throughout the county.

Geography

Arneys Mount NJ
Arney's Mount as seen from Saylors Pond Road (CR 670)

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 819.84 square miles (2,123.4 km2), including 798.58 square miles (2,068.3 km2) of land (97.4%) and 21.26 square miles (55.1 km2) of water (2.6%).

Most of the land in the county is coastal and alluvial plain with little relief. There are a few anomalous hills, such as Apple Pie Hill and Arney's Mount, the highest of not only the entire county but also among the highest in South Jersey at approximately 240 feet (73 m) above sea level. The low point is sea level along the Delaware and Mullica rivers.

The majority of the land is dotted with rivers, streams, and wetlands. Some of the largest and most important rivers in Burlington County include: Rancocas Creek, Assiscunk Creek, Pennsauken Creek, Mullica River, Batsto River, and Wading River.

The county borders Atlantic County, Camden County, Mercer County, Monmouth County and Ocean County in New Jersey; and both Bucks County and Philadelphia County across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania.

Climate and weather

Weather chart for Mount Holly, New Jersey
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.5
 
41
22
 
 
2.9
 
45
24
 
 
4.4
 
53
31
 
 
4
 
64
40
 
 
4
 
74
49
 
 
4
 
82
59
 
 
4.4
 
87
64
 
 
4.9
 
85
62
 
 
4.1
 
78
54
 
 
3.8
 
67
43
 
 
3.7
 
57
35
 
 
4
 
45
27
temperatures in °F
precipitation totals in inches
source: The Weather Channel

Average temperatures in the county seat of Mount Holly have ranged from a low of 22 °F (−6 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −25 °F (−32 °C) was recorded in February 1934 and a record high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded in July 1936. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.92 inches (74 mm) in February to 4.87 inches (124 mm) in August. Burlington County has a humid-subtropical / humid continental transition climate, with relatively cold winters and hot summers. Severe weather is common in the warm months. Hurricanes have been known to strike Burlington County on occasion. Tornadoes are uncommon in the county. Severe thunderstorms, however, are quite common during the warm season. Snowfall is typical in the winter, with the snowfall averages in the county ranging from about 18 to 22 inches. The climate and weather of Burlington county is moderated by the nearby Atlantic Ocean, and rain is common year-round. The county seat receives about 41 inches of rain per year. Another interesting weather phenomena that occurs in Burlington County is radiative cooling in the Pine Barrens, a large Pine Forest and reserve that takes up a good portion of Southern and Eastern Burlington County. Due to sandy soil, on clear and dry nights these areas might be 10-15 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the surrounding areas, and there is a shorter frost-free season in these places. The sandy soil of the Pinelands loses heat much faster than the other soils or urban surfaces (concrete, asphalt) in the region, and so achieves a much lower temperature at night than the rest of the county. This effect is far less pronounced on moist, cloudy, or windy nights, as these three factors greatly reduce the radiative cooling of the sandy soil.

Climate data for {{{location}}}
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 72
(22.2)
74
(23.3)
90
(32.2)
96
(35.6)
98
(36.7)
98
(36.7)
103
(39.4)
102
(38.9)
95
(35)
87
(30.6)
78
(25.6)
73
(22.8)
103
(39.4)
Average high °F (°C) 40
(4.4)
43.5
(6.39)
52
(11.1)
63
(17.2)
73
(22.8)
81.8
(27.67)
86.5
(30.28)
84.1
(28.94)
77.1
(25.06)
66
(18.9)
55.5
(13.06)
44.2
(6.78)
63.9
(17.72)
Daily mean °F (°C) 32
(0)
34.6
(1.44)
42.5
(5.83)
52.3
(11.28)
61.8
(16.56)
71
(21.7)
75.8
(24.33)
73.6
(23.11)
66.1
(18.94)
55.1
(12.83)
46
(7.8)
36
(2.2)
53.9
(12.17)
Average low °F (°C) 24
(-4.4)
25.7
(-3.5)
32.9
(0.5)
41.6
(5.33)
50.6
(10.33)
60.1
(15.61)
65.2
(18.44)
63
(17.2)
55.1
(12.83)
44.3
(6.83)
36.5
(2.5)
27.7
(-2.39)
43.9
(6.61)
Record low °F (°C) -6
(-21.1)
-3
(-19.4)
3
(-16.1)
23
(-5)
32
(0)
43
(6.1)
50
(10)
51
(10.6)
37
(2.8)
26
(-3.3)
17
(-8.3)
2
(-16.7)
-6
(-21.1)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.89
(73.4)
2.78
(70.6)
4.42
(112.3)
3.70
(94)
4.07
(103.4)
4.46
(113.3)
4.78
(121.4)
4.68
(118.9)
4.02
(102.1)
3.26
(82.8)
3.42
(86.9)
3.73
(94.7)
46.21
(1,173.7)
Avg. precipitation days 10 11 11 12 12 11 11 11 8 11 9 12 125
Avg. snowy days 4 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 15

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 18,095
1800 21,521 18.9%
1810 24,979 16.1%
1820 28,822 15.4%
1830 31,107 7.9%
1840 32,831 * 5.5%
1850 43,203 31.6%
1860 49,730 15.1%
1870 53,639 7.9%
1880 55,402 3.3%
1890 58,528 5.6%
1900 58,241 −0.5%
1910 66,565 14.3%
1920 81,770 22.8%
1930 93,541 14.4%
1940 97,013 3.7%
1950 135,910 40.1%
1960 224,499 65.2%
1970 323,132 43.9%
1980 362,542 12.2%
1990 395,066 9.0%
2000 423,394 7.2%
2010 448,734 6.0%
Est. 2016 449,284 6.1%
Historical sources: 1790-1990
1970-2010 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 448,734 people, 166,318 households, and 117,254 families residing in the county. The population density was 561.9 per square mile (217.0/km2). There were 175,615 housing units at an average density of 219.9 per square mile (84.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the county was 73.84% (331,342) White, 16.60% (74,505) Black or African American, 0.22% (985) Native American, 4.32% (19,395) Asian, 0.05% (219) Pacific Islander, 2.05% (9,193) from other races, and 2.92% (13,095) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.42% (28,831) of the population.

There were 166,318 households out of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.3% were married couples living together, 12% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 29.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.6 males.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 423,394 people, 154,371 households, and 111,610 families residing in the county. The population density was 526 people per square mile (203/km²). There were 161,311 housing units at an average density of 200 per square mile (77/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.39% White, 15.13% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 2.69% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.48% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. 4.16% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Among those residents listing their ancestry, 21.2% of residents were of Irish, 19.1% German, 16.3% Italian, 10.8% English and 7.1% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 154,371 households out of which 34.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.70% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.70% were non-families. 22.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.20% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $58,608, and the median income for a family was $67,481. Males had a median income of $46,381 versus $32,228 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,339. About 3.2% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.5% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.

Municipalities

Burlington County, New Jersey Municipalities
Index map of Burlington County Municipalities (click to see index key)

Municipalities in Burlington County (with 2010 Census data for population, housing units and area) are:

Municipality Map key Municipal
type
Population Housing
Units
Total
Area
Water
Area
Land
Area
Pop.
Density
Housing
Density
Communities
Bass River Township 10 township 1,443 587 78.27 3.22 75.04 19.2 7.8 Charcoal Landing
Harrisville
Leektown
Martha
Merrygold
Munion Field
New Gretna
Wading River
Beverly 3 city 2,577 1,086 0.78 0.23 0.55 4,645.4 1,957.7
Bordentown 6 city 3,924 2,014 0.97 0.04 0.93 4,222.3 2,167.1
Bordentown Township 28 township 11,367 4,360 9.33 0.82 8.51 1,335.0 512.1 Bossert Estates
Dunns Mill
Burlington 4 city 9,920 4,223 3.78 0.72 3.06 3,239.1 1,378.9 East Burlington
Burlington Township 31 township 22,594 8,105 13.98 0.56 13.42 1,684.2 604.2 Deacons
Chesterfield Township 27 township 7,699 1,601 21.52 0.19 21.33 360.9 75.0 Crosswicks
Davisville
Cinnaminson Township 39 township 15,569 5,758 8.06 0.56 7.50 2,074.5 767.2 Bellview
East Riverton
Delanco Township 35 township 4,283 1,853 3.35 0.99 2.36 1,817.9 786.5
Delran Township 37 township 16,896 6,442 7.21 0.62 6.59 2,563.4 977.4 Bridgeboro
Cambridge
Fairview
Eastampton Township 23 township 6,069 2,380 5.83 0.08 5.75 1,055.6 414.0
Edgewater Park Township 34 township 8,881 3,926 3.04 0.15 2.89 3,068.8 1,356.6 Capitol Hill
Evesham Township 18 township 45,538 18,303 29.71 0.42 29.28 1,555.1 625.0 Cambridge
Cropwell
Crowfoot
Donlontown
Evans Corner
Evesboro
Marlboro
Marlton CDP (10,133)
Fieldsboro 5 borough 540 221 0.27 0.00 0.27 2,007.7 821.7
Florence Township 30 township 12,109 5,053 10.18 0.40 9.78 1,238.1 516.6 Bustleton
Florence CDP (4,426)
Roebling CDP (3,715)
Hainesport Township 20 township 6,110 2,305 6.72 0.26 6.46 945.9 356.8
Lumberton Township 21 township 12,559 4,719 13.06 0.13 12.92 971.7 365.1 Eayrestown
Fostertown
Mansfield Township 29 township 8,544 3,529 21.91 0.17 21.74 393.0 162.3 Columbus
Georgetown
Hedding
Kinkora
Maple Shade Township 40 township 19,131 9,186 3.82 0.00 3.82 5,006.1 2,403.7
Medford Township 17 township 23,033 8,652 39.93 1.01 38.92 591.8 222.3 Birchwood Lakes
Braddocks Mill
Chairville
Christopher Mills
Crossroads
Fairview
Medford Lakes 9 borough 4,146 1,543 1.29 0.13 1.16 3,569.5 1,328.4
Moorestown Township 38 township 20,726 7,862 14.92 0.23 14.69 1,410.6 535.1 Bortons Landing
Ivywood
Moorestown-Lenola CDP (14,217)
Mount Holly Township 22 township 9,536 3,861 2.85 0.05 2.81 3,397.9 1,375.8 Clermont
Mount Laurel Township 19 township 41,864 18,249 21.97 0.28 21.69 1,930.0 841.3 Birchfield
Bougher
Centerton
Colemantown
Coxs Corner
Fellowship
Hartford
Masonville
Ramblewood CDP (5,907)
Rancocas Woods
New Hanover Township 25 township 7,385 613 22.40 0.22 22.18 333.0 27.6 Cookstown
Fort Dix CDP (part; 5,951)
McGuire Air Force Base CDP (part; 737)
North Hanover Township 26 township 7,678 3,370 17.42 0.14 17.28 444.2 195.0 Arneytown
Ellisdale
Jacobstown
McGuire Air Force Base CDP (part; 2,973)
Palmyra 1 borough 7,398 3,392 2.55 0.69 1.86 3,968.4 1,819.5
Pemberton 8 borough 1,409 642 0.60 0.02 0.58 2,408.7 1,097.5
Pemberton Township 15 township 27,912 10,749 62.50 1.22 61.28 455.5 175.4 Birmingham
Browns Mills CDP (11,243)
Browns Mills Junction
Comical Corner
Country Lake Estates CDP (3,943)
Earlys Crossing
Fort Dix CDP (part; 1,765)
New Lisbon
Ong's Hat
Pemberton Heights CDP (2,423)
Presidential Lakes Estates CDP (2,365)
Riverside Township 36 township 8,079 3,147 1.61 0.12 1.49 5,425.9 2,113.5
Riverton 2 borough 2,779 1,112 0.97 0.30 0.66 4,179.4 1,672.3
Shamong Township 12 township 6,490 2,227 44.99 0.60 44.39 146.2 50.2 Atsion
Dellette
High Crossing
Southampton Township 16 township 10,464 5,024 44.22 0.56 43.67 239.6 115.1 Beaverville
Buddtown
Burrs Mill
Chairville
Crescent Heights
Ewansville
Leisuretowne CDP (3,282)
Retreat
Sandtown
Vincentown
Springfield Township 24 township 3,414 1,217 30.00 0.06 29.94 114.0 40.6 Arneys Mount
Chambers Corner
Fort Dix CDP (part)
Jacksonville
Juilustown CDP (429)
Jobstown
Tabernacle Township 13 township 6,949 2,445 49.61 0.49 49.12 141.5 49.8 Bozuretown
Eagle
Speedwell
Washington Township 11 township 687 284 102.71 3.18 99.52 6.9 2.9 Batsto
Bulltown
Crowleytown
Green Bank
Westampton Township 32 township 8,813 3,291 11.19 0.17 11.03 799.4 298.5 Rancocas
Timbuctoo
Willingboro Township 33 township 31,629 11,442 8.15 0.41 7.74 4,087.3 1,478.6 Bortons Landing
Buckingham Park
Charleston
Cooperstown
Country Club Ridge
Woodland Township 14 township 1,788 494 96.39 1.83 94.56 18.9 5.2 Bullock
Butlers Place
Chatsworth
Dukes Bridge
Johnson Place
Jones Mill
Woodmansie
Wrightstown 7 borough 802 348 1.77 0.00 1.77 453.6 196.8
Burlington County county 448,734 175,615 819.84 21.26 798.58 561.9 219.9

Most municipalities have their own municipal courts, which handle traffic and minor criminal and civil matters,. The New Jersey Superior Court handles more serious cases.

Libraries

The Burlington County Library became the first county library in New Jersey when it was established in 1921 in Mount Holly. Library service grew in popularity and several moves ensued as more space became a necessity. By 1971, a new headquarters facility had been constructed, Cinnaminson and Bordentown had joined the system as branches, and a bookmobile visited areas without local facilities. Medford and Evesham had joined the system by 1975. The Pemberton Branch joined the system in 1987. Maple Shade became a branch in April 2001 while Riverton, the newest branch, joined in December 2003. With a larger network of 9 additional member libraries, the system provides a range of services to its residents.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the county had a total of 2,609.74 miles (4,199.97 km) of roadways, of which 1,913.83 miles (3,080.01 km) were maintained by the local municipality, 504.18 miles (811.40 km) by Burlington County, 154.01 miles (247.86 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 37.72 miles (60.70 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

A variety of major routes were constructed through Burlington County. Major county roads include County Route 528, County Route 530, County Route 532, County Route 534 (only in Shamong), County Route 537, County Route 541, County Route 543, County Route 544, County Route 545 and County Route 563. State Routes that pass through are Route 38, Route 68, Route 70, Route 72, Route 73, Route 90 (only in Cinnaminson), and Route 413 (only in Burlington). U.S. Routes that traverse are U.S. Route 9 (only in Bass River Township), U.S. Route 130 and U.S. Route 206. Limited access roads include the Garden State Parkway (a 7.4 miles (11.9 km) stretch in Bass River Township), Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike (a portion of Interstate 95).

The Turnpike extends through the county for approximately 30.1 miles (48.4 km) from Cherry Hill Township in Camden County to Hamilton Township in Mercer County (including the 6.5 mile (10.5 km) Turnpike Extension from the turnpike bridge over the Delaware River to the mainline at Exit 6).

Five Turnpike interchanges are located in Burlington: Exit 4 in Mount Laurel Township, Exit 5 in Westampton Township, Exit 6A in Florence Township, Exit 6 in Mansfield Township and Exit 7 in Bordentown Township.

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority plans to widen the Parkway to three lanes in each direction from exit 80 in South Toms River, Ocean County to exit 30 in Somers Point, Atlantic County, including widening of bridges at several river crossings. The Authority extended the 'dual-dual' configuration (inner car lanes and outer car / truck / bus lanes) south to Exit 6 from its former end at Exit 8A in Monroe Township, Middlesex County. This was finished in early November 2014.

Bridges

The Burlington County Bridge Commission is responsible for maintaining the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge and the Burlington-Bristol Bridge, both of which cross the Delaware River. In addition, the agency maintains several bridges along CR 543 including the Riverside-Delanco Bridge over the Rancocas Creek.

Public transportation

The River Line is a diesel light-rail system operated for NJ Transit by the Southern New Jersey Rail Group on a former Pennsylvania Railroad line between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center and other stations in Camden, with 11 stations in the county.

NJ Transit operates bus service into Philadelphia on the following routes; 317, 406, 409, 414, and 417 routes, and into Camden, New Jersey only on the following routes; 407, 413, 418, 419, and 457; and to Atlantic City on the 559 route.

Academy Bus Lines operates buses from Mount Holly, Mount Laurel, Westampton, and Willingboro to New York City's Port Authority Bus Terminal and Midtown Manhattan, as well as the Wall Street area of Lower Manhattan.

The BurLink bus service provides six routes, under service funded by the county and operated by the South Jersey Transportation Authority, providing connections to NJ Transit's bus and rail service.


Burlington County, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.