Evesham Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Evesham Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Evesham
Thomas Hollinshead House, Marlton
Thomas Hollinshead House, Marlton
Evesham Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Evesham Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Evesham Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Evesham Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Evesham, Worcestershire or
settler Thomas Eves
Area
 • Total 29.708 sq mi (76.942 km2)
 • Land 29.284 sq mi (75.845 km2)
 • Water 0.424 sq mi (1.097 km2)  1.43%
Area rank 92nd of 566 in state
10th of 40 in county
Elevation 59 ft (18 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 45,538
 • Estimate (2015) 45,577
 • Rank 41st of 566 in state
1st of 40 in county
 • Density 1,555.1/sq mi (600.4/km2)
 • Density rank 330th of 566 in state
19th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08053 - Marlton
Area code 856
FIPS code 34-22110
GNIS ID 882082
Website www.evesham-nj.org

Evesham Township is a township in Burlington County in the US state of New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 45,538, reflecting an increase of 3,263 (+7.7%) from the 42,275 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,966 (+19.7%) from the 35,309 counted in the 1990 Census. Colloquially, the area is referred to as Marlton, the name of a community within the township.

History

The area now known as Evesham Township was originally settled by Quakers in 1672. The township was named either for the town of the same name in England or for prominent English settler Thomas Eves.

Evesham Township was formed on November 6, 1688, as Eversham (with an "R" in the middle of the name that was lost in subsequent years) in the Province of West Jersey before the county was formed. It was incorporated by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to form Washington Township (November 19, 1802), Medford Township (March 1, 1847) and Mount Laurel Township (March 7, 1872).

The Township was substantially larger than it is today, originally including what are now Mount Laurel, Medford, Lumberton, Hainesport, Shamong, and Washington Townships. The South Branch of the Rancocas on the East Side and Cropwell Creek on the West Side bound this area. Evesham Township was eventually incorporated in 1692 as one of the thirteen Townships in Burlington County. In 1802, a tract was cut off for Washington Township; in 1847, the Township was then divided in half, with the eastern half becoming Medford Township; and in 1872, Evesham was divided again, for the last time, with the northern part becoming Mount Laurel Township.

Marlton is a name commonly associated and interchangeable with the name Evesham, derived from the census-designated place within Evesham. The name Marlton came about in the early 19th century and stems from the word "marl", a naturally occurring mixture of green clay with remnants of shells that was used as a fertilizer, like manure. Its discovery helped local commerce and fueled the first "building boom", which took place in the 1830s and 1840s. Marl continued to be mined locally until 1930, when the pits were finally closed.

The Marlton area was recognized as a village in 1758. The village was named Marlton in 1845. The same year the "Evesham" Post Office and the "Evesham" Baptist Church both had their names changed to "Marlton" Post Office and the "Marlton" Baptist Church. The names remain the same today. Most maps and directional signs refer to Marlton instead of Evesham. The historic village, Olde Marlton, remains mostly intact and is a locally regulated Historic District. Full-time police services began in 1966.

Evesham remained mostly unchanged until the 1950s, when developers began buying farms and building the township's first housing developments. Today, no significant farmland remains.

In 1955, the United States Army opened the PH-32 Nike Ajax facility on Tomlinson Mill Road. This battery was one of twelve used to shield Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from aerial assault during the Cold War. The base was decommissioned in the mid-1960s and used for various functions, including a civil defense center. The site of the base is now a housing development which was built in the mid-1990s.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 29.708 square miles (76.942 km2), including 29.284 square miles (75.845 km2) of land and 0.424 square miles (1.097 km2) of water (1.43%).

Marlton is an historic community, census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated area located within Evesham Township with 10,260 residents (as of Census 2010) that covers 3.235 square miles (8.38 km2) of the township. "Marlton" is often used in place of the township's name, even when referring to locations beyond the boundaries of the CDP.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Berlin Heights, Cropwell, Crowfoot, Donlontown, Elmwood Road, Evans Corner, Evesboro, Gibbs Mill, Milford, Pine Grove and Tomlinsons Mill.

The township borders the municipalities of Mount Laurel Township and Medford Township in Burlington County and Berlin Township, Cherry Hill, Voorhees Township and Waterford Township in Camden County.

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve. Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 3,381
1810 3,445 * 1.9%
1820 3,977 15.4%
1830 4,239 6.6%
1840 5,060 19.4%
1850 3,067 * −39.4%
1860 3,145 2.5%
1870 3,351 6.6%
1880 1,602 * −52.2%
1890 1,501 −6.3%
1900 1,429 −4.8%
1910 1,408 −1.5%
1920 1,284 −8.8%
1930 1,694 31.9%
1940 1,655 −2.3%
1950 2,121 28.2%
1960 4,548 114.4%
1970 13,477 196.3%
1980 21,508 59.6%
1990 35,309 64.2%
2000 42,275 19.7%
2010 45,538 7.7%
Est. 2015 45,577 0.1%
Population sources: 1800-2000
1800-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
*= Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 45,538 people, 17,620 households, and 12,316 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,555.1 per square mile (600.4/km2). There were 18,303 housing units at an average density of 625.0 per square mile (241.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 86.98% (39,609) White, 4.19% (1,910) Black or African American, 0.12% (54) Native American, 6.16% (2,804) Asian, 0.02% (9) Pacific Islander, 0.78% (357) from other races, and 1.75% (795) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.39% (1,542) of the population.

There were 17,620 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.5 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 87.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,980 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,687) and the median family income was $104,784 (+/- $3,519). Males had a median income of $73,801 (+/- $3,907) versus $50,667 (+/- $3,039) for females. The per capita income for the township was $39,910 (+/- $1,464). About 1.5% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 42,275 people, 15,712 households, and 11,344 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,431.1 people per square mile (552.6/km²). There were 16,324 housing units at an average density of 552.6 per square mile (213.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.26% White, 3.11% African American, 0.07% Native American, 4.07% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.96% of the population.

There were 15,712 households out of which 38.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the township the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 34.8% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $67,010, and the median income for a family was $77,245. Males had a median income of $54,536 versus $36,494 for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,494. About 1.7% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 183.43 miles (295.20 km) of roadways, of which 159.35 miles (256.45 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.28 miles (24.59 km) by Burlington County and 8.80 miles (14.16 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The Marlton Circle was a traffic circle at the intersection of Route 70 and Route 73. The circle, which had handled 90,000 vehicles a day and had been the site of as many as 175 accidents a year, was completely eliminated in 2011 and replaced by a grade-separated interchange that enables Route 73 to pass over Route 70.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 406 route that runs between Berlin and Philadelphia.

The Atco station, located in Waterford Township just south of the township's border, provides New Jersey Transit train service to the 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City on the Atlantic City Line.


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