Mount Laurel, New Jersey facts for kids

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Mount Laurel, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mount Laurel
Evesham Friends Meeting House
Evesham Friends Meeting House
Mount Laurel Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mount Laurel Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mount Laurel, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mount Laurel, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 7, 1872
Area
 • Total 21.971 sq mi (56.903 km2)
 • Land 21.692 sq mi (56.181 km2)
 • Water 0.279 sq mi (0.722 km2)  1.27%
Area rank 126th of 566 in state
12th of 40 in county
Elevation 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 41,864
 • Estimate (2015) 41,842
 • Rank 48th of 566 in state
2nd of 40 in county
 • Density 1,930.0/sq mi (745.2/km2)
 • Density rank 297th of 566 in state
16th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08054
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3400549020
GNIS feature ID 0882093
Website www.mountlaurel.com

Mount Laurel is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States, and is an edge city suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 41,864, reflecting an increase of 1,643 (+4.1%) from the 40,221 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 9,951 (+32.9%) from the 30,270 counted in the 1990 Census. It is the home of NFL Films.

History

Mount Laurel was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of Evesham Township. The township was named for a hill covered with laurel trees.

There are several historical landmarks, including General Clinton's headquarters, Paulsdale, Evesham Friends Meeting House, Jacob's Chapel, Hattie Britt School and Farmer's Hall.

Mount Laurel Decision

The Mount Laurel Decision is a judicial interpretation of the New Jersey State Constitution that requires municipalities to use their zoning powers in an affirmative manner to provide a realistic opportunity for the production of housing affordable to low and moderate income households. The decision was a result of a lawsuit brought against the town by the N.A.A.C.P. that was decided by the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1975 and reaffirmed in a subsequent decision in 1983.

The history behind this, and the story leading to the Decision was highlighted in a book by David L. Kirp called Our Town.

Mount Laurel was a small, poor rural farming community until it was hit with massive suburban growth from Philadelphia in the later 1900s. Poor families, whose history had resided there for centuries, were suddenly priced out of buying additional property. In 1970, at a meeting about a proposal for affordable housing, held at an all black church in Mount Laurel, Mayor Bill Haines summed up the newcomers' perspective by saying: "If you people can't afford to live in our town, then you'll just have to leave."

Even though the poor black families in Mount Laurel were not from urban ghettos, and were not involved in gang activity, the new suburban influx thought otherwise, and significantly delayed the creation of affordable housing areas, citing concerns of gang activity and an influx of inner city criminals. Exampled comments from town meetings against forced construction of housing projects included "we need this like Custer needed more Indians"; "it's reverse discrimination"; "we lived in this in South Philly and Newark", and that the housing would be a "breeding ground for violent crime and drug abuse".

Resident advocates of the housing initiative were treated with abuse and threats. Leading advocate Ethel Lawrence, a poor black resident who lived her life in Mount Laurel, had her house repeatedly vandalized, and once her bedroom window was damaged by gunfire. Longtime white residents also tried to force the poor black residents out of town. Although the court ruled in favor of creating affordable housing, residents did manage to delay the process for decades.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.971 square miles (56.903 km2), including 21.692 square miles (56.181 km2) of land and 0.279 square miles (0.722 km2) of water (1.27%).

Ramblewood (with a 2010 Census population of 5,907) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Mount Laurel.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Birchfield, Bougher, Centerton, Colemantown, Coxs Corner, Fellowship, Hartford, Heulings Hill, Masonville, Petersburg, Pine Grove, Rancocas Woods and Texas.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,739
1890 1,699 −2.3%
1900 1,644 −3.2%
1910 1,573 −4.3%
1920 1,667 6.0%
1930 1,929 15.7%
1940 2,189 13.5%
1950 2,817 28.7%
1960 5,249 86.3%
1970 11,221 113.8%
1980 17,614 57.0%
1990 30,270 71.9%
2000 40,221 32.9%
2010 41,864 4.1%
Est. 2015 41,842 −0.1%
Population sources: 1880-2000
1880-1920 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 41,864 people, 17,538 households, and 11,294 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,930.0 per square mile (745.2/km2). There were 18,249 housing units at an average density of 841.3 per square mile (324.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 79.42% (33,249) White, 9.70% (4,061) Black or African American, 0.16% (67) Native American, 7.26% (3,040) Asian, 0.04% (17) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (418) from other races, and 2.42% (1,012) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.56% (1,907) of the population.

There were 17,538 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 29.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 87.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 83.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $84,632 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,366) and the median family income was $100,189 (+/- $4,065). Males had a median income of $75,870 (+/- $3,130) versus $54,215 (+/- $2,830) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,573 (+/- $1,416). About 3.0% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.6% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 40,221 people, 16,570 households, and 11,068 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,844.3 people per square mile (712.0/km²). There were 17,163 housing units at an average density of 787.0 per square mile (303.8/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 87.10% White, 6.92% African American, 0.09% Native American, 3.80% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.64% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.24% of the population.

There were 16,570 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.2% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.1% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.8 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $63,750, and the median income for a family was $76,288. Males had a median income of $55,597 versus $37,198 for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,245. About 2.5% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Laurelacres
Laurel Acres Park

Laurel Acres Park is known for its Veterans Memorial, fishing lake, playground, and huge grassy hill used for concerts and sledding in the winter. Laurel Acres Park is right between Church Street at Union Mill Road. The Mount Laurel Baseball League and the Mount Laurel United Soccer Club play in the park's sports fields, and since 2008, the Mount Laurel Premiership.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 170.19 miles (273.89 km) of roadways, of which 115.86 miles (186.46 km) were maintained by the municipality, 33.26 miles (53.53 km) by Burlington County and 13.55 miles (21.81 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 7.52 miles (12.10 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The New Jersey Turnpike passes through Mount Laurel Township, entering from Cherry Hill Township in the township's southwest corner and continuing for about 7.5 miles (12.1 km) to Westampton Township at Mount Laurel's northern edge. The Turnpike's James Fenimore Cooper rest area is located between Interchanges 4 and 5 northbound at milepost 39.4. Mount Laurel also hosts the toll gate for Exit 4 of the Turnpike, which provides access to Route 73.

Interstate 295 passes through the township, with three exits (Exit 36: Berlin/Tacony Bridge/Route 73, Exit 40: Moorestown/Mount Holly/Route 38, Exit 43: Delran/Rancocas Woods). Other major thoroughfares through Mount Laurel are Route 38, Route 73 and County Route 537.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Philadelphia on routes 317 (from Asbury Park), the 413 route between Camden and Burlington and the 457 route between Moorestown Mall and Camden.

The Greyhound Lines bus station at 538 Fellowship Road 39°55′55″N 74°57′27.0″W / 39.93194°N 74.9575°W / 39.93194; -74.9575 provides service to Philadelphia, New York City, Atlantic City and other points.

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