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Medford, New Jersey
Township
Township of Medford
Downtown Medford at Main Street (CR 541) and Union Street
Downtown Medford at Main Street (CR 541) and Union Street
Medford Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Medford Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Medford Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Medford Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 1, 1847
Named for Medford, Massachusetts
Area
 • Total 39.929 sq mi (103.416 km2)
 • Land 38.921 sq mi (100.804 km2)
 • Water 1.008 sq mi (2.611 km2)  2.52%
Area rank 57th of 566 in state
8th of 40 in county
Elevation 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 23,033
 • Estimate (2015) 23,414
 • Rank 108th of 566 in state
5th of 40 in county
 • Density 591.8/sq mi (228.5/km2)
 • Density rank 429th of 566 in state
27th of 40 in county"
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08055
Area code 609 exchanges: 654, 714, 953
FIPS code 3400545120
GNIS feature ID 0882083
Website www.medfordtownship.com

Medford is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 23,033, reflecting an increase of 780 (+3.5%) from the 22,253 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,727 (+8.4%) from the 20,526 counted in the 1990 Census.

Medford was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1847, from portions of Evesham Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. Portions of the township were taken to form Shamong Township (February 19, 1852), Lumberton Township (March 14, 1860) and Medford Lakes (May 17, 1939).

History

The area known as Medford was sold to Samual Coles in 1670, in all it consisted of 900 acres (3.6 km²). Within the next few years the Braddock, Prickett, Stratton, Branin, and Wilkins families moved to the area (many of whom continue to live in the area today). Upper Evesham, as it was then known, continued to grow from scattered homesteads into a small village. Many of the building and roads built between the sale of the land and the American Revolutionary War are still in existence, which include Oliphant's Mill, Christopher's Mill and the Shamong Trail (now known as Stokes Road).

In 1820, when the Post Office opened, the area was officially called Medford of Upper Evesham, using a name that had been pushed by Mark Reeve, a developer who had recently visited Medford, Massachusetts. On March 1, 1847, Medford Township was "set apart from" Evesham Township by Act of the New Jersey Legislature. The first township meeting was held at the Cross Roads (County Route 541 and Church Road) on March 9, 1847. The seat of township government remained there for several years. Part of Medford Township was taken on February 19, 1852, to form Shamong Township, on March 14, 1860, portions were taken to form Lumberton Township. The borders remained unchanged until May 17, 1939, when Medford Lakes was formed.

A thriving glass making industry developed in Medford as early as 1825 with a glass making furnace making window panes. By 1850, William Porter was operating a glass factory on a triangle of property formed by South Main Street, Mill Street, and Trimble Street. Glass making operating continued on the property throughout the 1880s under company names including Medford Glass Works and Star Glass, which at its peak employed about 250 workers and built up a "company town" of sorts with houses for owners and managers and housing for workers. A company store enabled workers to exchange scrip for food and necessities. Glassmaking operations ended around 1925 and the factory was torn down by the mid-1940s. Today, many of the nearly 30 workers' homes are neatly kept homes on Trimble and Mill Streets, as well as the owners' / managers' residence at 126 South Main St. and the company store at 132 South Main Street.

Medford's location along the Camden and Atlantic Railroad, increased trade and Medford expanded at a rapid rate in the years after the Civil War. By the 1920s the rail line had been dismantled and the mill industry was in decline, but Medford's proximity to Philadelphia and Camden County allowed the township's growth to continue as many families moved from the city and into a more rural area.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 39.929 square miles (103.416 km2), including 38.921 square miles (100.804 km2) of land and 1.008 square miles (2.611 km2) of water (2.52%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Birchwood Lakes, Christopher Mills, Crossroads, Fairview, Kirbys Mill, Medford Lakes in the Pines, Melrose, Oak Knoll, Oakanickon, Oliphants Mills, Pipers Corners, Reeves, Taunton, Taunton Lake and Wilkins.

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve. Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.

Medford Lakes is an independent municipality encircled within the boundaries of Medford Township, making it half one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another. The township borders Evesham Township (known as Marlton), Lumberton Township, Mount Laurel Township, Shamong Township, Southampton Township, Tabernacle Township in Burlington County and Waterford Township in Camden County.

The climate of Medford Township is classified as humid continental, with cold winters, hot summers, and year-round humidity. Annual precipitation for the area is 41 inches, and annual snowfall for the area is 23 inches.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 3,022
1860 2,136 * −29.3%
1870 2,189 2.5%
1880 1,980 −9.5%
1890 1,864 −5.9%
1900 1,969 5.6%
1910 1,903 −3.4%
1920 1,891 −0.6%
1930 2,021 6.9%
1940 2,237 * 10.7%
1950 2,836 26.8%
1960 4,844 70.8%
1970 8,292 71.2%
1980 17,622 112.5%
1990 20,526 16.5%
2000 22,253 8.4%
2010 23,033 3.5%
Est. 2015 23,414 1.7%
Population sources: 1850-2000
1850-1920 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 23,033 people, 8,277 households, and 6,456 families residing in the township. The population density was 591.8 per square mile (228.5/km2). There were 8,652 housing units at an average density of 222.3 per square mile (85.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 94.33% (21,726) White, 1.53% (353) Black or African American, 0.16% (36) Native American, 2.03% (467) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 0.56% (130) from other races, and 1.37% (315) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.60% (600) of the population.

There were 8,277 households out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.0% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the township, the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 20.6% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 92.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $107,883 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,728) and the median family income was $122,986 (+/- $5,037). Males had a median income of $82,169 (+/- $6,188) versus $58,324 (+/- $5,381) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,926 (+/- $2,571). About 0.8% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 22,253 people, 7,946 households, and 6,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 566.0 people per square mile (218.5/km²). There were 8,147 housing units at an average density of 207.2 per square mile (80.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.74% White, 0.76% African American, 0.12% Native American, 1.47% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.13% of the population.

There were 7,946 households out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.8% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.9% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.8% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 30.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $83,059, and the median income for a family was $97,135. Males had a median income of $69,786 versus $37,012 for females. The per capita income for the township was $38,641. About 0.9% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

  • Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge is a 170-acre nature preserve and wildlife rehabilitation center located on the southern border of Medford and is open to the public.
  • Freedom Park is a public park with extensive playground equipment, basketball and volleyball courts, bike paths, large pavilions, and large multipurpose fields including a dog run.
  • Kirby's Mill is a grist mill (flour mill) that has been added to the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Medford Canoe Trail is a recently cleared canoe trail connecting Medford Park to Kirby's Mill.
  • Historic Medford Village offer shopping, historic homes and an old-fashioned atmosphere, servingas the site of Medford's traditional Dickens Festival.
  • JCC Camps at Medford near Medford Lakes is the largest Jewish day camp in North America, operating since 1942. Part of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, the camp is accredited by the American Camp Association. It accepts children as young as four years old, and campers come from all over the tri-county area (Camden, Burlington, and Gloucester counties). Teenagers age 14 or older can join the Counselor-in-Training program to become counselors, lifeguards, or specialists. The camp offers a kosher lunch. The camp is surrounded by the many lakes of Medford, located within the New Jersey Pine Barrens. The campsite has a 4-acre (16,000 m2) lake for boating and fishing, as well as four in-ground pools for swimming. There are four playgrounds, a petting zoo and several athletic fields, including tennis and hockey courts, and a ropes course.
  • Camp Ockanickon (established in 1906), Matollionequay (established in 1937), and Stockwell (established in 1990) are three neighboring YMCA summer camps and conference centers that cover over 800 acres (320 ha) in the Pine Barrens.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 179.25 miles (288.47 km) of roadways, of which 153.27 miles (246.66 km) were maintained by the municipality, 21.85 miles (35.16 km) by Burlington County and 4.13 miles (6.65 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Major roads in Medford include Route 70, CR 532, CR 541, and CR 544.

Public transportation

NJ Transit used to provide bus service to and from Philadelphia on the 406 bus route which ended in Evesham Township but has been discontinued. Greyhound Lines provides nationwide service from nearby Mount Laurel.


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