Mount Holly, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts - Homework Help
Mount Holly, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mount Holly
Mount Holly Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mount Holly Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mount Holly Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mount Holly Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688 as Northampton
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Renamed November 6, 1931 as Mount Holly
Named for Hill covered with holly trees
Area
 • Total 2.852 sq mi (7.389 km2)
 • Land 2.806 sq mi (7.269 km2)
 • Water 0.046 sq mi (0.120 km2)  1.63%
Area rank 348th of 566 in state
31st of 40 in county
Elevation 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 9,536
 • Estimate (2015) 9,493
 • Rank 251st of 566 in state
16th of 40 in county
 • Density 3,397.9/sq mi (1,311.9/km2)
 • Density rank 191st of 566 in state
9th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08060
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3400548900
GNIS feature ID 0882104
Website twp.mountholly.nj.us

Mount Holly is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. It is the county seat of Burlington County as well as an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 9,536, reflecting a decline of 1,192 (-11.1%) from the 10,728 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 89 (+0.8%) from the 10,639 counted in the 1990 Census. Mount Holly also gives its name to the National Weather Service's Weather Forecast Office for the Philadelphia metropolitan area, though the office is actually located in adjacent Westampton.

What is now Mount Holly was originally formed as Northampton on November 6, 1688. Northampton was incorporated as one of New Jersey's first 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form Little Egg Harbor Township (February 13, 1740, now part of Ocean County), Washington Township (November 19, 1802), Pemberton borough (December 15, 1826), Coaxen Township (March 10, 1845, now known as Southampton Township), Pemberton Township (March 10, 1846), Westampton Township (March 6, 1850) and Lumberton Township (March 14, 1860). The township was renamed Mount Holly as of November 6, 1931, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier. The township was named for hills covered with holly trees.

History

Colonial era

The first European settlement in what is now Mount Holly began in 1677, when Walter Reeves acquired land from the Lenape (Delaware) Native Americans living in the area. He constructed a dam on Rancocas Creek to channel water through a raceway to power a grist mill and saw mill. Edward Gaskill and his sons hand dug the mill race on their property between 1720 and 1723. After the mills were established, more settlers were attracted to the area and built houses and commercial buildings on High, Church, White, Mill, and Pine streets, including the Shinn Curtis Log House (1712). By 1800, over 250 dwellings had been built.

Today no mills remain on the raceway, which still flows in its original course from the Rancocas just above the dam. The raceway proved a way for herring to make their way above the dam and was the scene of an annual fish run in the spring which provided fresh herring for slating and eating. The former mill land has been preserved as the Mill Dam Park. It marks the importance of mills to the early settlements.

Revolutionary War era

On December 17, 1776, Colonel Samuel Griffin of the Continental Army crossed the Delaware River with 600 men — mostly untrained men and boys, and with little equipment — and marched to Mount Holly, where he set up a few "3-pounder" artillery pieces on Iron Works Hill. Hessian commanders von Block and Carl von Donop, were told that there were 3,000 American troops at Mount Holly.

By December 23, 1776, 2,000 Hessians were moved from Bordentown and positioned at The Mount in Mount Holly, where they engaged in a three-day-long artillery exchange, known as the Battle of Iron Works Hill or Battle of Mount Holly, with the Americans on Iron Works Hill. The Americans slipped away that night.

After George Washington crossed the Delaware River on December 25, 1776, the fact that thousands of Hessian troops had been drawn to Mount Holly aided in the Continental Army's success in the Battle of Trenton the next day, a surprising American victory that helped turn the Army's fading morale after the disastrous defeat at the Battle of Fort Washington just weeks before and the ignominious retreat through New Jersey.

19th century

Burlington County Prison, 128 High Street, Mount Holly (Burlington County, New Jersey)
Burlington County Prison in Mount Holly, New Jersey. Photo circa 1938.

The 1793 state legislature approved the relocation of the Burlington County seat from Burlington City to Mount Holly, which was approved by voters in a 1796 referendum. Several important municipal buildings were constructed, including the courthouse in 1796 and the county prison built circa 1819. The Burlington County Prison was designed by Robert Mills, a nationally known architect who designed the Washington Monument. The town has numerous 18th and 19th-century buildings, most of which are included in the Mount Holly Historic District; it is listed in the New Jersey and National Register of Historic Places. Commercial buildings were constructed primarily along High Street.

In 1849, the Burlington and Mount Holly Railroad was established, connecting communities along the Delaware River to Philadelphia, the major city of the area. The railroad supported industrialization along its route. The Camden and Mount Holly Railroad constructed a station 20 years later near the intersection of Washington and King streets.

20th century

A trolley station was built in 1904 for the passengers making connections to Burlington City and Moorestown. New municipal buildings were constructed during the 20th century, including the Town Hall on Washington Street (1930) and the U.S. Post Office (1935) located across the street (1935), both federally funded and constructed as Works Progress Administration projects under President Franklin D. Roosevelt during the Great Depression.

In the late 1950s, Mount Holly began to have economic difficulties due to industrial restructuring and the loss of working-class jobs. In the post-World War II period, numerous blue collar, family wage jobs disappeared as the community's traditional employers, the mills and dye factories, were shut down. At first these job losses were offset in part by gains at the nearby military bases, Fort Dix and McGuire Air Force Base, especially during the Vietnam War. In 1970, the residential vacancy rate in Mount Holly was 4.3%.

By 1980, however, the vacancy rate had climbed to 8.7% as a result of the nearby military installations' downsizing after the end of the Vietnam War. During this same period, 1970–1980, shopping malls proliferated in the suburban Philadelphia area, and retail business in Mount Holly suffered. Mount Holly received Urban Enterprise Zone (UEZ) status in 1995; it has provided tax incentives and other assistance programs to local businesses, including lowering the sales tax rate to 3½, half of the prevailing rate charges statewide. This has helped to revive the local small business base.

Geography

Mount Holly had a total area of 2.852 square miles (7.389 km2), including 2.806 square miles (7.269 km2) of land and 0.046 square miles (0.120 km2) of water (1.63%).

The township borders Eastampton Township, Hainesport Township, Lumberton Township, and Westampton Township.

Clermont is an unincorporated community located within Mount Holly Township.

Climate

Climate data for South Jersey Regional Airport, NJ, US
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 40
(4.4)
43.5
(6.39)
52
(11.1)
63
(17.2)
73
(22.8)
81.8
(27.67)
86.5
(30.28)
84.1
(28.94)
77.1
(25.06)
66
(18.9)
55.5
(13.06)
44.2
(6.78)
63.9
(17.72)
Daily mean °F (°C) 32
(0)
34.6
(1.44)
42.5
(5.83)
52.3
(11.28)
61.8
(16.56)
71
(21.7)
75.8
(24.33)
73.6
(23.11)
66.1
(18.94)
55.1
(12.83)
46
(7.8)
36
(2.2)
53.9
(12.17)
Average low °F (°C) 24
(-4.4)
25.7
(-3.5)
32.9
(0.5)
41.6
(5.33)
50.6
(10.33)
60.1
(15.61)
65.2
(18.44)
63
(17.2)
55.1
(12.83)
44.3
(6.83)
36.5
(2.5)
27.7
(-2.39)
43.9
(6.61)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.89
(73.4)
2.78
(70.6)
4.42
(112.3)
3.70
(94)
4.07
(103.4)
4.46
(113.3)
4.78
(121.4)
4.68
(118.9)
4.02
(102.1)
3.26
(82.8)
3.42
(86.9)
3.73
(94.7)
46.21
(1,173.7)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 3,559
1810 4,171 * 17.2%
1820 4,833 15.9%
1830 5,516 * 14.1%
1840 6,813 23.5%
1850 3,031 * −55.5%
1860 3,322 9.6%
1870 4,018 * 21.0%
1880 4,630 15.2%
1890 5,376 16.1%
1900 5,168 −3.9%
1910 5,652 9.4%
1920 5,901 4.4%
1930 6,573 11.4%
1940 6,892 4.9%
1950 8,206 19.1%
1960 13,271 61.7%
1970 12,713 −4.2%
1980 10,818 −14.9%
1990 10,639 −1.7%
2000 10,728 0.8%
2010 9,536 −11.1%
Est. 2015 9,493 −0.5%
Population sources: 1800-2000
1800-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 9,536 people, 3,456 households, and 2,264 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,397.9 per square mile (1,311.9/km2). There were 3,861 housing units at an average density of 1,375.8 per square mile (531.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 65.57% (6,253) White, 23.10% (2,203) Black or African American, 0.37% (35) Native American, 1.47% (140) Asian, 0.07% (7) Pacific Islander, 4.29% (409) from other races, and 5.13% (489) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.69% (1,210) of the population.

There were 3,456 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.6% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.3 years. For every 100 females there were 102.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 100.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,841 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,427) and the median family income was $68,500 (+/- $4,684). Males had a median income of $51,945 (+/- $5,141) versus $37,079 (+/- $5,759) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,551 (+/- $1,785). About 7.1% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,728 people, 3,903 households, and 2,583 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,750.8 people per square mile (1,448.3/km²). There were 4,248 housing units at an average density of 1,485.2 per square mile (573.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 68.68% White, 21.57% African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.37% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 4.77% from other races, and 3.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.78% of the population.

There were 3,903 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.0% were married couples living together, 17.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.3% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $43,284, and the median income for a family was $52,000. Males had a median income of $38,186 versus $27,425 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,672. About 6.8% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 38.43 miles (61.85 km) of roadways, of which 29.11 miles (46.85 km) were maintained by the municipality, 8.45 miles (13.60 km) by Burlington County and 0.87 miles (1.40 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Mount Holly is accessible at exit 5 of the New Jersey Turnpike via County Route 541.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on routes 317 (from Asbury Park) and 409/417/418 (from Trenton), with local service available on the 413 route between Camden and Burlington.

Points of interest

Thomas Shinn Home Mount Holly
Thomas Shinn Home, 1712
  • Mount Holly Cemetery
  • Shinn Curtis Log House, constructed out of hand-hewn logs, the house was built in 1712; the original log house was uncovered in 1967. A larger house that had been built around it was demolished, revealing the early house beneath, which has been restored.
  • Burlington County Prison, opened in 1819, it was the oldest continually operated prison in the country when it closed in 1965 after more than 150 years of service.
  • Old Courthouse Complex, designed by Samuel Lewis and constructed in 1796.
  • First Presbyterian Church
  • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
  • Friends Meeting House
  • Brainerd Schoolhouse is a one-room schoolhouse that was constructed in 1759 and operated as a school for nearly 100 years. In 1951, the school was transferred from the Female Benevolent Society, which had owned and operated the site for 136 years, to the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America.
  • Relief Fire Company No. 1, home of the oldest continuously operating volunteer fire company in the United States.
  • Thomas Budd House is the township's third-oldest house, dating to 1744.
  • Stephen Girard House was the home of Girard, who moved to Mount Holly shortly after his marriage in 1777 and purchased the partially completed house, as recorded in 1779.
  • John Woolman Memorial was constructed in the late 1700s on a portion of an orchard that had belonged to Woolman.

Mount Holly, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Homework Help - Kiddle Encyclopedia.