Moorestown, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
For other places with similar names, see Morristown, New Jersey (disambiguation).
Moorestown, New Jersey
Township
Township of Moorestown
Smith Mansion
Smith Mansion
Moorestown Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Moorestown Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Moorestown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Moorestown, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Founded 1682
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Area
 • Total 14.918 sq mi (38.638 km2)
 • Land 14.693 sq mi (38.055 km2)
 • Water 0.225 sq mi (0.583 km2)  1.51%
Area rank 176th of 566 in state
16th of 40 in county
Elevation 69 ft (21 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 20,726
 • Estimate (2015) 20,564
 • Rank 125th of 566 in state
7th of 40 in county
 • Density 1,410.6/sq mi (544.6/km2)
 • Density rank 343rd of 566 in state
20th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08057
Area code(s) 609 and 856
FIPS code 3400547880
GNIS feature ID 0882095
Website www.moorestown.nj.us

Moorestown is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States and an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,726, reflecting an increase of 1,709 (+9.0%) from the 19,017 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,901 (+18.0%) from the 16,116 counted in the 1990 Census.

Moorestown was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1922, from portions of Chester Township (now Maple Shade Township), based on the results of a referendum held on April 25, 1922. The township is named for a Thomas Moore who settled in the area in 1722 and constructed a hotel though other sources attribute the name to poet Thomas Moore.

The township banned all liquor sales in 1915 and retained the restrictions after Prohibition ended in 1933. Referenda aiming to repeal the ban failed in both 1935 and 1953. In 2007, the Township Council approved a referendum that would allow the sale by auction of six liquor licenses (the state limit of one per every 3,000 residents), with estimates that each license could sell over $1 million each. The referendum did not receive enough votes to pass. In 2011, voters repealed the liquor ban; however, liquor sales in the township will be restricted to the Moorestown Mall.

In 2005 Moorestown was ranked number one in Money magazine's list of the 100 best places to live in America. The magazine screened over a thousand small towns and created a list of the top 100 for its August 2005 issue, in which Moorestown earned the top spot because of its community feeling, in addition to plentiful jobs within the commuting area, excellent schools, low crime rate, and affordable housing. Another attribute is its proximity to Philadelphia (about a 25-minute commute), a center of jobs and cultural and urban amenities.

History

Roberts Monument b
Roberts Monument
All are welcome
Friends Meeting House
Breidenhart (5)
Breidenhart was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Main Street (formerly the King's Highway) follows a ridge that had been occupied by the historic Lenni Lenape Native Americans. Two fine springs, one to the west (off Main Street before reaching the Perkins Center for the Arts, just by Roberts Elementary School) and one to the east (off North Stanwick Road) drew Native Americans and traders to the area.

In 1682, John and Sarah Roberts became the first English-speaking residents of Moorestown when they began to live in their home where the Roberts Monument is presently located on County Route 537 at the intersection with Route 73. In May 1686, three years after the founding of Philadelphia, John Rodman bought 500 acres (2.0 km2) on the west side of Chester Township, and Thomas Rodman bought 533 acres (2.2 km2) in the same area; this soon became known as the Village of Rodmantown. The growing area around the eastern spring was known as the Village of Chestertown.

In 1700, the first Society of Friends' Meeting House, built of logs, was erected on the King's Highway. Originally known as Meeting House Lane, Chester Avenue was laid out in 1720. The community at that time probably consisted of a few farmhouses along the King's Highway from Stanwick Road to Locust Street.

Thomas Moore and his wife Elizabeth settled here in 1722. In 1732, Moore purchased 33 acres (130,000 m2) of land on the north side of the King's Highway. The land ran from the west side of the Friends' graveyard on the northwest corner of the King's Highway and Meeting House Lane on the east, and west to Locust Street on the western boundary of his property and north to Second Street. Moore set up a hotel on the northwest corner of the King's Highway and Union streets (Cornerstone Bank and the Wawa now occupy opposite corners there). Given Moore's extensive property ownership, the name Moorestown gradually replaced Chester informally in the center of town. Finally, Moorestown formerly split off from Chester and became a Township.

The Coles Hotel, east of the corner of Main and Chester, was a stop on the stagecoach route connecting Camden with Trenton and Philadelphia. Construction of the railroad in 1867 superseded the stagecoaches and connected Mount Holly Township and Camden.

A tavern built in 1745 by John Cox at what is now Main and Schooley streets was taken over in 1778 during the Revolutionary War by Hessian officers retreating from Philadelphia. In the years after the war, it was used for a town hall before 1812, when what is now called "Old Town Hall" was constructed.

A house constructed in 1742 by John Cowperthwaite at King's Highway and Lenola Road is listed in the Library of Congress with details of the house recorded in 1937 by the Historic American Buildings Survey of the United States Department of the Interior.

Quakers built Moorestown's first two schools in 1785. A brick schoolhouse was located near what is now the intersection of Route 73 and the Kings Highway overpass. A stone schoolhouse was located adjacent to the present Friends Meeting House at the intersection of Chester Avenue and Main Street. The first district school was opened in 1810. The first free Moorestown public school was established in 1873.

Vernon Hill's 46,000 square feet (4,300 m2) mansion Villa Collina — Italian for "Hill House" — the largest private residence in New Jersey, is located in Moorestown.

Moorestown's Quaker heritage is discussed in Moorestown resident and native historian William H. Kingston's book, Moorestown's Third Century: The Quaker Legacy.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 14.918 square miles (38.638 km2) including 14.693 square miles (38.055 km2) of land and 0.225 square miles (0.583 km2) of water (1.51%).

The township is located in southwest Burlington County and borders Maple Shade Township to the south, Cinnaminson Township and Delran Township to the west, Willingboro Township on the north and Mount Laurel Township to the east. Moorestown Township is approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of Philadelphia.

Moorestown-Lenola is an unincorporated community and census-designated place located within Moorestown, which had a 2010 population of 14,217.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bortons Landing, North Bend, Stanwick and West Moorestown.

Climate

The climate in the Moorestown area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Moorestown Township has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 7,247
1940 7,749 6.9%
1950 9,123 17.7%
1960 12,497 37.0%
1970 15,577 24.6%
1980 15,596 0.1%
1990 16,116 3.3%
2000 19,017 18.0%
2010 20,726 9.0%
Est. 2015 20,564 −0.8%
Population sources:
1930-2000 1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 20,726 people, 7,450 households, and 5,625 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,410.6 per square mile (544.6/km2). There were 7,862 housing units at an average density of 535.1 per square mile (206.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 84.50% (17,513) White, 6.42% (1,331) Black or African American, 0.09% (18) Native American, 6.00% (1,244) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.81% (168) from other races, and 2.16% (447) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.48% (721) of the population.

There were 7,450 households out of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.5% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the township, the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 19.0% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.4 years. For every 100 females there were 91.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 86.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $108,655 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,347) and the median family income was $129,217 (+/- $6,334). Males had a median income of $100,266 (+/- $4,901) versus $60,057 (+/- $11,139) for females. The per capita income for the township was $58,458 (+/- $3,172). About 1.4% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

At the 2000 United States Census there were 19,017 people, 6,971 households, and 5,270 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,287.3 per square mile (497.1/km²). There were 7,211 housing units at an average density of 488.1 per square mile (188.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 89.19% White, 5.69% African American, 0.16% Native American, 3.27% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.75% of the population.

There were 6,971 households of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.3% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.13.

Age distribution was 27.4% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.9 males.

The median household income was $78,826, and the median family income was $94,844. Males had a median income of $74,773 versus $39,148 for females. The per capita income for the township was $42,154. About 2.4% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 123.52 miles (198.79 km) of roadways, of which 96.15 miles (154.74 km) were maintained by the municipality, 24.65 miles (39.67 km) by Burlington County and 2.72 miles (4.38 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on routes 317 (from Asbury Park), and during rush hours weekdays, on the 414. Other buses such as the 407, 413 and 457 run between the Moorestown Mall and the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, from which there are connecting buses into Philadelphia and a station on the PATCO High Speed Line with service between Center City Philadelphia and Lindenwold, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2012. Burlington County provides rush hour public transit van service on the Burlink B9 route on weekdays from the Palmyra River LINE station to the Moorestown Mall and some intermediate points.

Moorestown does not have its own train station, though the original plan of the PATCO line had a train stopping in Moorestown. Residents can drive to train stations in the nearby communities of Haddonfield and Lindenwold, for access to the PATCO Speedline and to Palmyra for NJ Transit's River Line service which connects to New York Penn Station through Trenton. NJ Transit Rail Operations still owns the single-track railway in the township, running from Pennsauken Township to Mount Holly, as a rail trail.

Transportation of "Miracle on the Hudson" US Airways Flight 1549

On June 5, 2011, J. Supor & Son transported the fuselage of US Airways Flight 1549 through Moorestown en route to the Carolinas Aviation Museum in Charlotte North Carolina. The convoy spent over 1.5 hours working to negotiate a single right turn in the center of the town. This was the most difficult maneuver on the entire seven-day, 788-mile journey. The difficulty of this one turn was known in advance. In order to negotiate the turn the team had to temporarily remove a street light and the corner of a grave yard fence.

Moorestown in fiction

  • The song "Moorestown" by Sun Kil Moon is set in Moorestown.

Images for kids


Moorestown, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.