Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Cinnaminson
Motto: "Building Our Future... Together"
Cinnaminson Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Cinnaminson Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 15, 1860
Area
 • Total 8.061 sq mi (20.876 km2)
 • Land 7.505 sq mi (19.437 km2)
 • Water 0.556 sq mi (1.439 km2)  6.89%
Area rank 232nd of 566 in state
23rd of 40 in county
Elevation 79 ft (24 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 15,569
 • Estimate (2015) 16,651
 • Rank 162nd of 566 in state
10th of 40 in county
 • Density 2,074.5/sq mi (801.0/km2)
 • Density rank 288th of 566 in state
14th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08077
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 303, 786, 829
FIPS code 3400512940
GNIS feature ID 0882096
Website www.cinnaminsonnj.org

Cinnaminson Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. Cinnaminson Township borders the Delaware River, and is an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 15,569, reflecting an increase of 974 (+6.7%) from the 14,595 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 12 (+0.1%) from the 14,583 counted in the 1990 Census.

Cinnaminson was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 15, 1860, from portions of Chester Township (now known as Maple Shade Township and having no connection to the Morris County community that still bears that name). Portions of the township were taken to form Delran Township (February 12, 1880), Riverton (December 18, 1893) and Palmyra (April 19, 1894).

History

Cinnaminson was formed by resolution in 1860 from a section of Chester Township. Part of this resolution reads, "The inhabitants of the township of Chester having become so numerous that it is impracticable for them to meet with convenience and good order in one assembly... the Township shall be divided."

The name "Cinnaminson" is said to derive from the Lenape Native American word "Senamensing," which means "sweet water". Alternatively, the name may derive from Native American words meaning "stone island".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 8.061 square miles including (20.876 km2), including 7.505 square miles (19.437 km2) of land and 0.556 square miles (1.439 km2) of water (6.89%).

The township borders Delran Township, Maple Shade Township, Moorestown Township, Palmyra and Riverton in Burlington County; Pennsauken Township in Camden County; and Philadelphia across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania.

Cinnaminson includes within its boundaries the confluence point of longitude 75 degrees west and latitude 40 degrees north, one of only four such confluence points in New Jersey. The intersection point is on the 4th fairway of the Riverton Country Club Golf Course, less than ½ mile from the Municipal Building.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bellview, East Riverton, New Albany, North Pennsville, Parry, Taylor and Wrightsville.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 2,701
1870 3,112 15.2%
1880 2,184 * −29.8%
1890 2,891 32.4%
1900 1,078 * −62.7%
1910 1,266 17.4%
1920 1,587 25.4%
1930 2,277 43.5%
1940 2,504 10.0%
1950 3,144 25.6%
1960 8,302 164.1%
1970 16,962 104.3%
1980 16,072 −5.2%
1990 14,583 −9.3%
2000 14,595 0.1%
2010 15,569 6.7%
Est. 2015 16,651 6.9%
Population sources:
1860-2000 1860-1920
1860-1870 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 15,569 people, 5,535 households, and 4,351 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,074.5 per square mile (801.0/km2). There were 5,758 housing units at an average density of 767.2 per square mile (296.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 89.48% (13,931) White, 5.49% (855) Black or African American, 0.08% (13) Native American, 2.38% (370) Asian, 0.02% (3) Pacific Islander, 0.98% (153) from other races, and 1.57% (244) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.07% (478) of the population.

There were 5,535 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.4% were non-families. 18.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.5 years. For every 100 females there were 96.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,470 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,827) and the median family income was $98,579 (+/- $6,301). Males had a median income of $70,565 (+/- $7,423) versus $47,340 (+/- $3,291) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,104 (+/- $2,329). About 3.9% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 14,595 people, 5,057 households, and 4,141 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,920.4 people per square mile (741.5/km²). There were 5,147 housing units at an average density of 677.3 per square mile (261.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.36% White, 5.08% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.88% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.

There were 5,057 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.5% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.1% were non-families. 15.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the township the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 19.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $68,474, and the median income for a family was $75,920. Males had a median income of $57,122 versus $41,286 for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,863. About 1.4% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 80.63 miles (129.76 km) of roadways, of which 67.47 miles (108.58 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.29 miles (14.95 km) by Burlington County and 3.87 miles (6.23 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Roads traveling through the township include Route 73, Route 90, U.S. Route 130, and County Route 543.

Public transportation

The Cinnaminson station located on Broad Street offers southbound service on the River Line light rail system to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (with transfers available to the PATCO Speedline) and northbound service to the Trenton Transit Center with connections to NJ Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Amtrak trains.

NJ Transit provides bus service on the 409 and 417 route between Trenton and Philadelphia, and on the 419 route between Camden and Burlington.

BurLink bus service is offered on the B9 route (between the Palmyra station and the Moorestown Mall) and the B10 route (between Cinnaminson station and Route 130 / Union Landing Road).

Community

Since 1900, Cinnaminson has been home to the Riverton Country Club, a country club and golf course designed by Donald Ross.

Cinnaminson is home to the Burlington County Footlighters, a production company founded in 1938 who perform regularly at a playhouse within the township. Additionally, Cinnaminson facilitates an all-ages regional chorus and wind ensemble.


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