Pennsauken Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pennsauken
Burrough-Dover House
Burrough-Dover House
Motto: A Great Place to Grow, Dream and Prosper!
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Pennsauken Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pennsauken Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated February 18, 1892
Area
 • Total 12.082 sq mi (31.291 km2)
 • Land 10.435 sq mi (27.027 km2)
 • Water 1.647 sq mi (4.264 km2)  13.63%
Area rank 192nd of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county
Elevation 89 ft (27 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 35,885
 • Estimate (2015) 35,628
 • Rank 65th of 566 in state
5th of 37 in county
 • Density 3,438.9/sq mi (1,327.8/km2)
 • Density rank 187th of 566 in state
23rd of 37 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC−4)
ZIP codes 08109-08110
Area code 856
FIPS code 3400757660
GNIS feature ID 0882157
Website www.twp.pennsauken.nj.us

Pennsauken Township is a township in Camden County, in the US state of New Jersey, and a suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 35,885, reflecting an increase of 148 (+0.4%) from the 35,737 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 999 (+2.9%) from the 34,738 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Pennsauken Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 18, 1892, from portions of the now-defunct Stockton Township.

The exact origin of the name Pennsauken is unclear, but it probably derives from the language of the Lenni Lenape people (a Native American group which once occupied the area) from "Pindasenauken", the Lenape language term for "tobacco pouch". Alternatively, the "Penn" in the township's name refers to William Penn, while "sauk" is a water inlet or outlet.

Pennsauken was home to America's first drive-in movie theater, created in 1933 with the opening of the Camden Drive-In in Pennsauken. It featured the comedy Wives Beware, released in the theaters as Two White Arms.

For 50 years, the township was the home to the Pennsauken Mart, a large multi-vendor indoor market, which was closed in January 2006 to make way for a sports arena/conference complex. Most of the vendors moved to the Grand Market Place in Willingboro Township.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 12.082 square miles (31.291 km2), including 10.435 square miles (27.027 km2) of land and 1.647 square miles (4.264 km2) of water (13.63%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Amon Heights, Bethel, Biedemon, Delair, Delair Station, Delaware Gardens, Dudley, East Pennsauken, Fish House, Hillcrest, Homesteadville, Jordantown, Merchantville Park, Morris, Morrisville, North Pennsville and Wellwood.

The township includes Petty's Island, a 392-acre (1.59 km2) island in the Delaware River although most of the island actually sits across a narrow strait from neighboring Camden. Once an oil storage and distribution facility, the island is now the site of a container cargo shipping operation and nesting bald eagles. Petty's Island is currently the focal point of the township's waterfront redevelopment plan.

Pennsauken borders Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The two municipalities are connected across the Delaware River by the Betsy Ross Bridge which is owned and operated by the Delaware River Port Authority. In New Jersey, Pennsauken borders Camden, Cherry Hill, Collingswood and Merchantville in Camden County, and Cinnaminson Township, Maple Shade Township and Palmyra in Burlington County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 3,145
1910 4,169 32.6%
1920 6,474 55.3%
1930 16,915 161.3%
1940 17,745 4.9%
1950 22,767 28.3%
1960 33,771 48.3%
1970 36,394 7.8%
1980 33,775 −7.2%
1990 34,738 2.9%
2000 35,737 2.9%
2010 35,885 0.4%
Est. 2015 35,628 −0.7%
Population sources:
1900–2000 1900–1920
1900–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 35,885 people, 12,633 households, and 8,995 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,438.9 per square mile (1,327.8/km2). There were 13,275 housing units at an average density of 1,272.2 per square mile (491.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 47.60% (17,081) White, 26.87% (9,644) Black or African American, 0.59% (210) Native American, 7.72% (2,770) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 13.59% (4,877) from other races, and 3.59% (1,288) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 26.91% (9,657) of the population.

There were 12,633 households out of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 18.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.8% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.36.

In the township, the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.0 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 87.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,241 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,957) and the median family income was $65,910 (+/- $3,272). Males had a median income of $47,651 (+/- $3,101) versus $39,229 (+/- $2,035) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,048 (+/- $1,438). About 6.4% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.4% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 35,737 people, 12,389 households, and 9,093 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,392.4 people per square mile (1,310.4/km2). There were 12,945 housing units at an average density of 1,228.8 per square mile (474.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 60.10% White, 24.18% African American, 0.35% Native American, 4.58% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 8.27% from other races, and 2.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.34% of the population.

There were 12,389 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 16.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 27.5% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $47,538, and the median income for a family was $52,760. Males had a median income of $37,652 versus $30,100 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,004. About 6.1% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Pennsauken Transit Center - commuter platform
Pennsauken Transit Center

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 144.85 miles (233.11 km) of roadways, of which 105.82 miles (170.30 km) were maintained by the municipality, 26.76 miles (43.07 km) by Camden County, 10.27 miles (16.53 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.00 miles (3.22 km) by the Delaware River Port Authority.

Major roads through the township include Route 130, the largest highway through the township, which also intersects with Route 73 in the northern part of the township, near the Cinnaminson Township border. Route 90 is a short highway leading to the Betsy Ross Bridge, which connects the township with Philadelphia. Owned and operated by the Delaware River Port Authority, the bridge stretches 8,500 feet (2,600 m) between abutments and opened to traffic on April 30, 1976. Routes 38 and 70 also merge westbound in the eastern part of the township near the Cherry Hill border.

CR 537 passes through in the south while CR 543 travels through in the north.

Public transportation

The township hosts two NJ Transit rail stops. The Pennsauken-Route 73 station on the River Line offers service between Trenton and Camden. The Pennsauken Transit Center on River Road features a transfer between the River Line and the Atlantic City Line, which provides rail service between Atlantic City and Philadelphia. The station was constructed at a cost of $40 million and opened for commuters in October 2013.

NJ Transit bus service between the township and Philadelphia is available on the 317, 404, 406, and 409 routes, with local service available on the 452 route.


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