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Haddon Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Haddon
Newton Union Schoolhouse
Motto(s): 
Where community thrives
Haddon Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in New Jersey.
Haddon Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Haddon Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Haddon Township, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 39°54′22″N 75°03′47″W / 39.906°N 75.063°W / 39.906; -75.063Coordinates: 39°54′22″N 75°03′47″W / 39.906°N 75.063°W / 39.906; -75.063
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Settled 1681
Incorporated February 23, 1865
Named for Elizabeth Haddon
Government
 • Type Walsh Act
 • Body Board of Commissioners
Area
 • Total 2.82 sq mi (7.30 km2)
 • Land 2.69 sq mi (6.97 km2)
 • Water 0.13 sq mi (0.33 km2)  4.54%
Area rank 352nd of 565 in state
14th of 37 in county
Elevation
20 ft (6 m)
Population
 • Total 14,707
 • Estimate 
(2019)
14,541
 • Rank 171st of 566 in state
8th of 37 in county
 • Density 5,472.6/sq mi (2,113.0/km2)
 • Density rank 97th of 566 in state
8th of 37 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
08104, 08107, 08108, 08033, 08059
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3400728740
GNIS feature ID 0882156

Haddon Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 14,707, reflecting an increase of 56 (+0.4%) from the 14,651 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 186 (-1.3%) from the 14,837 counted in the 1990 Census.

Under the terms of an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 23, 1865, Haddon Township was incorporated from portions of Newton Township. The following communities were subsequently created from the Haddon Township: Haddonfield (April 6, 1875), Collingswood (May 22, 1888), Woodlynne (March 19, 1901), Haddon Heights (March 2, 1904), Audubon (March 13, 1905) and Oaklyn (also March 13, 1905). The township was named for early settler Elizabeth Haddon.

Haddon Township allows the sale of alcohol, and has several bars and restaurants which serve alcoholic beverages, unlike the neighboring boroughs of Collingswood, Haddonfield and Haddon Heights which prohibit the sale of alcohol.

History

In 1701, Elizabeth Haddon Estaugh, the daughter of John Haddon, arrived in the American colonies to oversee his large landholdings, which included areas that are now Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Haddonfield. Contemporary Newton Township included land that later became part of Audubon, Audubon Park, Camden, Collingswood, Gloucester City, Haddon Heights, Haddonfield, Oaklyn, and Woodlynne. Its first European settlers were Irish who settled in the area of Newton Creek in 1681.

Saddlertown

In the late 1830s, a runaway slave, who had taken the surname Saddler to avoid detection by his former master, came to New Jersey from a Maryland plantation with his wife and two daughters. Saddler worked for Cy Evans, a local Quaker farmer, from whom he bought fiveacres to farm. The area where Saddler settled became a predominantly black community known as Saddlertown, a stop on the Underground Railroad. Today, Saddlertown is racially diverse.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 2.791 square miles (7.231 km2), including 2.687 square miles (6.960 km2) of land and 0.104 square miles (0.271 km2) of water (3.74%).

Haddon Township has two exclaves, West Collingswood Heights and West Collingswood Extension. The downtown portion of the township is known as Westmont, a name probably derived from a noted harness racing horse. Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Crystal Lake, Cuthbert and Oakdale.

Haddon Township borders the Camden County municipalities of Audubon, Audubon Park, Camden, Cherry Hill (water border), Collingswood, Gloucester City, Haddonfield, Mount Ephraim, and Oaklyn.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,926
1880 1,071 −44.4%
1890 888 −17.1%
1900 2,012 126.6%
1910 1,465 −27.2%
1920 2,708 84.8%
1930 9,198 239.7%
1940 9,708 5.5%
1950 12,379 27.5%
1960 17,099 38.1%
1970 18,192 6.4%
1980 15,875 −12.7%
1990 14,837 −6.5%
2000 14,651 −1.3%
2010 14,707 0.4%
2019 (est.) 14,541 −1.1%
Population sources: 1870-2000
1870-1920 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 14,707 people, 6,226 households, and 3,860 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,472.6 per square mile (2,113.0/km2). There were 6,477 housing units at an average density of 2,410.1 per square mile (930.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 93.16% (13,701) White, 1.50% (220) Black or African American, 0.16% (23) Native American, 2.71% (398) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.11% (163) from other races, and 1.36% (200) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.95% (581) of the population.

There were 6,226 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.0% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the township, the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,392 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,948) and the median family income was $90,156 (+/- $6,251). Males had a median income of $60,221 (+/- $5,315) versus $52,179 (+/- $4,167) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,506 (+/- $2,687). About 3.6% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 14,651 people, 6,207 households, and 3,891 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,443.4 people per square mile (2,102.9/km2). There were 6,423 housing units at an average density of 2,386.4 per square mile (921.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.42% White, 1.18% African American, 0.05% Native American, 2.01% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.54% of the population.

There were 6,207 households, out of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the township the population was spread out, with 22.6% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $51,076, and the median income for a family was $65,269. Males had a median income of $44,943 versus $32,967 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,610. About 1.6% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 51.83 miles (83.41 km) of roadways, of which 39.96 miles (64.31 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.73 miles (15.66 km) by Camden County and 2.14 miles (3.44 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

Westmont station, in the downtown section of Haddon Township, is a PATCO Park-and-Ride station.

NJ Transit provides bus service between the township and Philadelphia on the 403 route, with local service available on the 450 and 451 routes.

Points of interest

Westmont Theater
Westmont Theatre

Education

The Haddon Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of seven schools, had an enrollment of 2,060 students and 165.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1. Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Thomas A. Edison Elementary School (152 students; in grades PreK-5), Clyde S. Jennings Elementary School (113; K-5), Stoy Elementary School (168; PreK-5), Strawbridge Elementary School (196; K-5), Van Sciver Elementary School (319; PreK-5), William G. Rohrer Middle School (465; 6-8) and Haddon Township High School (622; 9-12).

Prior to the establishment of Haddon Township High School in the 1960s, most Haddon Township students attended Collingswood High School, while some attended Haddonfield Memorial High School or Audubon High School.

Paul VI High School is a regional high school founded in September 1966 that operates under the oversight of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden with an enrollment of over 1,000 students. Holy Saviour School was an elementary school that operated under the auspices of the Camden diocese until it closed in 2008.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Haddon Township include:

  • Mitch Albom (born 1958), writer.
  • Laurie Beechman (1953–1998), Broadway actress.
  • Tony Black (born 1951), a record-holding jockey in North American Thoroughbred horse racing.
  • William B. Brahms (born 1966), librarian and encyclopedist.
  • George E. Brunner (1896–1975), mayor of Camden, New Jersey from 1936 to 1959.
  • William K. Dickey (1920-2008), lawyer and politician who served as Speaker of the New Jersey General Assembly and as chairman of the Delaware River Port Authority.
  • Mark Donohue (1937–1975), racecar driver.
  • Joe Flacco (born 1985), NFL Quarterback.
  • Larry Kane (born 1942), only American reporter to travel with The Beatles on their 1964 North American tour.
  • John McCarthy (1916-1998), football player and coach.
  • Don McComb (1934–2018), defensive end who played for the Boston Patriots.
  • Samuel Vaughan Merrick (1801–1870), first President of the Pennsylvania Railroad and co-founder of the Franklin Institute.
  • Cozy Morley (born 1926), entertainer, singer.
  • Sal Paolantonio (born 1956), ESPN reporter and writer.
  • Mary Roebling (1905–1994), banker, businesswoman, and philanthropist who was the first woman to serve as president of a major U.S. bank.
  • William G. Rohrer (1909-1989), founder of First Peoples Bank of New Jersey, the first bank in South Jersey to reach $1 billion in deposits, and mayor of Haddon Township for 36 years.
  • Hannah Whitall Smith (1832–1911), author in the Holiness movement and suffragette.
  • Steven Spielberg (born 1946), motion picture director and producer.
  • John M. Whitall (1800–1877), glass manufacturer and philanthropist.
  • Julianna White (born 1988), Miss New Jersey USA 2011.

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