Little Ferry, New Jersey facts for kids

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Little Ferry, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Little Ferry
361 Main Street following the 1937 Fox vault fire
361 Main Street following the 1937 Fox vault fire
Map highlighting Little Ferry's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Little Ferry's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Little Ferry, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Little Ferry, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated September 18, 1894
Area
 • Total 1.703 sq mi (4.409 km2)
 • Land 1.476 sq mi (3.822 km2)
 • Water 0.227 sq mi (0.587 km2)  13.31%
Area rank 431st of 566 in state
54th of 70 in county
Elevation 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 10,626
 • Estimate (2015) 10,963
 • Rank 230th of 566 in state
34th of 70 in county
 • Density 7,200.1/sq mi (2,780.0/km2)
 • Density rank 57th of 566 in state
17th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07643
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400340680
GNIS feature ID 0885281
Website www.littleferrynj.org

Little Ferry is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 10,626, reflecting a decline of 174 (-1.6%) from the 10,800 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 811 (+8.1%) from the 9,989 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Little Ferry was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on September 18, 1894, from portions of Lodi Township and New Barbadoes Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier. The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.

During the colonial era, the borough was the site of an important ferry crossing between the region's towns at Bergen and Hackensack, which was operated by rope on the site starting in 1659, continuing until 1826 when it was replaced by a bridge on the Bergen Turnpike.

Gethsemane Cemetery, an African burial ground, was opened in 1860 and was used for interments until 1924. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Rosie's Diner (formerly the Farmland Diner) was used in the 1970s for the filming of Bounty paper towel commercials featuring Nancy Walker as Rosie the Waitress.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Little Ferry 35th in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.703 square miles (4.409 km2), including 1.476 square miles (3.822 km2) of land and 0.227 square miles (0.587 km2) of water (13.31%).

The borough borders Hackensack, Moonachie, Ridgefield, Ridgefield Park, South Hackensack and Teterboro.

The borough lies near the confluence of the Hackensack River and Overpeck Creek in the New Jersey Meadowlands.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 58
1890 781 1,246.6%
1900 1,240 58.8%
1910 2,541 104.9%
1920 2,715 6.8%
1930 4,155 53.0%
1940 4,545 9.4%
1950 4,955 9.0%
1960 6,175 24.6%
1970 9,064 46.8%
1980 9,399 3.7%
1990 9,989 6.3%
2000 10,800 8.1%
2010 10,626 −1.6%
Est. 2015 10,963 3.2%
Population sources: 1880-1890
1890-1920 1890-1910
1910-1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 10,626 people, 4,239 households, and 2,730 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,200.1 per square mile (2,780.0/km2). There were 4,439 housing units at an average density of 3,007.8 per square mile (1,161.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 60.78% (6,458) White, 3.94% (419) Black or African American, 0.30% (32) Native American, 24.24% (2,576) Asian, 0.04% (4) Pacific Islander, 7.05% (749) from other races, and 3.65% (388) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22.98% (2,442) of the population. Korean Americans accounted for 12.0% of the population.

There were 4,239 households out of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.9% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.19. Same-sex couples headed 27 households in 2010, an increase from the 24 counted in 2000.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.7% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 29.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 92.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,276 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,389) and the median family income was $74,000 (+/- $10,299). Males had a median income of $52,898 (+/- $3,123) versus $40,934 (+/- $3,050) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,257 (+/- $2,542). About 4.8% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.1% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,800 people, 4,366 households, and 2,785 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,075.2 people per square mile (2,725.4/km2). There were 4,449 housing units at an average density of 2,914.6 per square mile (1,122.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 68.76% White, 4.71% African American, 0.15% Native American, 17.10% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 5.75% from other races, and 3.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.19% of the population.

There were 4,366 households out of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the borough the population was spread out with 20.2% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 36.3% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $49,958, and the median income for a family was $59,176. Males had a median income of $42,059 versus $34,286 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,210. About 5.9% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.4% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 20.20 miles (32.51 km) of roadways, of which 15.95 miles (25.67 km) were maintained by the municipality, 3.42 miles (5.50 km) by Bergen County and 0.83 miles (1.34 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The Little Ferry Circle connects U.S. Route 46 and Bergen Turnpike. The circle was originally constructed in 1933 in conjunction with the nearby Route 46 Hackensack River Bridge, which crosses the river to Ridgefield Park and beyond to the George Washington Bridge.The circle was largely reconstructed in 1985, allowing vehicles traveling on Route 46 to pass directly through the circle. The circle has been a constant site of accidents, with 40-50 accidents per year at the circle each year from 2004 through 2006. In March 2007, the New Jersey Department of Transportation proposed its latest plan to address issues at the circle. The plan would realign the circle into a straight intersection, complete with turning lanes; prohibit left turns onto many residential streets; and would include construction of a pump station to move water off the oft-flooded highway and into the Hackensack River.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus routes 161 and 165 provide service between Little Ferry and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, with local service on the 772 route.

The Little Ferry Seaplane Base (FAA LID: 2N7) is a public-use seaplane base located 1-mile (1.6 km) east of the borough's central business district, on the Hackensack River. The base is privately owned.


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