West Milford, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
See also: Milford, New Jersey and New Milford, New Jersey
West Milford, New Jersey
Township
Township of West Milford
Old Country Store at Long Pond Ironworks
Old Country Store at Long Pond Ironworks
Motto: "A Clean Community"
Map of West Milford Township in Passaic County. Inset shows Passaic County's location in New Jersey
Map of West Milford Township in Passaic County. Inset shows Passaic County's location in New Jersey
Census Bureau map of West Milford, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of West Milford, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated March 10, 1834
Named for Milford, Connecticut
Area
 • Total 80.316 sq mi (208.018 km2)
 • Land 75.090 sq mi (194.483 km2)
 • Water 5.226 sq mi (13.534 km2)  6.51%
Area rank 10th of 566 in state
1st of 16 in county
Elevation 827 ft (252 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 25,850
 • Estimate (2015) 26,770
 • Rank 96th of 566 in state
5th of 16 in county
 • Density 344.3/sq mi (132.9/km2)
 • Density rank 467th of 566 in state
16th of 16 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07480
Area code(s) 973 exchanges: 657, 728
FIPS code 3403179460
GNIS feature ID 0882315
Website www.westmilford.org

West Milford is a township in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 25,850, reflecting a decline of 560 (-2.1%) from the 26,410 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 980 (+3.9%) from the 25,430 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

West Milford started out as New Milford in what was then western Bergen County in the 18th century, having been settled by disenchanted Dutch from Milford, New Jersey (later renamed by the British as Newark). These same Dutch also built a town of New Milford in eastern Bergen County. When both New Milfords applied for post offices in 1828, a clerk in Washington, D.C. is said to have approved the other application first and assigned the name "West Milford" to the New Milford in western Bergen County in order to distinguish between the two locations.

West Milford became a municipality by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 10, 1834, when it was formed from the westernmost portions of both Franklin Township (now Wyckoff) and Saddle River Township (now Saddle Brook), while the area was still part of Bergen County. On February 7, 1837, Passaic County was created from portions of both Bergen County and Essex County, with West Milford as the western end of the newly formed county. The township was named for Milford, Connecticut.

There are old name places in the township including Postville, Utterville, Corterville, Browns, Awosting, Echo Lake, Macopin, Charlottenburg (now under the Charlotteburg Reservoir, the community was named after King George III's wife, Queen Charlotte), Clinton (or sometimes called Clinton Furnace, now under the Clinton Reservoir, and the furnace still stands), Moe Mountain, Oak Ridge (a nameplace, but town is under the Oak Ridge Reservoir), Newfoundland, Apshawa, New City, and Smith Mills. Newfoundland is divided by the Pequannock River, which divides Passaic and Morris Counties; a small part of Newfoundland lies within Jefferson Township. A large part of the township, including the New City Village area, is reservoir property owned by the City of Newark in Essex County for its water supply. Prior to the Second World War, the township was a resort area with trains coming from New York City to stations at Charlotteburg, Newfoundland, Oak Ridge in the south and Hewitt (also known as Sterling Forest station) and Awosting in the north. Railroad service in the south was from the New Jersey Midland starting around the 1850s and in the north around the 1870s from the Montclair Railroad, out of Montclair, New Jersey and later the Erie Railroad (before their merger with the Lackawanna Railroad).

Greenwood Lake is an interstate lake approximately 9 miles (14 km) long and covering 1,920 acres (780 ha), lying in both West Milford and Greenwood Lake, New York, across the New York state line. It was originally called Long Pond. It was dammed up to increase the size of the lake for water power down stream. During the resort era, several steamboats operated on the lake, the most famous and grand was the two deck steamer, Montclair. These steamboats met the trains and took passengers to the various resorts around the lake in both states.

There is a seaplane area on Greenwood Lake, a few large marinas and lakeside restaurants with docks. A public airport called Greenwood Lake Airport is located just south of the lake on top of a mountain ridge and has two landing strips; one is long enough to handle small jets. There is one private airport in the township on a private estate.

After World War II and for the next 20 years the area underwent a major change from a resort area to year-round residences. Before there were year-round houses, the summer residence of Cecil B. Demille was West Milford. Road maps of the 1950s showing the population on the backside said 2,000 winter and 10,000 summer.

Jeremiah "Jerry" Goodfellow, a white German shepherd and the senior canine member of the New Jersey Search and Rescue was inducted into the Animal Hall of Fame in 2009. Jerry lives with his owner and trainer, Sue Lavoie, on Union Valley Road in West Milford.

Geography

New york view
View of Wanaque Reservoir and Manhattan from a mountain near the West Milford-Ringwood border.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 80.316 square miles (208.018 km2), including 75.090 square miles (194.483 km2) of land and 5.226 square miles (13.534 km2) of water (6.51%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Apshawa, Awosting, Bearfort Waters, Beaver Pond, Boy Scout Lake, Browns, Buckabear Pond, Camp Rope, Cedar Pond, Charlotteburg, Clinton, Clinton Reservoir, Cooper, Dunker Pond, Echo Lake, Forest Hill Lake, Fox Island, Gordon Lakes, Green Valley Park, Greenwood Lake, Greenwood Lake Glens, Hacks Pond, Henion Pond, Hewitt, Himes Pond, Lake Lockover, Lakeside, Lindy Lake, Littletown, Lower Mt. Glen Lake, Macopin, Matthews Lake, Moe, Mount Laurel Lake, Newfoundland, Oak Ridge, Pettets Pond. Pine Crest Lake, Pinecliff Lake, Postville, Shady Lake, Smiths Mills, Surprise Lake, Terrace Pond, Upper Greenwood Lake, Upper Macopin, Upper Mt. Glen Lake, Uttertown, Vreeland Pond, West Milford Lakes, West Pond, Wonder Lake and Zeliff Pond.

The township borders the municipalities of Bloomingdale, Butler and Ringwood in Passaic County; Kinnelon in Morris County; and Warwick in Orange County, New York.

Pequannock River Watershed

Portions of the township are owned by the City of Newark, Essex County, for its Pequannock River Watershed, which supplies water to the city from an area of 35,000 acres (14,000 ha) that also includes portions of Hardyston Township, Jefferson Township, Kinnelon, Rockaway Township and Vernon Township.

A small residential development known as "New City Village" or "New City Colony" was built on the property early in the 20th century to house workers of the Newark water supply system. It included a school and health facility. Proposed alternative uses for the village never materialized and the buildings were demolished after falling into disrepair. The land is still owned by the City of Newark.

Newfoundland and Green Pond

Newfoundland is a neighborhood of West Milford located along the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYS&W) tracks (freight service only) and Route 23. It is also a mailing address for Green Pond (just north of the Picatinny Arsenal in Rockaway Township, Morris County), a private lake community owned by Green Pond Corporation and Lake End Corporation, which lies in Rockaway Township where the Pequannock River divides Passaic County from Morris County.

The 2003 film The Station Agent was set, and filmed, largely in Newfoundland. There was an early silent movie produced in the township at the Mine Hole in the Hewitt section of the township. A still photo of that movie is published in the township's 1984 sesquicentennial book entitled The Day the Earth Shook and the Sky Turned Red.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 2,108
1850 2,624 24.5%
1860 2,402 −8.5%
1870 2,660 10.7%
1880 2,591 −2.6%
1890 2,486 −4.1%
1900 2,112 −15.0%
1910 1,967 −6.9%
1920 1,763 −10.4%
1930 1,901 7.8%
1940 2,501 31.6%
1950 3,650 45.9%
1960 8,157 123.5%
1970 17,304 112.1%
1980 22,750 31.5%
1990 25,430 11.8%
2000 26,410 3.9%
2010 25,850 −2.1%
Est. 2015 26,770 3.6%
Population sources:
1840-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 25,850 people, 9,625 households, and 7,084 families residing in the township. The population density was 344.3 per square mile (132.9/km2). There were 10,419 housing units at an average density of 138.8 per square mile (53.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 94.06% (24,315) White, 1.40% (362) Black or African American, 0.52% (134) Native American, 1.29% (334) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.06% (273) from other races, and 1.66% (428) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.85% (1,512) of the population.

There were 9,625 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.4% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 33.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.7 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,692 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,308) and the median family income was $102,410 (+/- $7,418). Males had a median income of $62,925 (+/- $3,467) versus $45,449 (+/- $2,738) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,905 (+/- $2,289). About 1.7% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 63 households in 2010, an increase from the 58 counted in 2000.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 16,029 people, 9,190 households, and 7,186 families residing in the township. The population density was 350.1 people per square mile (135.2/km2). There were 9,909 housing units at an average density of 131.4 per square mile (50.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.08% White, 1.23% African American, 0.60% Native American, 1.02% Asian, 0.61% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.38% of the population.

There were 9,190 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.8% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the township the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $74,124, and the median income for a family was $80,264. Males had a median income of $51,105 versus $37,159 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,612. About 2.6% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Railroad

The New Jersey Midland Railway ran a trackage right-of-way through West Milford in 1872 developing the Newfoundland station, whichand later served passengers on the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad (NYS&W), which still serves freight along the line

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 198.30 miles (319.13 km) of roadways, of which 163.20 miles (262.64 km) were maintained by the municipality, 26.61 miles (42.82 km) by Passaic County and 8.49 miles (13.66 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 194 and 196 routes, with seasonal service to Mountain Creek in Vernon Township on the 304 route.

The township provides its own bus service, on two routes. One that runs by Upper Greenwood Lake, and operates Monday-Friday, and one that runs between Oak Ridge & Newfoundland, which runs Wednesdays only.

In popular culture

Portions of the 2015 made-for-television comedy Simpler Times -- starring Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara, and written / directed by Steve Monarque -- were filmed in West Milford.


West Milford, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.