Douglas, Wyoming facts for kids

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Douglas, Wyoming
City
Center Street (city center), view to the west
Center Street (city center), view to the west
Motto: "Home of the Jackalope"
Country United States
State Wyoming
County Converse
Area
 • Total 4.76 sq mi (12.33 km2)
 • Land 4.58 sq mi (11.86 km2)
 • Water 0.18 sq mi (0.47 km2)
Elevation 4,836 ft (1,474 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 6,120
 • Estimate (2012) 6,280
 • Density 1,336.2/sq mi (515.9/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 82633
Area code(s) 307
FIPS code 56-21125
GNIS feature ID 1587750
Website City of Douglas Wyoming

Douglas is a city in Converse County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 6,120 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Converse County and the home of the Wyoming State Fair.

Its former railroad passenger depot is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

History

Douglas-Wyoming-1920s-postcard
Center St., looking east (1920s)

Douglas was platted in 1886 when the Wyoming Central Railway (later the Chicago and North Western Transportation Company) established a railway station; the settlement had been in existence since 1867 when Fort Fetterman was built and was first known as "Tent City" before it was officially named "Douglas", after Senator Stephen A. Douglas. It served as a supply point, warehousing and retail, for surrounding cattle ranches, as well as servicing railway crews, cowboys and the troops of the U.S. Army stationed at Fort Fetterman.

Douglas was the home of a World War II internment camp.

Geography

Douglas is located at 42°45′22″N 105°23′4″W / 42.75611°N 105.38444°W / 42.75611; -105.38444 (42.756008, -105.384555).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.76 square miles (12.33 km2), of which, 4.58 square miles (11.86 km2) is land and 0.18 square miles (0.47 km2) is water.

Climate

Douglas has a semi-arid climate (Köppen climate classification BSk).

Climate data for Douglas, Wyoming
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 65
(18.3)
69
(20.6)
77
(25)
86
(30)
93
(33.9)
103
(39.4)
103
(39.4)
101
(38.3)
97
(36.1)
88
(31.1)
76
(24.4)
68
(20)
103
(39.4)
Average high °F (°C) 37.4
(3)
41.6
(5.33)
49.2
(9.56)
57.5
(14.17)
67.2
(19.56)
79.0
(26.11)
86.4
(30.22)
85.3
(29.61)
74.8
(23.78)
62.2
(16.78)
46.3
(7.94)
38.6
(3.67)
60.46
(15.81)
Daily mean °F (°C) 23.7
(-4.61)
28.3
(-2.06)
35.9
(2.17)
43.5
(6.39)
53.1
(11.72)
63.5
(17.5)
70.3
(21.28)
68.8
(20.44)
58.1
(14.5)
46.2
(7.89)
32.9
(0.5)
25.0
(-3.89)
45.78
(7.653)
Average low °F (°C) 9.9
(-12.28)
14.9
(-9.5)
22.5
(-5.28)
29.5
(-1.39)
39.0
(3.89)
47.9
(8.83)
54.2
(12.33)
52.2
(11.22)
41.3
(5.17)
30.1
(-1.06)
19.5
(-6.94)
11.4
(-11.44)
31.03
(-0.537)
Record low °F (°C) −38
(-38.9)
−33
(-36.1)
−19
(-28.3)
−12
(-24.4)
16
(-8.9)
28
(-2.2)
34
(1.1)
29
(-1.7)
11
(-11.7)
−6
(-21.1)
−24
(-31.1)
−41
(-40.6)
−41
(-40.6)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.38
(9.7)
0.42
(10.7)
0.78
(19.8)
1.64
(41.7)
2.50
(63.5)
1.42
(36.1)
1.56
(39.6)
0.91
(23.1)
1.07
(27.2)
0.80
(20.3)
0.74
(18.8)
0.36
(9.1)
12.58
(319.5)
Source #1: NOAA (normals, 1971–2000)
Source #2: The Weather Channel (Records)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 491
1900 734 49.5%
1910 2,246 206.0%
1920 2,294 2.1%
1930 1,917 −16.4%
1940 2,205 15.0%
1950 2,544 15.4%
1960 2,822 10.9%
1970 2,677 −5.1%
1980 6,030 125.3%
1990 5,076 −15.8%
2000 5,288 4.2%
2010 6,120 15.7%
Est. 2015 6,531 6.7%

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 6,120 people, 2,546 households, and 1,613 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,336.2 inhabitants per square mile (515.9/km2). There were 2,788 housing units at an average density of 608.7 per square mile (235.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.4% White, 0.3% African American, 0.8% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 2.2% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.6% of the population.

There were 2,546 households of which 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.6% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.98.

The median age in the city was 35 years. 27.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.5% were from 25 to 44; 25.8% were from 45 to 64; and 10.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.0% male and 50.0% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 5,288 people, 2,118 households, and 1,423 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,035.0 people per square mile (399.6/km²). There were 2,385 housing units at an average density of 466.8 per square mile (180.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.12% White, 0.06% African American, 0.78% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.63% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.64% of the population.

There were 2,118 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,944, and the median income for a family was $44,900. Males had a median income of $36,489 versus $18,662 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,634. About 11.9% of families and 14.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.6% of those under age 18 and 14.7% of those age 65 or over.

Culture

Douglas Railroad Interp Center
Part of the exhibition at the Douglas Railroad Interpretive Center
(left: the CB&Q dining car #196; right: the CB&Q steam locomotive #5633.)

Douglas is located on the banks of the North Platte River, and is named for Stephen A. Douglas, U.S. Senator. The city grew after it was designated a stop on the Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Railroad. Railroads brought settlers and pioneers west; some stayed and others continued on. Douglas' location affords excellent access to nearby sights. Medicine Bow National Forest is located nearby, as is Thunder Basin National Grassland and Ayres Natural Bridge. In 1996 Douglas was listed by Norman Crampton as one of The 100 Best Small Towns in America.

The former Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Railroad Passenger Depot in Douglas is included on the National Register of Historic Places. The Douglas Chamber of Commerce, part of the Douglas Railroad Interpretive Center is located in the depot. The free of charge exhibition outside contains eight railroad vehicles, one steam locomotive with tender and seven cars.

Horse culture

Since Fort Fetterman days, Douglas has been a center of American horse culture. The remains of the first winner of American racing's Triple Crown, thoroughbred Sir Barton, are buried here. Today, Douglas is the location of the Wyoming State Fair, held every summer and known for its rodeo and animal competitions. Also on the fairgrounds is the Wyoming Pioneer Memorial Museum, a collection of pioneer and Native American relics pertaining to the history of Converse County.

Jackalopes

Jackalope square, Douglas, Wyoming 12
Jackalope Square

In 1932, the jackalope legend in the United States was attributed by the New York Times to Douglas Herrick (1920−2003) of Douglas, and thus the city was named the "Home of the Jackalope" by the state of Wyoming in 1985. Douglas has issued Jackalope Hunting licenses to tourists. The tags are good for hunting during official Jackalope season, which occurs for only one day, June 31.

According to the Douglas Chamber of Commerce, a 1930s hunting trip for jackrabbits led to the idea of a Jackalope. Herrick and his brother had studied taxidermy by mail order as teenagers. When the brothers returned from a hunting trip, Herrick tossed a jackrabbit carcass into the taxidermy shop, which rested beside a pair of deer antlers. The accidental combination of animal forms sparked Douglas Herrick's idea for a jackalope.

Wyoming State Fair

Douglas State Fair
Wyoming State Fair Main Entrance

Each August Douglas hosts the Wyoming State Fair, not to be confused with Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo held in late July. The fair includes a carnival midway, live entertainment, and its own rodeo. On August 12, 2009, the fair hosted country music star John Anderson. The centennial fair in 2012 attracted sixty thousand persons, large by Wyoming standards; the Dierks Bentley concert was the first ever sold-out show in the fair.

The 101st fair opened in Douglas on August 10, 2013; it corresponds with the centennial of the Wyoming State 4-H Club, an active group in the annual fair. Fair performers will include country musicians Hunter Hayes and Brantley Gilbert.

Transportation

Highways

  • I-25 North-South Interstate running from New Mexico to Wyoming; runs concurrent with US 87 through Douglas.
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link BL|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev BL]] I-25 Business, an alternate Business Route of I-25, running through the center of Douglas.
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link WY|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev WY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link WY|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev WY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link WY|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev WY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link WY|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev WY]]
  • [[Template:Infobox road/WY/link WY|Template:Infobox road/WY/abbrev WY]]

Airport

Air service is available 58 miles west of Douglas at Casper/Natrona County International Airport. The airport is located west of Casper, just off of US Highway 26. Passenger flights are offered by United Express (SkyWest Airlines), Delta Connection (SkyWest Airlines), and Allegiant Airlines.


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