Pegasus (constellation) facts for kids

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Pegasus
Constellation
PegasusCC.jpg
The constellation Pegasus as it can be seen by the naked eye.
Abbreviation Peg
Genitive Pegasi
Pronunciation /ˈpɛɡəsəs/,
genitive /ˈpɛɡəs/
Symbolism the Winged Horse / Pegasus
Right ascension 21h 12.6m to 00h 14.6m
Declination +2.33° to +36.61°
Quadrant NQ4
Area 1121 sq. deg. (7th)
Main stars 9, 17
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars
88
Stars with planets 12
Stars brighter than 3.00m 5
Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly) 3
Brightest star ε Peg (Enif) (2.38m)
Nearest star EQ Peg
(20.38 ly, 6.25 pc)
Messier objects 1
Meteor showers July Pegasids
Bordering
constellations
Andromeda
Lacerta
Cygnus
Vulpecula
Delphinus
Equuleus
Aquarius
Pisces
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −60°.
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of October.

Pegasus is a constellation in the northern sky, named after the winged horse Pegasus in Greek mythology. It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and is one of the 88 constellations recognised today.

With an apparent magnitude varying between 2.37 and 2.45, the brightest star in Pegasus is the orange supergiant Epsilon Pegasi, also known as Enif, which marks the horse's muzzle. Alpha (Markab), Beta (Scheat), and Gamma (Algenib), together with Alpha Andromedae (Alpheratz, once also designated Delta Pegasi) form the large asterism known as the Square of Pegasus. Twelve star systems have been found to have exoplanets. 51 Pegasi was the first Sun-like star discovered to have an exoplanet companion.

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Pegasus (constellation) Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.