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Englishtown, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Englishtown
Looking north along Main Street (CR 527) away from Tennent Avenue (CR 522)
Looking north along Main Street (CR 527) away from Tennent Avenue (CR 522)
Motto(s): 
History, Harmony, and Hospitality
Map of Englishtown in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Englishtown in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Englishtown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Englishtown, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated January 4, 1888
Named for James English
Government
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 0.59 sq mi (1.52 km2)
 • Land 0.57 sq mi (1.48 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.04 km2)  2.88%
Area rank 543rd of 565 in state
46th of 53 in county
Elevation
69 ft (21 m)
Population
 • Total 1,847
 • Estimate 
(2019)
1,912
 • Rank 495th of 566 in state
42nd of 53 in county
 • Density 3,245.7/sq mi (1,253.2/km2)
 • Density rank 203rd of 566 in state
23rd of 53 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07726
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 446, 536, 591, 617, 786, 792, 970
FIPS code 3402521570
GNIS feature ID 0885211
Website

Englishtown is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. The community is nestled within the Raritan Valley region. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,847, reflecting an increase of 83 (+4.7%) from the 1,764 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 496 (+39.1%) from the 1,268 counted in the 1990 Census.

Englishtown was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 4, 1888, from portions of Manalapan Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day. The borough was named for James English, an early settler.

History

At the Battle of Monmouth, an American Revolutionary War battle fought on June 28, 1778 in Monmouth County, American General Charles Lee led the advance and initiated the first attack on the column's rear. When the British turned to flank him, he ordered a general retreat without so as much as firing a shot at the enemy, and his soldiers soon became disorganized. General George Washington continued the battle, earning respect for the Continental Army troops under his command. In the dining room of the Village Inn, located in the center of Englishtown, General Washington and Lord Stirling drew up the court martial papers citing Lee for his conduct during and after the battle.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.586 square miles (1.517 km2), including 0.569 square miles (1.474 km2) of land and 0.017 square miles (0.043 km2) of water (2.85%).

The borough is entirely surrounded by Manalapan Township, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 444
1900 410 −7.7%
1910 468 14.1%
1920 641 37.0%
1930 797 24.3%
1940 815 2.3%
1950 1,004 23.2%
1960 1,143 13.8%
1970 1,048 −8.3%
1980 976 −6.9%
1990 1,268 29.9%
2000 1,764 39.1%
2010 1,847 4.7%
2019 (est.) 1,912 3.5%
Population sources: 1890-1920
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,847 people, 621 households, and 458 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,245.7 per square mile (1,253.2/km2). There were 647 housing units at an average density of 1,137.0 per square mile (439.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 88.14% (1,628) White, 2.60% (48) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 6.82% (126) Asian, 0.11% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.92% (17) from other races, and 1.41% (26) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.01% (148) of the population.

There were 621 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.2% were non-families. 20.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 25.5% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,795 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,336) and the median family income was $86,484 (+/- $8,333). Males had a median income of $65,625 (+/- $10,588) versus $43,333 (+/- $8,417) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,313 (+/- $2,456). About 1.5% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,764 people, 643 households, and 416 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,102.1 people per square mile (1,194.9/km2). There were 680 housing units at an average density of 1,195.8 per square mile (460.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.38% White, 4.14% African American, .11% Native American, 4.48% Asian, 1.64% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.24% of the population.

There were 643 households, out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.8% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.51.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 29.1% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 36.5% from 25 to 44, 17.5% from 45 to 64, and 11% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.4 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $57,557, and the median income for a family was $73,750. Males had a median income of $50,694 versus $33,068 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,438. About 4% of families and 7.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 13.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

2018-05-27 18 11 23 View east along Monmouth County Route 522 (Wood Avenue) at Lasatta Avenue-Harmony Lane in Englishtown, Monmouth County, New Jersey
CR 522 entering Englishtown

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 6.42 miles (10.33 km) of roadways, of which 4.44 miles (7.15 km) were maintained by the municipality and 1.98 miles (3.19 km) by Monmouth County.

County Route 522 and County Route 527 are the most prominent roads directly serving the borough.

Public transportation

In the 19th & 20th centuries, Englishtown Borough and Manalapan Township had a major railway in the area, which was the Freehold and Jamesburg Agricultural Railroad. This railway was owned and operated by the Camden & Amboy Railroad Company (C&A), in which surveying for the line began on September 8, 1851, grading began on October 19, 1852, and the first track was laid on April 4, 1853. The first section of line was opened on July 18, 1853. The establishment of the Freehold & Jamesburg Agricultural Railroad allowed this region to become a transportation hub. The Freehold and Jamesburg Railroad was abandoned by the early 1930s. A 2.8-mile long (4.5 km) portion of the former railroad's right-of-way was later approved to be sold by the New Jersey Board of Public Utility Commissioners (PUC) to Jersey Central Power & Light Company in 1966, with occasional freight service still being utilized through the Freehold Industrial Track.

NJ Transit offers bus service between Englishtown and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, which is available on the 139 route.

Old Bridge Airport and Mar Bar L Farms municipal airport are within 2½ miles of Englishtown, offering short-distance flights to surrounding areas.

Points of interest

Education

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District, which also serves children from Manalapan Township. Manalapan and Englishtown formally joined together as a regional elementary school district in 1963, with an initial enrollment of 1,140 students; The student body is primarily from Manalapan Township, which accounts for about 95% of enrollment, with Englishtown students accounting for the remaining 5%. As of the 2019–20 school year, the district, comprised of eight schools, had an enrollment of 4,910 students and 408.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.0:1. Schools in the district (with 2019–20 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics) are John I. Dawes Early Learning Center with 365 students in PreK and K, Clark Mills School with 491 students in grades 1-5, Lafayette Mills School with 489 students in grades 1-5, Milford Brook School with 523 students in grades K-5, Taylor Mills School with 600 students in grades K-5, Wemrock Brook School with 626 students in grades 1-5, Pine Brook School with 563 students in sixth grade and Manalapan-Englishtown Middle School with 1,227 students in grades 7 and 8. The district is overseen by a nine-member board of education, which sets policy and oversees the fiscal and educational operation of the district; Seats on the board are allocated based on population, with one seat assigned to Englishtown.

Students from Englishtown in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Manalapan High School as part of the Freehold Regional High School District (FRHSD). The Freehold Regional High School District also serves students from Colts Neck Township, Englishtown, Farmingdale, Freehold Borough, Freehold Township, Howell Township and Marlboro Township. As of the 2019–20 school year, Manalapan High School had an enrollment of 1,879 students and 122.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.3:1. Students may apply to attend one of the district's six specialized learning centers, including the Science and Engineering Learning Center hosted at Manalapan High School. The FRHSD board of education has nine members, who are elected to three-year terms from each of the constituent districts. Each member is allocated a fraction of a vote that totals to nine points, with Englishtown allocated one member, who has 0.5 votes.

Public high school students also have the option of attending one of the Monmouth County Vocational School District's five career academies.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Englishtown, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Englishtown include:

  • Robby Andrews (born 1991), middle-distance runner.
  • Lou Brutus (born 1962), radio host, musician and photographer.
  • Dov Davidoff, stand-up comedian.
  • ICONic Boyz, dancers.
  • Ed Krawiec (born 1976), NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle racer.
  • Abhimanyu Mishra (born 2009), chess Grandmaster and prodigy.

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