Extinct in the Wild facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Corvus hawaiiensis FWS
The ʻalalā has been extinct in the wild since 2002

Extinct in the Wild (EW) is a conservation status given to a species, a group of plants or animals, when the only known living members are being kept in captivity (kept in a zoo, or planted in pots), or they are no longer living in their normal habitat.

Conservation status
Risk of extinction
Extinction

Extinct
Extinct in the Wild

Threatened

Critically Endangered
Endangered
Vulnerable
Threatened

Lower risk

Conservation Dependent
Near Threatened
Least Concern

Related pages

World Conservation Union
IUCN Red List

Species examples

Examples of such animals include:

  • Abingdon Island Tortoise
  • Red-tailed Black Shark
  • Père David's Deer
  • Barbary Lion (extinct in the wild since 1922)
  • Wyoming Toad (extinct in the wild since 1991)
  • Hawaiian Crow (extinct in the wild since 2002)
  • Alagoas Curassow (extinct in the wild since 1987 or 1988)
  • Socorro Dove (extinct in the wild since 1972)
  • Guam Rail (extinct in the wild since 1980)
  • Black Soft-shell Turtle
  • Butterfly Goodeid
  • Partula
  • Scimitar Oryx
  • Spix's Macaw

Reintroduction

Reintroduction is the release of species back into the wild. They come from captivity or moved from other areas where the species survives. It usually involves species that are endangered or extinct in the wild.

It is very hard to reintroduce EW species into the wild, even if their natural habitats were fixed. The main reason may be that the survival skills, which are passed from parents to offspring during parenting, are lost. In other words, the genetics of the species is saved, but the natural skills of the species is lost.

Status iucn3.1 EW
Picture showing Extinct in the Wild with other IUCN categories.

Extinct in the Wild Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.