Seminole, Oklahoma facts for kids

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Seminole, Oklahoma
City
Location of Seminole, Oklahoma
Location of Seminole, Oklahoma
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Seminole
Area
 • Total 14.5 sq mi (37.6 km2)
 • Land 13.9 sq mi (36.1 km2)
 • Water 0.6 sq mi (1.5 km2)
Elevation 892 ft (272 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 6,899
 • Density 494.7/sq mi (191.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 74818, 74868
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-66350
GNIS feature ID 1097908
Website www.seminole-oklahoma.net

Seminole is a city in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 6,899 at the 2000 census. Seminole experienced a large population growth in the 1920s due to an oil boom.

History

The city was platted in 1906 as a relocation setting for the residents of Tidmore, when the railroad line was placed north of the town. When Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory merged to become the U.S. state of Oklahoma in 1907, there were 206 residents.

Seminole competed to be the county seat of Seminole County, but lost out to Wewoka.

Upon the discovery of a high-producing oil well in the city in 1926, Seminole transformed from a town of 854 to a boom town of 25,000 to 30,000 residents. In August 1970 Seminole hosted its first All-Night Gospel Singing. During its heyday an estimated twenty-five thousand people attended the annual event. After the boom, the population declined to about 11,000 and remained that way until 1970.

Seminole Municipal Building
The Seminole Municipal Building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places

There are multiple structures in the Seminole area listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They include the Home Stake Oil and Gas Company Building, Mekasukey Academy, the Seminole Municipal Building, the Sinclair Loading Rack, Strother Memorial Chapel, and the W.E. Grisso Mansion.

Geography

Seminole is located at Missing latitude in Module:Coordinates.formatTest()
(35.241132, -96.668419).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.5 square miles (38 km2), of which, 13.9 square miles (36 km2) of it is land and 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2) of it (3.93%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 476
1920 854 79.4%
1930 11,459 1,241.8%
1940 11,547 0.8%
1950 11,863 2.7%
1960 11,464 −3.4%
1970 7,878 −31.3%
1980 8,590 9.0%
1990 7,071 −17.7%
2000 6,899 −2.4%
2010 7,488 8.5%
Est. 2015 7,522 0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census of 2000, there were 6,899 people, 2,760 households, and 1,827 families residing in the city. The population density was 494.7 people per square mile (190.9/km²). There were 3,172 housing units at an average density of 227.4 per square mile (87.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 73.42% White, 3.97% African American, 16.38% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.72% from other races, and 5.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.61% of the population.

There were 2,760 households out of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the city, the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 19.7% from 45 to 64, and 19.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 87.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,120, and the median income for a family was $29,091. Males had a median income of $26,765 versus $17,474 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,946. About 16.3% of families and 19.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.2% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.

Notable natives

  • David L. Boren, former Oklahoma Governor, State Senator, and current President of the University of Oklahoma.
  • Ronald Chase, Arts Educator, Painter, Actor, Photographer, Film Director, Opera Experimenter.
  • Enoch Kelly Haney, Principal Chief of the Seminole Nation, Artist, and former Oklahoma State Senator
  • Edmond Harjo, Seminole Code Talker during World War II and recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal
  • Arthur Jones, founder of Nautilus, Inc.
  • Jesse Pearson, actor and screenwriter, born in Seminole in 1930
  • Troy N. Smith, founder of Sonic Drive-In
  • William C. Wantland, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Eau Claire
  • Aaron Gwyn, novelist and short story writer

Seminole, Oklahoma Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.