White Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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White Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of White
Beaver Brook Wildlife Management Area in White Township
Beaver Brook Wildlife Management Area in White Township
Map of White Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of White Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of White Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of White Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated April 9, 1913
Named for Alexander White
Area
 • Total 27.632 sq mi (71.565 km2)
 • Land 27.152 sq mi (70.322 km2)
 • Water 0.480 sq mi (1.243 km2)  1.74%
Area rank 98th of 566 in state
4th of 22 in county
Elevation 525 ft (160 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 4,882
 • Estimate (2015) 4,743
 • Rank 382nd of 566 in state
10th of 22 in county
 • Density 179.8/sq mi (69.4/km2)
 • Density rank 516th of 566 in state
16th of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07823 - Belvidere
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3404180570
GNIS feature ID 0882246
Website whitetwp-nj.com

White Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,882, reflecting an increase of 637 (+15.0%) from the 4,245 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 642 (+17.8%) from the 3,603 counted in the 1990 Census. It is part of the easternmost region of the Lehigh Valley.

White Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 9, 1913, from portions of Oxford Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 1, 1913, making it the second-youngest township in the county. The township was named after Alexander White, who came to the area sometime before 1760 and built a stone mansion called "The White House" near a place called Roxburg.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 27.632 square miles (71.565 km2), including 27.152 square miles (70.322 km2) of land and 0.480 square miles (1.243 km2) of water (1.74%). The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches for 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Bridgeville (with a 2010 Census population of 106), Brookfield (675) and Buttzville (146) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within the township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Cornish, Foul Rift, Hazen, Little York, Manunka Chunk, Sarepta and Summerfield.

Mount No More is a mountain that is part of the New York–New Jersey Highlands of the Appalachian Mountains. The summit rises to 1,142 feet (348 m).

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 1,161
1930 1,200 3.4%
1940 1,335 11.3%
1950 1,536 15.1%
1960 1,832 19.3%
1970 2,326 27.0%
1980 2,748 18.1%
1990 3,603 31.1%
2000 4,245 17.8%
2010 4,882 15.0%
Est. 2015 4,743 −2.8%
Population sources: 1920
1920-1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,882 people, 2,115 households, and 1,328 families residing in the township. The population density was 179.8 per square mile (69.4/km2). There were 2,304 housing units at an average density of 84.9 per square mile (32.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 95.33% (4,654) White, 2.03% (99) Black or African American, 0.08% (4) Native American, 0.76% (37) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.78% (38) from other races, and 1.00% (49) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.74% (134) of the population.

There were 2,115 households out of which 19.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.2% were non-families. 33.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 22.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the township, the population was spread out with 17.0% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 16.7% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 28.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 50.9 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $68,247 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,170) and the median family income was $81,975 (+/- $7,157). Males had a median income of $57,222 (+/- $15,520) versus $49,022 (+/- $7,746) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,964 (+/- $3,448). About 4.2% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,245 people, 1,668 households, and 1,179 families residing in the township. The population density was 155.1 people per square mile (59.9/km²). There were 1,770 housing units at an average density of 64.7 per square mile (25.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.35% White, 1.20% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.12% of the population.

There were 1,668 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.6% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the township the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $54,732, and the median income for a family was $66,127. Males had a median income of $49,044 versus $35,000 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,783. About 2.2% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 66.08 miles (106.35 km) of roadways, of which 36.13 miles (58.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 22.26 miles (35.82 km) by Warren County and 7.69 miles (12.38 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

U.S. Route 46 passes through the northern part of the township while Route 31 passes through briefly in the east before ending at Route 46. The major county road that passes through is CR 519.

Two limited access roads provide access to the municipality: Interstate 78/U.S. 22 in neighboring Franklin and Interstate 80 in neighboring Knowlton Township and Hope Township.

Landmarks and places of interest

Regular meetings of the Warren County Board of chosen freeholders are held at the Wayne Dumont Jr. Administrative Building in White Township, which also houses most of the administrative offices of Warren County. Part of the Pequest Fish Hatchery also lies within the boundaries of White Township. Four Sisters Winery is located in White Township.


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