Blairstown, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Blairstown, New Jersey
Township
Township of Blairstown
Blair Lake Spillway
Blair Lake Spillway
Map of Blairstown Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Blairstown Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Blairstown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Blairstown, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated April 14, 1845
Named for John Insley Blair
Area
 • Total 31.704 sq mi (82.112 km2)
 • Land 30.817 sq mi (79.816 km2)
 • Water 0.887 sq mi (2.297 km2)  2.80%
Area rank 80th of 566 in state
2nd of 22 in county
Elevation 364 ft (111 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 5,967
 • Estimate (2015) 5,819
 • Rank 346th of 566 in state
7th of 22 in county
 • Density 193.6/sq mi (74.7/km2)
 • Density rank 508th of 566 in state
15th of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07825
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3404106160
GNIS feature ID 0882317
Website www.blairstowntownship.org

Blairstown is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 5,967 reflecting an increase of 220 (+3.8%) from the 5,747 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 416 (+7.8%) from the 5,331 counted in the 1990 Census.

The area had been known as Smith's Mill and was later called Butts Bridge (variously spelled as "Butt's Bridge" and "Butts' Bridge"), named for a family that owned the eponymous crossing of the Paulins Kill.

Blairstown was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 14, 1845, from portions of Knowlton Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. The township was named for John Insley Blair.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.704 square miles (82.112 km2), including 30.817 square miles (79.816 km2) of land and 0.887 square miles (2.297 km2) of water (2.80%). The township is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches for 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama.

Blairstown CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 515) is a unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within the township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Blair Lake, Cedar Lake, Cooks Pond, Jacksonburg, Kalaroma, Lake Susquehanna, Mount Vernon, Paulina, Vail and Walnut Valley.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 1,405
1860 1,542 9.8%
1870 1,379 −10.6%
1880 1,458 5.7%
1890 1,662 14.0%
1900 1,576 −5.2%
1910 1,718 9.0%
1920 1,361 −20.8%
1930 1,416 4.0%
1940 1,449 2.3%
1950 1,571 8.4%
1960 1,797 14.4%
1970 2,189 21.8%
1980 4,360 99.2%
1990 5,331 22.3%
2000 5,747 7.8%
2010 5,967 3.8%
Est. 2015 5,819 1.3%
Population sources: 1850-1920
1850-1870 1850 1870
1880-1890 1890-1910
1910-1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the United States Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton metropolitan area which includes Carbon, Lehigh, and Northampton Counties, PA and Warren County, NJ.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 5,967 people, 2,124 households, and 1,703 families residing in the township. The population density was 193.6 per square mile (74.7/km2). There were 2,272 housing units at an average density of 73.7 per square mile (28.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 96.03% (5,730) White, 1.12% (67) Black or African American, 0.12% (7) Native American, 1.14% (68) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.45% (27) from other races, and 1.14% (68) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.79% (226) of the population.

There were 2,124 households out of which 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.8% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.8% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.3 years. For every 100 females there were 99.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,952 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,269) and the median family income was $92,063 (+/- $14,594). Males had a median income of $73,818 (+/- $7,161) versus $54,959 (+/- $13,254) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,393 (+/- $7,342). About 4.1% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 5,747 people, 2,040 households, and 1,638 families residing in the township. The population density was 185.3 people per square mile (71.5/km²). There were 2,136 housing units at an average density of 68.9 per square mile (26.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 98.17% White, 0.26% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.98% of the population.

There were 2,040 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.6% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.7% were non-families. 15.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the township the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $64,809, and the median income for a family was $71,214. Males had a median income of $51,931 versus $33,646 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,775. About 3.0% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 85.92 miles (138.27 km) of roadways, of which 61.05 miles (98.25 km) were maintained by the municipality, 17.23 miles (27.73 km) by Warren County and 7.64 miles (12.30 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

CR 521 is the main county road that passes through in the eastern section while Route 94 passes runs east-west through the center of the township.

While Interstate 80 (Bergen-Passaic Expy) passes through briefly in the southern part without any interchanges, it is accessible via Routes 94 and 521 in neighboring Knowlton and Hope Townships, respectively.

Airport

Blairstown Airport (1N7) is located southwest of the central business district. It is the home of Yards Creek Soaring, which offers glider rides where you can see Blairstown from the air.

Railroads

The Lackawanna Cut-Off, a high-speed, double-track railway line that stretches for 28.45 miles (45.79 km) was constructed by the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad between 1908 and 1911, opening for service on December 24, 1911. It ran west from Port Morris, New Jersey to Slateford, Pennsylvania and passed through Blairstown. The DL&W RR merged with the Erie Railroad on October 17, 1960, to form the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad. Due to declining revenues, passenger service over the Lackawanna Cut-Off was discontinued on January 5, 1970, and freight service ceased in 1979, just three years after the E-L was absorbed into the Consolidated Railroad Company (Conrail). The tracks remained relatively dormant until 1984, when the property was sold to a developer and rails removed. The right of way is now the property of the State of New Jersey, and plans are underway for the restoration of rail service in the future. Blairstown's poured concrete passenger and freight stations still stand, although privately owned.

Blairstown Station
The former Blairstown New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad station site, as seen in October 2011, as a parking lot for Foot Bridge Park.

Blairstown was also served by a second railroad, the Blairstown Railway. The little short line, a personal project of the local industrial magnate John Insley Blair, was constructed in 1876 from Blairstown to Delaware, NJ, where it connected with the Old Main Line of the Lackawanna RR. The Blairstown Railway was absorbed by the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad in 1882 as it built west to the coal fields of Pennsylvania. The NYS&W also operated passenger service between Blairstown and New York (via Jersey City, NJ) until 1935. A third railroad, the Lehigh & New England Railroad, operated through Blairstown via trackage rights over the NYS&W between Swartswood Junction and Hainesburg Junction until October 31, 1961, when the L&NE was abandoned. With the loss of L&NE trackage rights revenues and little local business to sustain the line, the NYS&W also abandoned its line through Blairstown shortly thereafter, and the tracks were removed in 1962. The right of way today has been preserved by the State of New Jersey as the 26-mile (42 km) long Paulinskill Valley Trail.

Landmarks

Royshall
Now painted a bright blue, historic Roy's Hall is a highlight of Blairstown's Main Street.
  • Blairstown Historic District
  • Historic Blairstown Theater (also known as Roy's Hall) was built in 1913 as a silent movie house. The building was restored and painted blue in 2005 and is the centerpiece of Blairstown's vintage Main Street, surrounded by charming shops, galleries and restaurants. The HBT features a regular schedule of live music and theatrical performances, classic film and community events.
  • The Blairstown Museum is a private, non-profit corporation organized under New Jersey law managed by a Board of Directors and housed in a 19th century building, known as the last remaining structure of "Roy's Row". The Museum is the only general history and cultural museum for the Township of Blairstown. It cares for over 2,000 items that illustrate the history of the township and its inhabitants, including former resident and namesake John Insley Blair.

Popular culture

  • Scenes from the horror film Friday the 13th were filmed on Blairstown's Main Street, and at the Blairstown Diner on Route 94; the Boy Scout camp No-Be-Bo-Sco in adjacent Hardwick Township was the site for Camp Crystal Lake.
  • The body of Princess Doe was discovered at the Cedar Ridge Cemetery in Blairstown on July 15, 1982. She became the first unidentified body entered into the FBI's NCIC computer system.
  • Scenes from the horror film Plasterhead were filmed at the Blairstown Diner on Route 94

Blairstown, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.