Hardwick Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Hardwick Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hardwick
Spring Valley Christian Church Site
Spring Valley Christian Church Site
Map of Hardwick Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hardwick Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hardwick Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hardwick Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Warren
Royal charter January 22, 1750
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of Hardwicke
Area
 • Total 37.923 sq mi (98.221 km2)
 • Land 36.601 sq mi (94.797 km2)
 • Water 1.322 sq mi (3.425 km2)  3.49%
Area rank 61st of 566 in state
1st of 22 in county
Elevation 827 ft (252 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 1,696
 • Estimate (2015) 1,667
 • Rank 505th of 566 in state
22nd of 22 in county
 • Density 46.3/sq mi (17.9/km2)
 • Density rank 556th of 566 in state
22nd of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07825 - Blairstown, New Jersey
Area code(s) 908 exchange: 841
FIPS code 3404129820
GNIS feature ID 0882239
Website www.hardwick-nj.us

Hardwick Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 1,696, reflecting an increase of 232 (+15.8%) from the 1,464 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 209 (+16.7%) from the 1,255 counted in the 1990 Census.

The township was created around 1713 through a royal patent. The township was created by Royal charter on January 22, 1750, from Greenwich Township, while the area was part of Morris County. It became part of the newly created Sussex County on June 8, 1753. Parts of Hardwick Township were taken on November 11, 1782, to form Independence Township. Hardwick Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. On November 20, 1824, most of Hardwick Township was transferred to form part of Warren County, with the remainder staying in Sussex County as parts of Green Township and Stillwater Township, which were both created as of December 27, 1824. Frelinghuysen Township was created March 7, 1848, from portions of the township. The township was named for Philip Yorke, 1st Earl of Hardwicke.

The now-defunct Pahaquarry Township was dissolved and absorbed by Hardwick Township on July 2, 1997. Pahaquarry Township had been created on March 14, 1825, and received its name from the word "Pahaquarra", which was a derivation of the Native American word Pahaqualong used by the Lenape meaning "termination of two mountains" (describing the mountain or mountainous area that was the area's southern border) or "the place between the mountains beside the waters".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 37.923 square miles (98.221 km2), including 36.601 square miles (94.797 km2) of land and 1.322 square miles (3.425 km2) of water (3.49%). The part of the township east of the Kittatinny Ridge (the part excluding the now defunct Pahaquarry Township) is located in the Kittatinny Valley which is a section of the Great Appalachian Valley that stretches for 700 miles (1,100 km) from Canada to Alabama. The defunct Pahaquarry section of the Township which borders the Delaware River is located in the Minisink Valley that extends from the Delaware Water Gap north to Port Jervis, New York.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bass Lake, Franklin Grove, Hardwick, Hardwick Center, Millbrook, Newbakers Corner, Sand Pond, Squares Corner and White Pond.

Flickr - Nicholas T - Banded
Mount Tammany in Hardwick and Knowlton Townships

Sunfish Pond is a 44-acre (18 ha) glacial lake surrounded by a 258-acre (104 ha) hardwood forest located on the Kittatinny Ridge within Worthington State Forest, adjacent to the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. The Appalachian Trail runs alongside the western and northern edges of the lake, which was created by the Wisconsin Glacier during the last ice age. The lake was declared a National Natural Landmark in January 1970.

Camp Ralph S. Mason is a YMCA, established in 1900, that covers 460 acres (190 ha) adjacent to the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area that serves approximately 800 campers in its summer camp programs and 7,000 participants at its outdoor center.

The Pahaquarry Copper Mine is an abandoned copper mine. Active mining was attempted for brief periods during the mid-eighteenth, mid-nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries but was never successful. The site is administed by the National Park Service.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1810 2,528
1820 2,335 −7.6%
1830 1,962 * −16.0%
1840 1,957 −0.3%
1850 727 * −62.9%
1860 792 8.9%
1870 638 −19.4%
1880 583 −8.6%
1890 503 −13.7%
1900 400 −20.5%
1910 405 1.3%
1920 352 −13.1%
1930 331 −6.0%
1940 367 10.9%
1950 370 0.8%
1960 370 0.0%
1970 548 48.1%
1980 947 72.8%
1990 1,235 30.4%
2000 1,464 * 18.5%
2010 1,696 15.8%
Est. 2015 1,667 13.9%
Population sources:
1810-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Territory chg. in previous decade.

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,696 people, 573 households, and 453.2 families residing in the township. The population density was 46.3 per square mile (17.9/km2). There were 619 housing units at an average density of 16.9 per square mile (6.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 96.99% (1,645) White, 0.94% (16) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.65% (11) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.71% (12) from other races, and 0.71% (12) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.95% (67) of the population.

There were 573 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.9% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.9% were non-families. 16.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township, the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 19.3% from 25 to 44, 35.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 92.3 males. The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $96,094 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,827) and the median family income was $105,469 (+/- $14,654). Males had a median income of $77,045 (+/- $8,432) versus $46,667 (+/- $3,953) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,377 (+/- $5,353). About 3.0% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,464 people, 502 households, and 410 families residing in the township. The population density was 40.1 people per square mile (15.5/km²). There were 530 housing units at an average density of 14.5 per square mile (5.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.06% White, 0.61% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.89% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.32% of the population.

There were 502 households out of which 38.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.3% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.3% were non-families. 13.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the township the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 29.1% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $72,167, and the median income for a family was $76,111. Males had a median income of $56,000 versus $31,875 for females. The per capita income for the township was $30,038. About 0.5% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.5% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 41.74 miles (67.17 km) of roadways, of which 28.55 miles (45.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 11.68 miles (18.80 km) by Warren County, 1.01 miles (1.63 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.50 miles (0.80 km) by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission.

The only major roads that pass through are County Route 521 in the eastern part and Interstate 80 in the very west. The portion of I-80 also includes part of the Delaware Water Gap Toll Bridge which connects to Pennsylvania.

Old Mine Road, a scenic road that runs along the Delaware River, is said to be among the oldest roads in the Northeast used for the business purposes. It originates in Hardwick at I-80 and continues to the northeast into Walpack Township.

Popular culture

The original Friday the 13th movie was filmed in Hardwick's local Boy Scout Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco.


Hardwick Township, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.