Stillwater Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Stillwater Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Stillwater
Casper and Abraham Shafer Grist Mill Complex
Casper and Abraham Shafer Grist Mill Complex
Map of Stillwater Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Map of Stillwater Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stillwater Township
Census Bureau map of Stillwater Township
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated December 27, 1824
Area
 • Total 28.385 sq mi (73.515 km2)
 • Land 27.061 sq mi (70.087 km2)
 • Water 1.324 sq mi (3.428 km2)  4.66%
Area rank 95th of 566 in state
8th of 24 in county
Elevation 718 ft (219 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,099
 • Estimate (2015) 3,922
 • Rank 408th of 566 in state
12th of 24 in county
 • Density 151.5/sq mi (58.5/km2)
 • Density rank 523rd of 566 in state
20th of 24 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07875
Area code 973
FIPS code 34-70890
GNIS ID 882262
Website www.stillwatertownshipnj.com

Stillwater Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. Located in the Kittatinny Valley, Stillwater is a rural farming community with a long history of dairy farming. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,099.

Stillwater was settled in the eighteenth century by Palatine German immigrants who entered through the port of Philadelphia. In 1741, Casper Shafer, John George Wintermute (Windemuth), and their father-in-law Johan Peter Bernhardt settled along the Paulins Kill. For the next 50 years, the village of Stillwater was essentially German, centered on a union church shared by Lutheran and German Reformed (Calvinist) congregations. The German population assimilated by the early nineteenth century, but evidence of their settlement remains in the architecture of the grist mills, lime kilns, and stone houses located throughout the valley. Stillwater was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 27, 1824, from portions of Hardwick Township when Sussex County was divided in half by the legislature a few weeks earlier to create Warren County. Portions of the township were taken to form Fredon Township on February 24, 1904.

In 2008, New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Stillwater Township as its 40th best place to live in its annual rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

History

The township was created on December 27, 1824, by an act passed by the New Jersey Legislature.

A prominent structure in the area's history is the Shafer Grist Mill. Originally built by Casper Shafer in 1741, it was moved approximately a half mile to its present location in 1764. It was rebuilt in 1844 and powered by water from the Paulins Kill. Casper's son, Nathan Armstrong Shafer lived in Whitehall Manor, which he built near what is now the center of the village. The gristmill operated commercially until 1955, making it one of the oldest, continuously operating, water-powered gristmills in the State of New Jersey. Aline Murray Kilmer, the widow of poet Joyce Kilmer, lived the last decade of her life at Whitehall, passing away there on October 1, 1941.

In the early 1900s, Swartswood Lake became a major resort. Weekenders took the train into nearby Blairstown through the 1940s to stay at such places as the North Shore Inn, The Casino, and The Dove Island Inn (now a private home). Later, summer cabins became popular with Brooklyn weekenders.

The Stillwater creamery was built in 1910. Borden, Inc. later took control of the creamery.

In the 1920s, the Paulinskill River was dammed to create Paulinskill Lake and many summer residences sprang up. These summer cottages have grown into what is now a year-round community.

The Presbyterian Church is the most prominent feature in Stillwater village. Opposite the church is the former Stillwater Academy, an old schoolhouse that is now home to the Stillwater Historical Museum. Stillwater was, and still is, primarily agricultural. The area is dotted with lime kilns, which used to burn lime to enrich the soil, but are now obsolete, becoming lost to history and the overgrowth of vegetation. An intact kiln still exists on Millbrook Road, a little more than two miles (3 km) from Stillwater village.

Roughly one-third of Stillwater Township's area was ceded to create Fredon Township in 1904.

Geography

Swartswood Lake Stillwater Township New Jersey
Swartswood Lake is the third-largest freshwater lake in New Jersey

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 28.385 square miles (73.515 km2), including 27.061 square miles (70.087 km2) of land and 1.324 square miles (3.428 km2) of water (4.66%).

The township borders the Sussex County municipalities of Fredon Township, Hampton Township and Walpack Township; and both Frelinghuysen Township and Hardwick Township in Warren County.

Neighborhoods

Crandon Lakes (with a 2010 Census population of 496 in Stillwater Township, out of a CDP total of 1,178) is a unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) split between Hampton Township and Stillwater Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Catfish Pond, Duck Pond, Fairview Lake, Five Points, Lake Kathryn, Middleville, Mud Pond, Paulins Kill Lake, Quick Pond, Stillwater, Swartswood, Swartswood Lake and Wintermutes Foundry.

Stillwater is a small one-street village in the area that was first settled by Johan Peter Bernhardt and his two sons-in-law, John George Wintermute and Caspar Shafer. At the western terminus of end of Main Street where it meets County Route 521, the First Presbyterian Church of Stillwater is the dominant feature. As Main Street travels east, the Stillwater General Store (originally Garris's General Store) (1876), "Whitehall" (built in 1785 by Abraham Shafer), Casper Shafer's stonehouse (c. 1741), crossing the Paulins Kill near Shafer's grist mill (1764, 1844) and miller's house. An 1820 hostelry, the Stillwater Inn, recently was destroyed by fire. One half-mile (800 m) south of the Presbyterian church, is John George Wintermute's stonehouse (1755), his son Peter's stonehouse (1791). Located adjacent is Stillwater Cemetery—the site of the original Lutheran-Calvinist union church (1771-1838), the graves of the towns earliest settlers, and many eighteenth century ethnic German gravestones.

Geology

Flanked to the west by Kittatinny Mountain, the Stillwater Township is located within the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province, and the entire township is within the Kittatinny Valley a region of rolling hills and flat valley floors that is a section of the larger Great Appalachian Valley running 700 miles (1,100 km) from eastern Canada to northern Alabama. Elevations in this valley range from 400 to 1,000 feet (120–300 m). According to Snell, "The surface of the country is generally uneven and hilly, and on the west exceedingly rugged and mountainous. Ponds and watercourses abound. Of the latter, the most important is the Paulinskill, a millstream of considerable consequence." All of Stillwater Township is located in the Paulins Kill watershed which flows southwest through Sussex and Warren counties before joining the Delaware River near Columbia, New Jersey. The valley floor is part of the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation (shale and slate) which make up most of the valley—and the Jacksonburg Formation (mostly limestone).

Climate

Weather chart for Stillwater Township, New Jersey
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.2
 
36
17
 
 
2.9
 
40
19
 
 
3.7
 
48
27
 
 
4
 
61
37
 
 
4.1
 
71
47
 
 
4.8
 
79
56
 
 
4.4
 
84
61
 
 
4.3
 
83
59
 
 
4.5
 
75
51
 
 
4.1
 
64
39
 
 
3.7
 
53
31
 
 
3.4
 
41
23
temperatures in °F
precipitation totals in inches
source: The Weather Channel

Stillwater Township is located in Northwestern New Jersey which has a humid continental climate (microthermal)—a cooler climate due to its higher elevations.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 1,381
1840 1,476 6.9%
1850 1,742 18.0%
1860 1,816 4.2%
1870 1,632 −10.1%
1880 1,502 −8.0%
1890 1,296 −13.7%
1900 1,108 −14.5%
1910 796 * −28.2%
1920 671 −15.7%
1930 706 5.2%
1940 679 −3.8%
1950 816 20.2%
1960 1,339 64.1%
1970 2,158 61.2%
1980 3,887 80.1%
1990 4,253 9.4%
2000 4,267 0.3%
2010 4,099 −3.9%
Est. 2015 3,922 −4.3%
Population sources:
1830-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,099 people, 1,553 households, and 1,141 families residing in the township. The population density was 151.5 per square mile (58.5/km2). There were 1,930 housing units at an average density of 71.3 per square mile (27.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 97.07% (3,979) White, 0.66% (27) Black or African American, 0.05% (2) Native American, 0.71% (29) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.20% (8) from other races, and 1.29% (53) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.20% (90) of the population.

There were 1,553 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the township, the population was spread out with 21.9% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 36.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 97.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 100.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,367 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,830) and the median family income was $94,900 (+/- $17,365). Males had a median income of $50,600 (+/- $10,895) versus $52,587 (+/- $7,700) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,147 (+/- $2,398). About 7.0% of families and 7.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,267 people, 1,494 households, and 1,154 families residing in the township. The population density was 157.3 people per square mile (60.7/km2). There were 2,030 housing units at an average density of 74.9 per square mile (28.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.96% White, 0.16% African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.23% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.09% of the population.

There were 1,494 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.6% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 17.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $63,750, and the median income for a family was $71,563. Males had a median income of $48,580 versus $35,505 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,933. About 1.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 60.77 miles (97.80 km) of roadways, of which 39.87 miles (64.16 km) were maintained by the municipality and 20.90 miles (33.64 km) by Sussex County.

Local attractions

Parks and recreation

Stillwater is the home of Swartswood State Park, established in 1914 as the first state park established by the state of New Jersey. In the center of the park lies the Little Swartswood and Swartswood Lake. The park is operated and maintained by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry.


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