Crocker, Missouri facts for kids

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Crocker, Missouri
City
Location of Crocker, Missouri
Location of Crocker, Missouri
Country United States
State Missouri
County Pulaski
Area
 • Total 1.24 sq mi (3.21 km2)
 • Land 1.24 sq mi (3.21 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,129 ft (344 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,110
 • Estimate (2012) 1,121
 • Density 895.2/sq mi (345.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 65452
Area code(s) 573
FIPS code 29-17344
GNIS feature ID 0716505

Crocker is a city in Pulaski County, Missouri, United States. The population was 1,110 at the 2010 census.

History

Crocker was platted in 1869, and named after a railroad promoter. A post office called Crocker has been in operation since 1872.

Geography

Crocker is located at (37.949542, -92.265660).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.24 square miles (3.21 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1920 506
1930 522 3.2%
1940 453 −13.2%
1950 712 57.2%
1960 821 15.3%
1970 814 −0.9%
1980 979 20.3%
1990 1,077 10.0%
2000 1,033 −4.1%
2010 1,110 7.5%
Est. 2015 1,071 3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,110 people, 433 households, and 278 families residing in the city. The population density was 895.2 inhabitants per square mile (345.6/km2). There were 525 housing units at an average density of 423.4 per square mile (163.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.9% White, 0.5% African American, 0.8% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.8% of the population.

There were 433 households of which 39.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.5% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.8% were non-families. 31.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.21.

The median age in the city was 33.5 years. 29.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.5% were from 25 to 44; 23.1% were from 45 to 64; and 13.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.8% male and 50.2% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,033 people, 425 households, and 277 families residing in the city. The population density was 868.4 people per square mile (335.2/km²). There were 517 housing units at an average density of 434.6 per square mile (167.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.29% White, 0.29% African American, 1.36% Native American, 0.39% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.68% of the population.

There were 425 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.8% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.4% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 16.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,583, and the median income for a family was $35,750. Males had a median income of $26,964 versus $16,141 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,401. About 13.9% of families and 17.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.1% of those under age 18 and 19.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Waynesville Regional Airport at Forney Field serves the community with air service; even though it's on Fort Leonard Wood, it is jointly run by the cities of Waynesville and St. Robert and is available for civilian use by private pilots and scheduled commercial passenger service.

The major east-west route is I-44.svg Interstate 44; before that, the main highway was US 66.svg U.S. Route 66, which still exists as a scenic route through the area and passes through Devil's Elbow, St. Robert, Waynesville, Buckhorn, and Hazelgreen. Names for U.S. Route 66 vary - at different places, it's called Teardrop Road, Highway Z, Old Route 66, Historic Route 66, and Highway 17. State-posted signs mark most of the alignment of the road.

Major north-south routes near Crocker include:

  • MO-133.svg Route 133 runs north from Interstate 44 exit 145 about two miles east of Hazelgreen to Richland, Swedeborg, Crocker, and about two miles west of Dixon, then north out of the county.
  • MO-17.svg Route 17 crosses Interstate 44 at exit 153 at Buckhorn, runs east through Waynesville, turns north to Crocker, and then runs north out of the county to Iberia. South of Interstate 44, Highway 17 hugs the western edge of Fort Leonard Wood, passes near Laquey, and circles south of the post until it runs out of the county and eventually joins Highway 32 in Roby.
  • MO-supp-T.svg Highway T runs north from Highway 17 at Waynesville to Swedeborg, where it meets and ends at Highway 133 about halfway between Richland and Crocker.

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