Long Branch, New Jersey facts for kids

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Long Branch, New Jersey
City
City of Long Branch
Church of the Presidents
Church of the Presidents
Nickname(s): The First Seaside Resort
Motto: Tide In
Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in New Jersey.
Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Long Branch, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Long Branch, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 11, 1867 (as Long Branch Commission)
Reincorporated April 8, 1903 (as city)
Named for "long branch" of Shrewsbury River
Area
 • Total 6.283 sq mi (16.274 km2)
 • Land 5.274 sq mi (13.660 km2)
 • Water 1.009 sq mi (2.614 km2)  16.06%
Area rank 251st of 566 in state
17th of 53 in county
Elevation 23 ft (7 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 30,719
 • Estimate (2015) 30,941
 • Rank 71st of 566 in state
6th of 53 in county
 • Density 5,824.4/sq mi (2,248.8/km2)
 • Density rank 88th of 566 in state
9th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07740
Area code(s) 732/848
FIPS code 3402541310
GNIS feature ID 0885285
Website www.visitlongbranch.com

Long Branch is a beach side city in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 30,719, reflecting a decline of 621 (-2.0%) from the 31,340 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,682 (+9.4%) from the 28,658 counted in the 1990 Census.

Long Branch was formed on April 11, 1867, as the Long Branch Commission, from portions of Ocean Township. Long Branch was incorporated as a city by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 8, 1903, based on the results of a referendum, replacing the Long Branch Commission.

History

FWPNW026LongBranch1650A
Long Branch station, 1873
Brooklyn Museum - The Beach at Long Branch - Winslow Homer - overall
The Beach at Long Branch - wood cut illustration by Winslow Homer (1869)

Long Branch was a beach resort town in the late 18th century, named for its location along a branch of the South Shrewsbury River. In the 19th century it was a "Hollywood" of the east, where some of the greatest theatrical and other performers of the day gathered and performed. It was visited by presidents Chester A. Arthur, James A. Garfield, Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison, Rutherford B. Hayes, William McKinley, and Woodrow Wilson. Seven Presidents Park, a park near the beach, is named in honor of their visits. The Church of the Presidents, where all seven worshiped, is the only structure left in Long Branch associated with them.

Long Branch Beach New Jersey by David Shankbone
Long Branch Beach

President Garfield was brought to Long Branch in the hope that the fresh air and quiet might aid his recovery after being shot on July 2, 1881, an incident that left the assassin's bullet lodged in his spine. He died here on September 19, 1881, exactly two months before his 50th birthday. The Garfield Tea House, constructed from railroad ties that had been laid to carry Garfield's train, is in Elberon.

The famous Long Branch Saloon of the American Old West, located in Dodge City, Kansas, was given its name by its first owner, William Harris, who had moved west from Long Branch, New Jersey, his hometown.

Originally a resort town with a few hotels and large estates and many farms in the early 20th century, Long Branch grew in population. Italian, Irish and Jewish immigrants settled in during this period. By the 1950s, Long Branch like many other towns had developed new residential spots and housing to make room for the growing population. Many of the former farms of Long Branch were transformed into residential suburbs. Many of the estates and a few old historic resorts (with the addition of many new ones) still remain.

With the ascendancy of Hollywood in California as a film capital, Long Branch lost much of its activity as a theater spot. In addition, the opening of the Garden State Parkway in the mid-1950s allowed shore visitors to access points further south, which added to Long Branch's decline. The civil unrest of the 1960s caused riots in neighboring Asbury Park, and many fled the shore cities for the suburban towns west of the beach. Decades later, the older, more dilapidated parts of the resort town were condemned and redeveloped, in part by using eminent domain legislation.

Long Branch still continues to be a popular resort area. Many people from New York City travel or settle into the area to escape the crowded city and enjoy Long Branch's beaches. The area also attracts some tourists from the Philadelphia area as well.

Hurricane Sandy

On October 29, 2012, Long Branch was one of many shore communities that were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Although Sandy's winds were powerful, Long Branch's position between Long Beach Island and Sea Bright gave Long Branch a much larger wall of security because it could not be engulfed by surrounding waters. Despite this mainland advantage, there were still several instances of flooding in Long Branch during the storm. Many residents went without electricity for 9 to 15 days. The boardwalk was destroyed and the city plans to start rebuilding it in 2015 and finish by summer of 2016. It is the last boardwalk damaged by Sandy to be rebuilt, and is planned to match that of Pier Village.

Geography

Long Branch takes its name from the "long branch" or south branch of the Shrewsbury River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 6.283 square miles (16.274 km2), including 5.274 square miles (13.660 km2) of land and 1.009 square miles (2.614 km2) of water (16.06%).

The city borders the Monmouth County communities of Deal, Monmouth Beach, Ocean Township, Oceanport and West Long Branch.

Neighborhoods

Long Branch NJ Beach
Long Branch, NJ Beach
Long Branch NJ Pier Village
Pier Village at Long Branch, NJ

There are several distinct neighborhoods and areas in the City of Long Branch, each with its own character. Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the city include Branchport, East Long Branch, Elberon (served as ZIP code 07740), Hollywood, Kensington Park, North Long Branch, Pleasure Bay and West End. Other areas include North End (once known as "Atlanticville"), Beachfront North and South (including Pier Village, adjacent to the site of the former Long Branch Pier at the foot of Laird Street), Downtown and Uptown. As the city's redevelopment initiatives continue to expand, the lower Broadway area (a portion of the city's Downtown) will become an Arts District.

In years past, Long Branch was a major destination for beachgoers, along with Asbury Park, and enjoyed an upscale connotation with tourists. Long Branch is home to Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park, named for the United States presidents who visited the fashionable resort town, including Ulysses S. Grant, Chester A. Arthur, Rutherford Hayes, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, Woodrow Wilson and James Garfield.

Long Branch's fame as the Nation's First Seaside Resort waned in the years following World War II. The defining moment marking the end of this era occurred on June 8, 1987 when the largest fire in the history of the city destroyed the landmark amusement pier and adjoining Haunted Mansion, "Kid's World" Amusement Park and other businesses.

Planned development

Broadway Center is a planned entertainment and commercial hub of Long Branch, as envisioned by the City Government and Thompson Design Group, who created the Master Plan for the city. This complex is planned to offer retail shops, cafes, bars, restaurants and two performing arts theaters as well as 500 new residences sitting atop a 1,500 car parking garage. It will be designed by the architectural firms of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum (HOK).

In June 2013, the city approved designation of the area around its train station as a transit village, which can bring incentives for revitalization and denser development.

There are several mid-rise buildings lining the oceanfront. In December 2013 another 12-story residential project was approved.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 3,833
1890 7,231 88.7%
1900 8,872 22.7%
1910 13,298 49.9%
1920 13,521 1.7%
1930 18,399 36.1%
1940 17,408 −5.4%
1950 23,090 32.6%
1960 26,228 13.6%
1970 31,774 21.1%
1980 29,819 −6.2%
1990 28,658 −3.9%
2000 31,340 9.4%
2010 30,719 −2.0%
Est. 2015 30,941 0.7%
Population sources:
1880-1920 1880-1890
1890-1910 1880-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 30,719 people, 11,753 households, and 6,876 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,824.4 per square mile (2,248.8/km2). There were 14,170 housing units at an average density of 2,686.7 per square mile (1,037.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 65.30% (20,060) White, 14.21% (4,364) Black or African American, 0.55% (170) Native American, 2.13% (655) Asian, 0.08% (24) Pacific Islander, 13.24% (4,067) from other races, and 4.49% (1,379) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 28.07% (8,624) of the population.

There were 11,753 households out of which 26.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.2% were married couples living together, 15.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.5% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the city, the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.8 years. For every 100 females there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 98.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $52,792 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,549) and the median family income was $56,778 (+/- $4,202). Males had a median income of $36,404 (+/- $3,363) versus $33,397 (+/- $4,036) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,381 (+/- $2,212). About 11.5% of families and 14.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 31,340 people, 12,594 households, and 7,248 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,008.6 people per square mile (2,318.1/km2). There were 13,983 housing units at an average density of 2,680.9 per square mile (1,034.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 68.03% White, 18.66% African American, 0.36% Native American, 1.64% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 7.08% from other races, and 4.19% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.67% of the population.

There were 12,594 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.9% were married couples living together, 15.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.4% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,651, and the median income for a family was $42,825. Males had a median income of $37,383 versus $27,026 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,532. About 13.9% of families and 16.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.3% of those under age 18 and 13.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

The city had a total of 89.49 miles (144.02 km) of roadways, of which 80.10 miles (128.91 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.26 miles (10.07 km) by Monmouth County and 3.13 miles (5.04 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 36 and Route 71 pass through the city.

Public transportation

Long Branch is connected to New York City and Northern New Jersey via NJ Transit trains running on the North Jersey Coast Line. The Long Branch station, located three blocks away from the beach, marks the end of electrified trackage, with passengers continuing south must change to diesel-powered trains. A second station is located at Elberon district just north of the borough of Deal. In the past there were stops in the West End neighborhood and on Broadway, but they were closed to reduce travel time to New York City.

Local bus transportation is provided by NJ Transit on the 831 and 837 routes.

Additionally, the City has contracted with EZ Ride to provide a shuttle service during peak commuting hours connecting the train station with Monmouth University and the Pier Village in Long Branch.

In popular culture

  • The AXS TV reality series, Bikini Barbershop, is set in Long Branch, at Bikini Barbers located on Ocean Boulevard.
  • In the HBO series, The Sopranos, Long Branch is the setting for Adriana La Cerva's nightclub, the Crazy Horse (see "The Telltale Moozadell"). In the episode "The Blue Comet", the house in which Tony Soprano hides out towards the end of the series is near the beach in North Long Branch.

Images for kids


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