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Newfield, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Newfield
Map of Newfield highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Newfield highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Newfield, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Newfield, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 39°33′04″N 75°00′37″W / 39.551041°N 75.010217°W / 39.551041; -75.010217Coordinates: 39°33′04″N 75°00′37″W / 39.551041°N 75.010217°W / 39.551041; -75.010217
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated March 8, 1924
Government
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 1.74 sq mi (4.51 km2)
 • Land 1.74 sq mi (4.50 km2)
 • Water <0.01 sq mi (0.01 km2)  0.17%
Area rank 427th of 565 in state
19th of 24 in county
Elevation
118 ft (36 m)
Population
 • Total 1,553
 • Estimate 
(2019)
1,543
 • Rank 512th of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county
 • Density 912.0/sq mi (352.1/km2)
 • Density rank 397th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08344
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401551390
GNIS feature ID 0885319

Newfield is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,553, reflecting a decline of 63 (-3.9%) from the 1,616 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 24 (+1.5%) from the 1,592 counted in the 1990 Census.

Newfield was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1924, from portions of Franklin Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 1, 1924. In the weeks before the legislature approved the formation of the borough, a group of 240 residents traveled to Trenton by train to lobby on behalf of the creation of an independent municipality. The borough's name derives from its status as a new-field development.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.706 square miles (4.418 km2), including 1.703 square miles (4.410 km2) of land and 0.003 square miles (0.008 km2) of water (0.18%).

The borough borders Franklin Township and Cumberland County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 880
1940 889 1.0%
1950 1,010 13.6%
1960 1,299 28.6%
1970 1,487 14.5%
1980 1,563 5.1%
1990 1,592 1.9%
2000 1,616 1.5%
2010 1,553 −3.9%
2019 (est.) 1,543 −0.6%
Population sources:
1930-2000 1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,553 people, 579 households, and 453 families residing in the borough. The population density was 912.0 per square mile (352.1/km2). There were 626 housing units at an average density of 367.6 per square mile (141.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 94.66% (1,470) White, 2.19% (34) Black or African American, 0.26% (4) Native American, 0.32% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.97% (15) from other races, and 1.61% (25) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.57% (102) of the population.

There were 579 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.8% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $60,350 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,077) and the median family income was $67,045 (+/- $11,678). Males had a median income of $45,000 (+/- $6,268) versus $47,000 (+/- $8,386) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,924 (+/- $1,886). About 7.8% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,616 people, 596 households, and 470 families residing in the borough. The population density was 951.1 people per square mile (367.0/km2). There were 620 housing units at an average density of 364.7 per square mile (140.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.11% White, 1.30% African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 1.05% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.84% of the population.

There were 596 households, out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.0% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 24.4% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.8 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,875, and the median income for a family was $59,934. Males had a median income of $39,926 versus $28,750 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,063. About 5.5% of families and 6.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 12.06 miles (19.41 km) of roadways, of which 9.67 miles (15.56 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.27 miles (3.65 km) by Gloucester County and 0.12 miles (0.19 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus service is available between Millville and Philadelphia on the 408 route.

Education

Newfield is a non-operating school district. In June 2009, the New Jersey Department of Education ruled that Newfield could end its relationship with the Buena Regional School District and as of the 2011–12 school year could start sending incoming high school students in grades 7–9 to Delsea Regional High School.

Students in public school for kindergarten through sixth grade attend the Franklin Township Public Schools, as part of a sending/receiving relationship in which Newfield accounts for about 100 of the more than 1,400 students in the district. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,408 students and 114.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1. Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Mary F. Janvier Elementary School with 597 students in grades K-2, Main Road School with 394 students in grades 3-4 and Caroline L. Reutter School with 406 students in grades 5-6.

For seventh through twelfth grades, students attend the Delsea Regional School District, which also serves students from both Elk Township and Franklin Township. Students from Newfield attend the district as part of a sending/receiving relationship begun in September 2010 after Newfield ended its prior relationship with the Buena Regional School District. As of the 2018–19 school year, the regional high school district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 1,661 students and 123.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.4:1. Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Delsea Regional Middle School with 563 students in grades 7 and 8, and Delsea Regional High School with 1,047 students in grades 9 - 12.

Edgarton Christian Academy is a non-denominational Christian K-8 school established in 2012. As of 2020 it leases a 29,000-square-foot (2,700 m2) space in Newfield. When the 76-student The Ellison School in Vineland closed in December 2019, 25 of them moved to Edgarton. The school is building a 50,000-square-foot (4,600 m2) permanent building on a 15-acre (6.1 ha) property in Buena, Atlantic County.

Notre Dame Regional School of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden had one of its two campuses in Newfield, with the other in Landisville in Buena. The school closed in 2012. It had 270 students at the time of closure. That year remnants of the school formed the non-Catholic Edgarton Christian Academy. 263 of the former Notre Dame students moved to Edgarton.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Newfield include:

  • Job Bicknell Ellis (1829–1905), mycologist known for his collection and classification of fungi.
  • Herbert Fortier (1867–1949), a Canadian-born actor of the silent era.
  • Bessie Blount Griffin (1914-2009), physical therapist and inventor

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