Novi, Michigan facts for kids

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Novi
City
City of Novi
Novi Civic Center
Novi Civic Center
Official seal of Novi
Seal
Location in the state of Michigan
Location in the state of Michigan
Country United States
State Michigan
County Oakland
Area
 • Total 31.28 sq mi (81.01 km2)
 • Land 30.26 sq mi (78.37 km2)
 • Water 1.02 sq mi (2.64 km2)
Elevation 909 ft (277 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 55,214
 • Estimate (2014) 58,416
 • Density 1,825.0/sq mi (704.6/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 48167,48374-48377
Area code(s) 248
FIPS code 26-59440
GNIS feature ID 0633773
Website cityofnovi.org

Novi (/ˈnv/ NOH-vy) is a city in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 55,224, an increase over the 2000 census count of 47,386. The city is located approximately 25 miles (40 km) northwest of the center of Detroit, and about 8 miles (13 km) west of the western border of Detroit. It is about 25 miles (40 km) northeast of the center of Ann Arbor. The city is located within the boundaries of the survey township of Novi Township. The remaining unincorporated township is only a tiny fraction surrounded by the city.

History

Novi Special Water Tower
Water tower in Novi, noting "Birthplace Novi Special"

Novi was originally a township organized in 1832 from Farmington Township. The name Novi was offered by resident Dr. J. C. Emery, at the suggestion of his wife. Residents were reportedly looking for a shorter name than Farmington.

One misconception is that it was named after the 6th toll gate (No. VI) on the Grand River toll road. However, the township was named in 1832 and the toll road was not constructed until the 1850s. A similar claim is made about the township being stop number 6 on the railroad. However, the Holly, Wayne & Monroe Railway (now CSX Transportation) was not constructed through the township until 1870–71, almost 40 years after the township was named. A third popular misconception is that Novi was the sixth stagecoach stop outside of Detroit.

Novi was incorporated as a city in 1969 after the approval of a city charter on February 18, 1969 by Village of Novi voters. The approval of the charter followed an election on May 20, 1968 where voters approved the incorporation of the city on a vote of 694 in favor and 283 votes against. The charter became effective on February 24, 1969. The approval of incorporation and the city charter followed several previous attempts at incorporation that were rejected by Novi voters. The city was incorporated along the boundaries of the existing Village of Novi.

Historic sites

  • The historic Township Hall was originally located on Novi Road, south of Grand River. It was moved to the Novi Library property in the 1980s. It was recently relocated again onto the property that was the site of the Jacob and Rebecca Fuerst Farmstead.
  • Tollgate Farm is a 160-acre (650,000 m²) farmstead and educational center.
  • The Colonel Samuel White Homestead site includes a Michigan Historical Marker.
  • There is a portion of the original Novi Depot, which was constructed in 1871 for the Holly, Wayne and Monroe Railroad (currently CSX Transportation).
  • The Jacob and Rebecca Fuerst Farmstead was once a historic site listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The City of Novi demolished the Fuerst Farmstead. The north barn was destroyed on July 16, 2008. The farm house was demolished in August 2008. The south and east barns were dismantled and removed from the site. None of the original buildings from the Farmstead were preserved on the site.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 31.28 square miles (81.01 km2), of which 30.26 square miles (78.37 km2) is land and 1.02 square miles (2.64 km2) is water.

The city is located on Walled Lake. Walled Lake, which lies mainly within Novi, is the largest lake in the city. It also serves as the headwaters of the Middle Branch of the Rouge River. Shawood Lake lies southwest of Walled Lake. Several smaller lakes within the city were created by gravel pit mining or as stormwater retention areas. Most of the city lies within the Rouge River watershed. Some areas on the north and west side of the city are part of the Huron River watershed.

Three major freeways in the city converge in Novi. The city's location provides direct access to several major freeways including I-96, I-696, I-275 and M-5.

Parks and recreation

Most of the farmland and open spaces present in the mid-20th century have been developed. The exceptions include the Tollgate Farm located at the northwest corner of the intersection of Twelve Mile and Meadowbrook Roads. This farmstead is owned by the Americana Foundation and is currently leased and operated by Michigan State University as an agricultural extension. Lakeshore Park is another prominent natural area. The park is located between Walled Lake and Twelve Mile Road, west of Novi Road. While portions of the park were turned over to a developer to settle a lawsuit, it remains one of the largest municipal parks in southeast Michigan. Ella Mae Power Park, located behind the Novi Civic Center, hosts softball and baseball games and tournaments.

In 2004, the City of Novi negotiated for the donation of several parcels of parkland on the west side of the city. These properties, along with several adjoining parcels owned by the city, preserve 253 acres (1.02 km2) of environmentally sensitive areas in the Huron River watershed. In 2005, the City of Novi was awarded a Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund (MNRTF) grant to acquire 54 acres (22 ha) two areas of environmentally sensitive property in southeast Novi within the Rouge River watershed. The properties were acquired in 2009. In 2007, the City was awarded a second MNRTF grant to acquire 16 acres (65,000 m2) of natural area in southwest Novi within the headwaters of the Huron River watershed. The property was acquired in 2010. In 2010, the City was awarded a third MNRTF grant to develop the city-owned property on the south end of Walled Lake, once the site of the Walled Lake Casino and Amusement Park, into a public park. That property is now the Pavilion Shore Park

Each year the Japan Festival is held in the city. It is the largest Japan festival in the state.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 9,668
1980 22,525 133.0%
1990 32,998 46.5%
2000 47,386 43.6%
2010 55,224 16.5%
Est. 2015 58,723 6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 55,224 people, 22,258 households, and 14,599 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,825.0 inhabitants per square mile (704.6/km2). There were 24,226 housing units at an average density of 800.6 per square mile (309.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 73.0% White, 8.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 15.9% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 3.0% of the population.

There were 22,258 households of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.4% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 39.1 years. 25.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28% were from 25 to 44; 28.6% were from 45 to 64; and 11.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

2000 census

In 2000, there were 18,726 households out of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.2% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.2% were non-families. 28.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the city in 2000, the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 35.7% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city in 2000 was $71,918, and the median income for a family was $91,369 (These figures had risen to $78,151 and $101,286 respectively according to a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $65,590 versus $38,432 for females. The per capita income for the city was $35,992. About 1.6% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 2.7% of those age 65 or over.

Japanese population

See also: History of the Japanese in Metro Detroit

As of 2011 15.9% of its residents were Asian, and Novi had 2,438 Japanese residents, giving it the largest Japanese population of any Michigan municipality. By 2011 the Japanese population experienced an increase of 53% from 2003, when the city had 1,417 Japanese residents. The economic director of the City of Novi, Ara Topouzian, said "We've been told often by the consulate-general's office or other Japanese officials that they refer to Novi as Little Tokyo because we've been very warm and welcoming and accommodating." Many Japanese in Novi are in the United States on temporary visas which last for three to five years. According to Dr. Andrew Vosburgh of the St. John Providence Health System, many Japanese in Novi work in development, engineering, and research. Their workplaces are located in and around several cities including Novi, Ann Arbor, and Springfield Township. As of April 2013 there are 2,666 Japanese nationals who live in Novi.

The Novi Public Library has Japanese content in the adult and children's sections. The Novi Community School District has enrollment information and other documents available in Japanese. The websites of the City of Novi, the Novi Public Library, and St. John Providence Park Hospital have Japanese welcome messages. The Novi Kroger and the Staybridge Suites extended stay hotel cater to Japanese customers. The hotel stated in 2011 that Japanese make up 30% of its customers, and had increased in a two-year span ending in 2011. The city also has Japanese cultural activities and cultural activities offered in Japanese, including horseback riding lessons conducted in the Japanese language and a Japanese movie night. The hospital offers cultural awareness training for employees, documents translated in Japanese, Japanese translators, and yoga classes conducted in Japanese.

In the 1990s several Japanese automobile firms had opened offices along M-14. Nissan Motor Co. opened its Farmington Hills office in November 1991. In addition, Toyota established a technical center in Ann Arbor. Novi had gained several Japanese restaurants by the mid-1990s. In summer 2011, the Japanese School of Detroit moved to Novi from Birmingham.

Indian/South Asian population

See also: History of the Asian Indians in Metro Detroit

The 2008 CNN/Money "Best Places to Live" stated that the city had a significant Asian Indian population. According to the 2000 U.S. Census there were 1,278 ethnic Asian Indians in Novi.

The 25,000-square-foot (2,300 m2) Sri Venkateswara Temple and Cultural Center (SVTCC), built for $10 million, opened in 2013. It is the first Michigan Hindu temple to be named after a southern Indian deity. It had a temporary location for five years before it opened its permanent facility. As of 2013 the temple has a client base of about 3,000 people. The community operating the temple mostly comes from the Indians who speak Telugu. Many of them originate from Andhra Pradesh.

Sister cities

  • Flag of Japan.svg Owani, Japan

Coordinates: 42°28′50″N 83°28′32″W / 42.48056°N 83.47556°W / 42.48056; -83.47556

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