Union Beach, New Jersey facts for kids

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Union Beach, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Union Beach
Map of Union Beach in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Union Beach in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Union Beach, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Union Beach, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 16, 1925
Area
 • Total 1.889 sq mi (4.894 km2)
 • Land 1.804 sq mi (4.673 km2)
 • Water 0.085 sq mi (0.221 km2)  4.52%
Area rank 422nd of 566 in state
33rd of 53 in county
Elevation 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 6,245
 • Estimate (2015) 5,595
 • Rank 336th of 566 in state
26th of 53 in county
 • Density 3,461.5/sq mi (1,336.5/km2)
 • Density rank 185th of 566 in state
19th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07735
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402574540
GNIS feature ID 0885423
Website www.ubnj.net

Union Beach is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,245, reflecting a decline of 404 (-6.1%) from the 6,649 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 493 (+8.0%) from the 6,156 counted in the 1990 Census.

Union Beach was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 16, 1925, from portions of Raritan Township (now Hazlet), based on the results of a referendum held on April 16, 1925. A 100-acre (40 ha) farm in the future borough was owned by the Poole family since the days of the American Revolutionary War. Following the development of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, the Poole Farm became the site of the Union Subdivision in 1908, while an area that had been called East Point Beach Estates was renamed Union Beach by developer Charles Carr in 1920.

The borough is part of the Bayshore Regional Strategic Plan, an effort by nine municipalities in northern Monmouth County to reinvigorate the area's economy by emphasizing the traditional downtowns, dense residential neighborhoods, maritime history, and the natural beauty of the Raritan Bayshore coastline.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.889 square miles (4.894 km2), including 1.804 square miles (4.673 km2) of land and 0.085 square miles (0.221 km2) of water (4.52%).

Union Beach has undergone extensive restoration of its beach front, which offers a view of the New York City skyline and the Verazanno-Narrows Bridge.

A monument to the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, constructed of black stone and dedicated in June 2002, is positioned to allow visitors to see past the memorial towards the location where the World Trade Center towers were visible from the borough.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names within the borough include Lorrillard Beach, Natco, Union Gardens and Van Marters Corner.

The borough borders the Monmouth County municipalities of Hazlet, Keansburg and Keyport.

Natural disaster

On October 28, 2012, at 4:00pm, a mandatory evacuation was ordered for the entire borough was ordered by the mayor in preparation for Hurricane Sandy, the most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the second-costliest hurricane in United States history. Nearly a third of the borough's more than 6,200 residents had left by the time the worst of Hurricane Sandy had arrived.

By morning, the videos and photos seen on television and social media left the state and the entire world in shock. Of the estimated 2,143 households in the borough, approximately 200 homes and businesses were damaged, 400 took on an estimated 6 or more feet of water, 62 were "completely missing" with an additional 100 that had shifted off foundations and were no longer habitable. The boroughs police department initially had to borrow several police cruisers. Municipalities from as far away as Wilmington, NC and Clay County, Florida donated police cruisers. The majority cars were destroyed when flooding reached police headquarters. Former residents from around the country mobilized and organized relief efforts, sending relief supplies, including advising and assisting overwhelmed Union Beach public servants in acquiring replacements of lost emergency vehicles. The Municipality lost 14 police cars, 3 ambulances and 4 fire trucks. Madison Township and Wanaque each gave repurposed police cruisers fully decaled with Union Beach logos, as well as other relief. Some local agencies sold old police cruisers for one dollar each or donated police cars, and donations of two cars each came from North Carolina and Florida. EMS and fire trucks were also donated from near and far.

One of the many businesses in borough to be destroyed was Jakeabob's Bay. One of the major employers in town, the restaurant was a popular summer hangout with its waterfront tiki bar deck and views of the Manhattan skyline. On the morning of October 28 the restaurant was boarded up and prayers were said in hope that the bar that survived Hurricane Irene in 2011 will survive what was to become the most destructive storm in history. By morning, the building was completely destroyed. The storm surge had completely washed through the building, pushing out tables, chairs, menus and displays. The restaurant's famous deck was found blocks inland in a resident's front yard. Its owner, Gigi Liaguno-Dorr, immediately began to organize the relief and rebuilding efforts, but not for her restaurant, but for Union Beach. The building was eventually razed when neither of the insurance companies that covered the restaurant would pay out. Five months later, in April, a new temporary restaurant was able to open in a rented space further inland but still in town called "Jakeabob's Off the Bay". The main focus of the new location was Union Beach and its destruction by Hurricane Sandy. Liaguano-Dorr used the front doors from homes destroyed in the storm as tables and partitions in the restaurant. The walls were adorned with mementos donated by Union Beach residents and photographs from years past. After barely a year, it was announced that Jakeabob's Off the Bay would not be renewing its lease with the temporary location. After months of fighting with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and its insurance company, there wouldn't be enough money to keep operating without loans or the insurance to be paid out.

Union Beach Memorial School, the borough's only school, was inundated with floodwaters and debris when the storm surge and extreme high tide swept through the borough. "It was a disaster. There was just muck and mud everywhere, mulch all over the building," principal Brian Walsh had said in an interview. Hundreds of library books and teaching materials were destroyed along with thousands of dollars worth of instruments. Music teacher Marilouise Metz said she lost decades worth of memorabilia including pictures, photos, newspaper clippings. After several months or emergency repairs by volunteers, including students and teachers, the renovations including new floors, walls, desks and murals painted by teachers, students and volunteers were finished just in time to finish out the school year. The school had been used as an evacuation center but began taking on water as the storm raged.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,893
1940 2,076 9.7%
1950 3,636 75.1%
1960 5,862 61.2%
1970 6,472 10.4%
1980 6,354 −1.8%
1990 6,156 −3.1%
2000 6,649 8.0%
2010 6,245 −6.1%
Est. 2015 5,595 −10.4%
Population sources:1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 6,245 people, 2,143 households, and 1,624 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,461.5 per square mile (1,336.5/km2). There were 2,269 housing units at an average density of 1,257.7 per square mile (485.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 91.05% (5,686) White, 1.54% (96) Black or African American, 0.16% (10) Native American, 1.81% (113) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.09% (193) from other races, and 2.35% (147) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.98% (686) of the population.

There were 2,143 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.2% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 30.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,347 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,084) and the median family income was $76,744 (+/- $15,912). Males had a median income of $55,000 (+/- $5,759) versus $36,002 (+/- $3,887) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,982 (+/- $1,875). About 3.1% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 4.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 6,649 people, 2,143 households, and 1,722 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,545.1 people per square mile (1,365.5/km2). There were 2,229 housing units at an average density of 1,188.5 per square mile (457.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.45% White, 0.87% African American (U.S. Census), 0.20% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 1.35% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.09% of the population.

There were 2,143 households out of which 43.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.7% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.6% were non-families. 15.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.09 and the average family size was 3.44.

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 7.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 102.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.9 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $59,946, and the median income for a family was $65,179. Males had a median income of $45,688 versus $29,918 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,973. 4.8% of the population and 4.2% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 5.6% are under the age of 18 and 5.9% are 65 or older.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 25.60 miles (41.20 km) of roadways, of which 22.06 miles (35.50 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.93 miles (4.72 km) by Monmouth County and 0.61 miles (0.98 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 36 runs along the borough's southern border with Hazlet Township.

Public transportation

NJ Transit local bus service is available on the 817 route.

In popular culture

Union Beach was used as the eighth checkpoint of the titular race in the seventh part of the popular manga series, Jojo's Bizarre Adventure.


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