Wilmington, Ohio facts for kids

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Wilmington, Ohio
City
Clinton County Courthouse
Clinton County Courthouse
Motto: A Worthy Heritage, A Winning Future
Location of Wilmington, Ohio
Location of Wilmington, Ohio
Location of Wilmington in Clinton County
Location of Wilmington in Clinton County
Country United States
State Ohio
County Clinton
Established 1810
Area
 • Total 10.93 sq mi (28.31 km2)
 • Land 10.89 sq mi (28.20 km2)
 • Water 0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation 1,017 ft (310 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 12,520
 • Estimate (2012) 12,448
 • Density 1,149.7/sq mi (443.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45177
Area code(s) 937
FIPS code 39-85792
GNIS feature ID 1061792
Website www.ci.wilmington.oh.us

Wilmington is a city in and the county seat of Clinton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 12,520 at the 2010 census. At city entrances from state routes, county roads, and U.S. highways, the city slogan of "We Honor Our Champions" is seen, accompanied by signs that highlight various athletic accomplishments from Wilmington individuals and teams. The city is served by the Wilmington Public Library, and also features a weather forecast office of the National Weather Service, which serves all of Southwestern Ohio and portions of Kentucky and Indiana.

Wilmington was featured in Time magazine on December 8, 1997 as a small town that is attractive to suburban families. The city was also featured in a 1995 publication entitled The 100 Best Small Towns in America. Home to Wilmington College, founded in 1870 by the Society of Friends, the city and the surrounding area include more than a dozen Quaker meeting houses.

Wilmington is the setting of Michael Moore's 2016 documentary film, "Michael Moore in TrumpLand."

History

The town of Clinton was founded in 1810 as seat of the newly formed Clinton County; the name was changed to Wilmington in 1811. The village was incorporated in 1828.

In 1833, Wilmington contained a brick courthouse, a jail, fourteen stores, two taverns, two groceries, four churches, and 100 residential houses.

Gallery

Geography

Wilmington is located at 39°26′45″N 83°49′45″W / 39.44583°N 83.82917°W / 39.44583; -83.82917 (39.445913, -83.829128).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.93 square miles (28.31 km2), of which 10.89 square miles (28.20 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) is water.

Transportation

The city lies approximately 35 miles southeast of Dayton, 50 miles northeast of Cincinnati and 60 miles southwest of Columbus at the nexus of several routes that traverse Southwest Ohio. Wilmington is served by US Route 68, US Route 22/State Route 3, State Route 73, State Route 134 and State Route 730. The city does not have direct interstate access but is connected to Interstate 71 via US Route 68 and State Route 73.

Airborne Airpark serves as the city's airport. The airport sees substantial domestic and international cargo service but is not currently served by any commercial passenger services.

Freight railroad service is provided by the Indiana and Ohio Railway on a line owned by CSX Transportation between Cincinnati and Columbus.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 235
1830 616 162.1%
1840 784 27.3%
1850 1,238 57.9%
1860 915 −26.1%
1870 2,023 121.1%
1880 2,745 35.7%
1890 3,079 12.2%
1900 3,613 17.3%
1910 4,491 24.3%
1920 5,037 12.2%
1930 5,332 5.9%
1940 5,971 12.0%
1950 7,387 23.7%
1960 8,915 20.7%
1970 10,051 12.7%
1980 10,442 3.9%
1990 11,199 7.2%
2000 11,921 6.4%
2010 12,520 5.0%
Est. 2015 12,449 −0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census
2012 estimate

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 12,520 people, 5,072 households, and 2,995 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,149.7 inhabitants per square mile (443.9/km2). There were 5,827 housing units at an average density of 535.1 per square mile (206.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 88.3% White, 6.1% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.9% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.6% of the population.

There were 5,072 households of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.8% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.0% were non-families. 35.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 15% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the city was 33.7 years. 23.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 14.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.2% were from 25 to 44; 23% were from 45 to 64; and 14.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.7% male and 53.3% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 11,921 people, 4,867 households, and 2,929 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,599.9 people per square mile (617.8/km²). There were 5,284 housing units at an average density of 709.2 per square mile (273.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.66% White, 6.72% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 1.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population.

There were 4,867 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.7% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 15.8% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,880, and the median income for a family was $43,619. Males had a median income of $31,645 versus $22,627 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,346. About 8.9% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.6% of those under age 18 and 10.5% of those age 65 or over.

Culture and recreation

Wilmington is situated within one hour driving distance to Dayton, Cincinnati, and Columbus. In the mid 90's, the annual Banana Split Festival was started to commemorate the town's alleged creation of the famous treat in Wilmington in 1907. In addition, each year the city hosts the Clinton County Corn Festival, which pays homage to the agricultural tradition of the county. In 2007, a new festival, the Hometown Holidazzle, was started, taking place in the late fall. Aside from the annual events, Wilmington played host to a festival each year that a new Harry Potter book was released. Thousands would gather in downtown Wilmington at the Books 'N' More bookstore and surrounding businesses to celebrate each release.

Located in the downtown business district is the historic Murphy Theatre, which can be seen in the film Lost In Yonkers, part of which was filmed in the city in the early 1990s. The Murphy Theater stages productions throughout the year from various acts and ensembles as well as staging musicals and plays from neighboring school districts in the county. More recently, the Murphy is home to free screenings of classic movies, sponsored by a community group. The Murphy Theatre saw the marriage of actor John Ritter and wife Amy Yasbeck on September 18, 1999, with the marquee simply stating "Congratulations John and Amy." Nearby in downtown Wilmington is the historic General Denver Hotel, which is named in honor of General James W. Denver, founder of the city of Denver, Colorado. General James Denver is also buried in Wilmington.

NCAA sports

Wilmington is home to Wilmington College, a member of the Ohio Athletic Conference and participant in NCAA Division III sports. In 2004, the Wilmington College women's basketball team won the NCAA Women's Division III Basketball Championship, the most prestigious national title won by a Wilmington sport team.

Quakers vs. Otterbein at Williams
The Wilmington College Quakers take on the Otterbein Cardinals at Williams Stadium

In the summer of 2008, the Quakers football home, Williams Stadium, underwent a major renovation, with new stadium lights and artificial playing field installed.


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