Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Woodcliff Lake
Map highlighting Woodcliff Lake's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Woodcliff Lake's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated August 31, 1894, as Woodcliff
Renamed March 1, 1910, to Woodcliff Lake
Area
 • Total 3.606 sq mi (9.339 km2)
 • Land 3.405 sq mi (8.819 km2)
 • Water 0.201 sq mi (0.519 km2)  5.56%
Area rank 492nd of 566 in state
63rd of 70 in county
Elevation 230 ft (70 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 5,730
 • Estimate (2015) 5,917
 • Rank 358th of 566 in state
56th of 70 in county
 • Density 1,682.7/sq mi (649.7/km2)
 • Density rank 314th of 566 in state
60th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07677
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400382300
GNIS feature ID 0885449
Website www.wclnj.com

Woodcliff Lake is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the borough's population was 5,730, reflecting a decline of 15 (-0.3%) from the 5,745 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 442 (+8.3%) from the 5,303 counted in the 1990 Census. Most of the borough mandates a minimum lot size of 22,500 square feet (2,090 m2) for single-family homes, with portions on the borough's east zoned for 15,000 square feet (1,400 m2) and portions of the borough's northwest and southwest zoned for 30,000 square feet (2,800 m2) lots.

Woodcliff Lake is also the name of the reservoir that lies primarily within the borough, with a small portion at the southeastern edge located in neighboring Hillsdale.

History

The borough was originally incorporated as the Borough of Woodcliff, on August 31, 1894, from parts of Orvil Township and Washington Township, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier. The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone. The borough derives its name from the characteristics of its geography.

On March 1, 1910, after the creation of the reservoir, the name of the borough was changed to Woodcliff Lake, to match the name of the post office. Prior to the creation of ZIP codes as a way to uniquely identify addresses, United States Postal Service policy was that two post offices in a state could not have the same name, and there was already a "Woodcliff" in Hudson County. On January 1, 1956, and again on July 1, 1958, Woodcliff Lake exchanged sections of land with Park Ridge. On October 13, 1960, portions were exchanged with Hillsdale.

Woodcliff Lake has many historic houses and buildings, some dating from the 18th century. Many old buildings are also present, but are likely to have been modified through the years. The borough has seen intense development over the past 50 years, as virtually all areas available for construction have been developed.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.606 square miles (9.339 km2), including 3.405 square miles (8.819 km2) of land and 0.201 square miles (0.519 km2) of water (5.56%).

The borough is bordered by Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Hillsdale, Saddle River, and small portions of Upper Saddle River. Woodcliff Lake is located approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Manhattan.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 329
1910 470 42.9%
1920 587 24.9%
1930 871 48.4%
1940 1,037 19.1%
1950 1,420 36.9%
1960 2,742 93.1%
1970 5,506 100.8%
1980 5,644 2.5%
1990 5,303 −6.0%
2000 5,745 8.3%
2010 5,730 −0.3%
Est. 2015 5,917 3.3%
Population sources:
1900-1920 1900-1910
1910-1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 5,730 people, 1,916 households, and 1,600 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,682.7 per square mile (649.7/km2). There were 1,980 housing units at an average density of 581.5 per square mile (224.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 90.30% (5,174) White, 0.82% (47) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 6.47% (371) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.20% (69) from other races, and 1.20% (69) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.41% (310) of the population.

There were 1,916 households out of which 42.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.5% were non-families. 15.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 17.1% from 25 to 44, 33.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $150,404 (with a margin of error of +/- $25,298) and the median family income was $172,019 (+/- $32,763). Males had a median income of $105,045 (+/- $11,151) versus $65,119 (+/- $22,660) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $62,925 (+/- $7,887). About 1.1% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed five households in 2010, an increase from the one household counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 5,745 people, 1,824 households, and 1,605 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,725.3 people per square mile (666.1/km2). There were 1,842 housing units at an average density of 553.2 per square mile (213.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.84% White, 0.87% African American, 0.03% Native American, 4.47% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. 2.33% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,824 households out of which 47.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 80.2% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.0% were non-families. 10.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.08 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.9% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.1 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $123,022, and the median income for a family was $133,925. Males had a median income of $90,000 versus $45,150 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $53,461. 1.5% of the population and 0.9% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 1.4% of those under the age of 18 and 2.3% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Arts and culture

The Tri-Boro area consisting of Woodcliff Lake, Park Ridge and Montvale all participate in an annual Memorial Day Parade.

Parks and recreation

Wood Dale County Park is a Bergen County park covering 118 acres (48 ha) located on Prospect Avenue. It has a playground, a dog park, walking path, tennis courts, athletic fields, picnic areas and a lake for fishing and model boating.

Old Mill Pool is a public pool complex located on Werimus Road. It has a pool, water slide, playground and a picnic area.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 45.94 miles (73.93 km) of roadways, of which 34.27 miles (55.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.47 miles (15.24 km) by Bergen County and 2.20 miles (3.54 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway and County Route 503 pass through Woodcliff Lake.

The Garden State Parkway may be entered, southbound, or exited from, northbound, at exit 171. Due to the fact that not all movements are possible at that exit, exits 168 in Washington Township and 172 in Montvale are also used to access the borough.

Public transportation

Woodcliff Lake is served by NJ Transit at the Woodcliff Lake train station, located at Broadway and Woodcliff Avenues. The station offers service on the Pascack Valley Line, which runs north-south to Hoboken Terminal with connections via the Secaucus Junction transfer station to New Jersey Transit one-stop service to New York Penn Station and to other NJ Transit rail service. Connections are available at the Hoboken Terminal to other New Jersey Transit rail lines, the PATH train at the Hoboken PATH station, New York Waterways ferry service to the World Financial Center and other destinations and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service.

Rockland Coaches offers service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on routes 11T/11AT and 45/46/47. Saddle River Tours / Ameribus provides service to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on route 11C.

Community

Tice Farms was a farm and roadside stand in Woodcliff Lake. Founded in 1808, it was a local landmark which attracted families from miles around, especially in the fall, when it was noted for pumpkins, apple cider, freshly baked donuts, and other fall products. Many people would make the drive to the area from New York City, causing massive traffic jams on autumn weekends. Beginning in the 1970s, the farm was increasingly squeezed by local land development, and Richard Tice, the head of the family, repeatedly sold land to accommodate development. BMW's North American headquarters are located on Chestnut Ridge Road, and is built, and currently being expanded on land once owned by the Tice family. The company is the town's predominant landowner. Tice Farms is now Tice's Corner, an upscale strip mall.

Van Riper's Farm, formerly located approximately across the street from Tice's, was founded in the late 18th century and known for its apple cider and annual turkey shoot. It was closed to make way for an A&P supermarket, which is known as the company's trademark store.

A small reminder of Woodcliff Lake's rural history is Fusco's Market, located on the corner of Werimus and Saddle River Roads. Nearby is the Old Mill Pond, which was established as the town's swimming pool around 1950 when the borough acquired the small, nearly silted-up mill pond near the headwaters of the Musquapsink Brook. Old Mill Pond has been renovated to include a partial sand beach along with a water slide, two diving boards, swimming lanes, and other water activities for kids.

Woodcliff Lake lacks its own public library; however, it offers its residents reimbursement if they pay for a library membership from a neighboring municipality with its own library.

The borough was originally assigned the ZIP code 07680. As part of post office consolidation in the early 1970s, it lost its postmaster (though not its post office) and was designated a branch of the Westwood post office, sharing the ZIP code 07675. Following longtime public protest, it regained its own ZIP code, 07677, in the late 1990s.

In media

Some scenes from the fourth episode of The Jack and Triumph Show entitled, "Siri" were filmed on location at Tice's Corner Marketplace.


Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.