Broxburn, West Lothian facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Warsaw

The Union Canal at Broxburn, looking west
Population

12,892 (2001 census)

est. 14,140 (2006)
OS grid reference NT081722
Council area
Lieutenancy area
Country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Broxburn
Postcode district EH52
Dialling code 01506
Police Lothian and Borders
Fire Lothian and Borders
Ambulance Scottish
EU Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament
  • Livingston
Scottish Parliament
  • Almond Valley
List of places
UK
Scotland
Coordinates: 55°56′02″N 3°28′16″W / 55.934°N 3.471°W / 55.934; -3.471

Broxburn (Scottish Gaelic: Srath Bhroc) is a town in West Lothian, Scotland located 12 miles (19 km) west of Edinburgh on the A8 road, 5 mi (8 km) from Edinburgh Airport, and to the north of Livingston.

As a commuter town serving the M8 corridor into Edinburgh and the industrial areas of Livingston, Broxburn has seen a recent increase in immigration, especially from Poland.

Etymology

The name Broxburn is a corruption of "brock's burn", brock being an old name for a badger and burn being a Scots word for a stream. The village was earlier known as Easter Strathbrock (Uphall was Wester Strathbrock).

History

Greendykes Road, Broxburn
Greendykes Road as of 2005

The village that later became Broxburn probably originated around 1350 when Margery le Cheyne inherited the eastern half of the Barony of Strathbrock (Easter Strathbrock) on the death of her father, Sir Reginald le Cheyne III. The hamlet that grew up around her residence was then called Eastertoun (eastern town) after the land on which it stood. The lands of Strathbrock were earlier owned by Freskin the Fleming, granted to him under a charter from King David I.

Eastertoun was burned to the ground sometime in 1443-4 during a conflict between William, Earl of Douglas, Lieutenant-General of Scotland, and William, Lord Crichton, Chancellor of Scotland. It was destroyed again in 1455 during fighting between the Douglases and King James II. After the conflict, peace was regained and the town was gradually resettled.

The village was renamed Broxburn in 1600 by Sir Richard Cockburn of Clerkington, Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland, almost certainly after Broxburn, East Lothian.

Leisure

The Union Canal passes through Broxburn. It no longer operates as a transport link, but is now used for fishing and some leisure boating. It has a towpath previously used by the horses which drew canal barges and which is now used as a footpath.

Transport

Broxburn has regular links to Edinburgh, Livingston, Linlithgow and Edinburgh Airport. Operators serving the town include, First & E&M Horsburgh. The nearest railway station is at Uphall providing links to Edinburgh, Livingston, Bathgate, Airdrie and Glasgow.

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