Franklin Lakes, New Jersey facts for kids

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Franklin Lakes, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Franklin Lakes
Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve
Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve
Map highlighting Franklin Lakes's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Franklin Lakes's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Franklin Lakes, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Franklin Lakes, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Named for William Franklin
Area
 • Total 9.847 sq mi (25.507 km2)
 • Land 9.379 sq mi (24.292 km2)
 • Water 0.469 sq mi (1.214 km2)  4.76%
Area rank 212th of 566 in state
3rd of 70 in county
Elevation 522 ft (159 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 10,590
 • Estimate (2015) 10,899
 • Rank 231st of 566 in state
35th of 70 in county
 • Density 1,129.1/sq mi (435.9/km2)
 • Density rank 364th of 566 in state
65th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07417
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400524990
GNIS feature ID 0885225
Website www.franklinlakes.org

Franklin Lakes is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 census, the borough's population was 10,590, reflecting an increase of 168 (+1.6%) from the 10,422 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 549 (+5.6%) from the 9,873 counted in the 1990 Census. As of the 2000 Census, Franklin Lakes had the 18th-highest per-capita income of all 566 municipalities in the state. Nationwide, Franklin Lakes ranked 17th among the highest-income places in the United States with a population of at least 10,000. Becton Dickinson, a Fortune 500 company, is headquartered in Franklin Lakes.

Franklin Lakes was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1922, from portions of Franklin Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 11, 1922. The borough was named for William Franklin, the illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin, a steadfast Loyalist who served as the last colonial Governor of New Jersey.

In 2010, Forbes.com listed Franklin Lakes as 146th in its listing of "America's Most Expensive ZIP Codes", with a median home price of $1,306,546.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 9.847 square miles (25.507 km2), including 9.379 square miles (24.292 km2) of land and 0.469 square miles (1.214 km2) of water (4.76%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or wholly within the borough include Bakers Pond, Blauvelt Lakes, Campgaw, Crystal Lakes, Ferdinands Mills, Hopper Lake and Pulis Mills and Shadow Lake.

The borough borders the Bergen County municipalities of Mahwah, Oakland and Wyckoff, and both North Haledon and Wayne in Passaic County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 375
1910 445 18.7%
1920 383 −13.9%
1930 893 133.2%
1940 1,203 34.7%
1950 2,021 68.0%
1960 3,316 64.1%
1970 7,550 127.7%
1980 8,769 16.1%
1990 9,873 12.6%
2000 10,422 5.6%
2010 10,590 1.6%
Est. 2015 10,899 2.9%
Population sources:
1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 10,590 people, 3,527 households, and 3,012 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,129.1 per square mile (435.9/km2). There were 3,692 housing units at an average density of 393.6 per square mile (152.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 88.92% (9,417) White, 1.41% (149) Black or African American, 0.04% (4) Native American, 7.34% (777) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.83% (88) from other races, and 1.46% (155) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.96% (525) of the population.

There were 3,527 households out of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 76.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.6% were non-families. 12.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.29.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 16.7% from 25 to 44, 33.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.9 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $151,224 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,426) and the median family income was $155,156 (+/- $33,998). Males had a median income of $125,586 (+/- $20,759) versus $63,170 (+/- $13,069) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $74,219 (+/- $9,917). About 0.7% of families and 1.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 28 households in 2010, double the 14 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census of 2000, there were 10,422 people, 3,322 households, and 2,959 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,102.5 people per square mile (425.8/km2). There were 3,395 housing units at an average density of 359.2 per square mile (138.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.35% White, 0.92% African American, 0.11% Native American, 6.33% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.74% of the population. 29.8% of residents reported being of Italian ancestry in the 2000 Census, the highest percentage recorded as a percentage of borough population.

There were 3,322 households out of which 43.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 82.0% were married couples living together, 4.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.9% were non-families. 8.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.13 and the average family size was 3.34.

In the borough the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 24.1% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $132,373, and the median income for a family was $142,930. Males had a median income of $97,233 versus $45,588 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $59,763. About 2.6% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Popular culture

Franklin Lakes has been the setting of several reality television shows, including: Bravo network's series The Real Housewives of New Jersey, MTV's My Super Sweet 16, and VH1's My Big Fat Fabulous Wedding. Franklin Lakes was also used for filming the fictional upstate New York town of Dargerville in the Law & Order episode "Knock-Off".

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 92.97 miles (149.62 km) of roadways, of which 71.64 miles (115.29 km) were maintained by the municipality, 16.75 miles (26.96 km) by Bergen County, and 4.58 miles (7.37 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 208 runs for 2.2 miles (3.5 km) across the borough's midsection, from Wyckoff to its western terminus at its intersection with Interstate 287 in Oakland. Interstate 287 enters on the borough's western border with Oakland and heads north towards Mahwah,with the highway's exit 59 in the borough. County Route 502 (Breakneck Road / Franklin Lakes Road) enters from Wayne Township in Passaic County at the borough's southwest corner, runs along the border with Oakland and re-enters Franklin Lakes, heading north towards Wyckoff.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus route 752 serves Franklin Lakes, providing local service.

Campgaw Station
The former Campgaw Station site for the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway as seen in November 2011. There is nothing left of the station platform or depot.

From the late 1800s until 1966, Franklin Lakes had passenger train service at the Crystal Lakes and Campgaw stations on the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway.

Historic sites

Franklin Lakes is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:

  • Ackerman-Boyd House - 1095 Franklin Lake Road (added 1983)
  • Blauvelt House - 205 Woodside Avenue (added 1985)
  • De Gray House - 650 Ewing Avenue (added 1983)
  • Packer House - 600 Ewing Avenue (added 1983)
  • Albert Pulis House - 322 Pulis Avenue (added 1983)
  • Reaction Motors Rocket Test Facility - 936 Dogwood Trail (added 1979)
  • Storms House - 1069 Franklin Lake Road (added 1984)
  • Van Blarcom House - 834 Franklin Lake Road (added 1984)
  • Van Houten House - 778 Vee Drive (added 1983)
  • Van Houten-Ackerman House - 1150 Franklin Lake Road (added 1983)
  • Van Koert-Winters House - 615 Franklin Avenue (added 1984)
  • Van Winkle House - 798 Franklin Lake Road (added 1984)
  • Aaron Winters House - 358 Woodside Avenue (added 1984)
  • Winters-Courter House - 831 Circle Avenue (added 1983)

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