Mahwah, New Jersey facts for kids

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Mahwah, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mahwah
Ramapo College arch
Ramapo College arch
Map highlighting Mahwah's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Mahwah's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mahwah, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mahwah, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated April 9, 1849 (as Hohokus Township)
Reincorporated November 7, 1944 (to Mahwah)
Area
 • Total 67.835 km2 (26.191 sq mi)
 • Land 66.545 km2 (25.693 sq mi)
 • Water 1.290 km2 (0.498 sq mi)  1.90%
Area rank 102nd of 566 in state
1st of 70 in county
Elevation 75 m (246 ft)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 25,890
 • Estimate (2015) 26,590
 • Rank 95th of 566 in state
9th of 70 in county
 • Density 389.1/km2 (1,007.7/sq mi)
 • Density rank 380th of 566 in state
66th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07430, 07495
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400342750
GNIS feature ID 0882312
Website www.mahwahtwp.org

Mahwah is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 25,890. The population increased by 1,828 (+7.6%) from the 24,062 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,157 (+34.4%) from the 17,905 counted in the 1990 Census. The name "Mahwah" is derived from the Lenape word "mawewi" which means "Meeting Place" or "Place Where Paths Meet".

The area that is now Mahwah was originally formed as Hohokus Township on April 9, 1849, from portions of Franklin Township (now Wyckoff). While known as Hohokus Township, territory was taken to form Orvil Township (on January 1, 1886; remainder of township is now Waldwick), Allendale (November 10, 1894), Upper Saddle River (November 22, 1894) and Ramsey (March 10, 1908). On November 7, 1944, the area was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature as the Township of Mahwah, based on the results of a referendum held that day, replacing Hohokus Township.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Mahwah as its 9th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

History

The Lenape and ancestral indigenous peoples were the original inhabitants of Mahwah (the meeting place) and surrounding area. Their descendants have combined with other Native Americans and ethnicities and were recognized in 1980 by the state as the Ramapough Mountain Indians. They number approximately 5,000 people living around the Ramapo Mountains of northern New Jersey and southern New York. The tribe is officially recognized by New Jersey, but does not have federal recognition. Their tribal office is located on Stag Hill Road in Mahwah, and the Chief of the Ramapough Lenape Indian Nation is Dwaine Perry (as of March 2007).

For 25 years, beginning in 1976, Mahwah hosted the A&P Tennis Classic, a tune-up for the U.S. Open tennis tournament held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City's Flushing Meadows–Corona Park.

The 75-room, three-story Darlington, aka the Crocker Mansion, was built in 1901 for George Crocker, son of railroad magnate Charles Crocker. The estate, located at Crocker Mansion Drive, is one of New Jersey's historical landmarks.

Ford Motor Company operated the Mahwah Assembly plant from 1955, producing 6 million cars in the 25 years it operated before the last car rolled off the line on June 20, 1980. At the time of its completion, it was the largest motor vehicle assembly plant in the United States. The Ford plant, along with other businesses such as American Brake Shoe and Foundry Company, helped contribute to the economic development of the town and its reputation for low home property taxes. The Mahwah town sports teams remain named Thunderbirds in honor of the Ford plant.

Due to contractors' dumping of hazardous wastes at the Ringwood Mines landfill site before federal regulation, it has been designated as an EPA Superfund site which needs extensive environmental cleanup. In 2006, some 600 Ramapough Indians filed a mass tort claim against Ford for damages.

Mahwah, and the closure of the Ford plant, is mentioned in the opening line of the 1982 Bruce Springsteen song "Johnny 99".

Scarlet Oak Pond
Scarlet Oak Pond, Ramapo Valley County Reservation
Mahwah New Jersey
Franklin Turnpike in Mahwah with the Manhattan skyline 30 miles (48 km) distant.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 26.191 square miles (67.835 km2), including 25.693 square miles (66.545 km2) of land and 0.498 square miles (1.290 km2) of water (1.90%). It is the largest municipality in Bergen County by area, more than 2½ times larger than the next-largest municipality, Paramus, and covering 10.6% of the total area of the entire county.

Mahwah is near the Ramapo Mountains and the Ramapo River. Interstate 287 passes through Mahwah, but the only point of access is at the New Jersey–New York border, where 287 meets Route 17. U.S. Route 202 runs through Mahwah from Oakland to Suffern, across the state line.

Several state and county parks are located in Mahwah, including Campgaw Mountain Reservation, Darlington County Park and Ramapo Valley County Reservation, all operated by Bergen County. The Ramapo River runs through the western section of Mahwah.

Mahwah is bordered by the towns of Upper Saddle River, Ramsey, Allendale, Wyckoff, Franklin Lakes, and Oakland in Bergen County; Ringwood in Passaic County; and Airmont, Hillburn, Ramapo and Suffern in Rockland County, New York.

Unincorporated communities, localities, and place names located partially or completely within the township include the residential areas of Ackermans Mills, Bear Swamp, Bogerts Ranch Estates, Cragmere, Cragmere Park, Darlington, Fardale, Halifax, Havemeyers Reservoir, Masonicus, Mountainside Farm, Pulis Mills, Ramapo Farm and Wanamakers Mills, along with the mixed residential and commercial area of West Mahwah.

Climate

Mahwah has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa).

Climate data for Mahwah
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 37
(2.8)
40
(4.4)
47
(8.3)
60
(15.6)
70
(21.1)
79
(26.1)
84
(28.9)
82
(27.8)
74
(23.3)
64
(17.8)
53
(11.7)
42
(5.6)
61
(16.11)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(-7.8)
21
(-6.1)
29
(-1.7)
40
(4.4)
49
(9.4)
58
(14.4)
64
(17.8)
62
(16.7)
54
(12.2)
43
(6.1)
35
(1.7)
26
(-3.3)
41.6
(5.32)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.11
(79)
2.99
(75.9)
3.85
(97.8)
4.21
(106.9)
4.09
(103.9)
4.64
(117.9)
4.42
(112.3)
4.41
(112)
4.42
(112.3)
4.49
(114)
4.06
(103.1)
3.92
(99.6)
48.61
(1,234.7)

Parks and recreation

Campgaw Mountain Reservation is a Bergen County accredited park, covering 1,351 acres (547 ha) in Mahwah and portions of Oakland, that has campgrounds and ski slopes for skiing.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 2,274 *
1860 2,352 3.4%
1870 2,632 11.9%
1880 2,920 10.9%
1890 2,373 * −18.7%
1900 2,610 * 10.0%
1910 1,881 * −27.9%
1920 2,081 10.6%
1930 3,536 69.9%
1940 3,908 10.5%
1950 4,880 24.9%
1960 7,376 51.1%
1970 10,800 46.4%
1980 12,127 12.3%
1990 17,905 47.6%
2000 24,062 34.4%
2010 25,890 7.6%
Est. 2015 26,590 2.7%
Population sources: 1850–1920
1850–1870 1850 1870
1880–1890 1890–1910
1910–1930 1900–2010
2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 25,890 people, 9,505 households, and 6,245 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,007.7 per square mile (389.1/km2). There were 9,868 housing units at an average density of 384.1 per square mile (148.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 85.67% (22,180) White, 2.62% (678) Black or African American, 0.56% (146) Native American, 7.81% (2,021) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.40% (363) from other races, and 1.93% (500) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.26% (1,622) of the population.

There were 9,505 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the township, the population was spread out with 19.8% under the age of 18, 16.2% from 18 to 24, 20.3% from 25 to 44, 29.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females there were 87.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 82.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $92,971 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,209) and the median family income was $107,977 (+/- $7,049). Males had a median income of $85,873 (+/- $6,728) versus $54,111 (+/- $3,935) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $53,375 (+/- $3,851). About 2.2% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 49 households in 2010, an increase from the 27 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 24,062 people, 9,340 households, and 6,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 927.9 people per square mile (358.3/km²). There were 9,577 housing units at an average density of 369.3 per square mile (142.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 87.93% White, 2.16% African American, 0.70% Native American, 6.31% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.50% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.27% of the population.

There were 9,340 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the township the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $79,500, and the median income for a family was $94,484. Males had a median income of $62,326 versus $42,527 for females. The per capita income for the township was $44,709. About 1.2% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.8% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 110.29 miles (177.49 km) of roadways, of which 81.91 miles (131.82 km) were maintained by the municipality, 20.59 miles (33.14 km) by Bergen County and 7.79 miles (12.54 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Interstate 287 and Route 17 merge in Mahwah, and U.S. Route 202 also passes through. The northern terminus of County Route 507 is also in Mahwah. Interstate 87, the New York Thruway, is just outside the state in Suffern, New York.

Interstate 287 heads north from Franklin Lakes, continuing for 5.3 miles (8.5 km) to the New York State border. U.S. Route 202 heads north for 5.7 miles (9.2 km), running from Oakland to the New York State border.

Route 17 extends 2.5 miles (4.0 km) from Ramsey until it forms a concurrency where it merges with Interstate 287. County Route 507 runs 2.0 miles (3.2 km) across the northeastern portion of the township, from Ramsey to an intersection with U.S. Route 202 near the state line.

Public transportation

NJ Transit rail service is available from the Mahwah station to Secaucus Junction, Hoboken Terminal, and Newark on the Main Line and Bergen County Line. Passengers may also take advantage of express service on the same line from the Suffern station, just across the New York state line.

Short Line Bus offers service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and intermediate locations.

Images for kids


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