Wyckoff, New Jersey facts for kids

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Wyckoff, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wyckoff
Van Blarcom – Jardine House
Van Blarcom – Jardine House
Nickname(s): "Garden Town in the Garden State"
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated November 2, 1926
Area
 • Total 6.607 sq mi (17.113 km2)
 • Land 6.547 sq mi (16.957 km2)
 • Water 0.060 sq mi (0.156 km2)  0.91%
Area rank 247th of 566 in state
6th of 70 in county
Elevation 331 ft (101 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 16,696
 • Estimate (2015) 17,224
 • Rank 151st of 566 in state
18th of 70 in county
 • Density 2,550.1/sq mi (984.6/km2)
 • Density rank 242nd of 566 in state
47th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07481
Area code(s) 201, 551
FIPS code 3400383050
GNIS feature ID 0882309
Website www.wyckoff-nj.com

Wyckoff is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 16,696, reflecting an increase of 188 (+1.1%) from the 16,508 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,136 (+7.4%) from the 15,372 counted in 1990. As of the 2010 Census, Wyckoff ranked 55th in highest-income places in the United States with a population of at least 10,000 at $103,614 HHI. Statewide, Wyckoff ranked 41st among New Jersey locations by per capita income, with a per capita money income of $49,375 as of 1999, an increase of 49.1% from the $33,124 recorded in 1989.

From the mid-18th century, what is now Wyckoff was a community within Franklin Township, formed on June 1, 1797, when Saddle River Township (now Saddle Brook) was split, which consisted of most of northern Bergen County west of the Saddle River. Starting in the 1840s, several new municipalities were created from portions of Franklin Township (Pompton Township on April 10, 1797, Hohokus Township (now Mahwah) on April 9, 1849, and Ridgewood Township on March 30, 1876; remaining now the Village of Ridgewood), so that today what is now Wyckoff borders eight different communities. Wyckoff was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 2, 1926, replacing Franklin Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. Portions of Wyckoff were ceded to Midland Park based on the results of a referendum held on June 9, 1931.

Though there is no solid historical evidence for any of the various theories, the most commonly given origin for the name Wyckoff, which was the origin accepted by the town committee when the town was established, is that the name is from the Lenape word wickoff, meaning "high ground", or that it is from wickok meaning "water". However, similarly named Wyckoff Heights in New York City is named after the Wyckoff family, who settled in the New York/New Jersey area when both states were part of the Dutch colony of New Netherlands. Other sources ascribe the name to Wicaugh in Malpas, England.

History

The first known human inhabitants of the area were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans who lived north of the Raritan River and spoke a Munsee dialect of Algonquian. Sicomac, said to mean "resting place for the departed" or "happy hunting ground", is an area of Wyckoff that, according to tradition, was the burial place of many Native Americans, including Chief Oratam of the Ackingshacys, and many stores and buildings in the community have been named after the area's name, including Sicomac Elementary School. Most Native Americans had left by the 19th century, although a small group lived near Clinton Avenue until 1939.

What is Wyckoff today was originally part of Saddle River Township, which included all of Bergen County west of the Saddle River. Saddle River Township was split in 1771, with the area containing Wyckoff becoming Franklin Township. By 1755, about 100 families lived in the Franklin Township area, of which no more than 20 were in what is now Wyckoff. Franklin Township (1771) consisted of what is today Ho-Ho-Kus (seceded 1849), Ridgewood (seceded 1876), Midland Park (seceded 1894), Oakland (seceded 1902), Franklin Lakes (seceded 1922), and Wyckoff. The size of Franklin Township decreased as areas seceded and were incorporated into their own municipalities. After Franklin Lakes was established in 1922, Franklin Township consisted of only the area known locally as Wyckoff. On November 2, 1926, residents voted (243 positive votes out of 337) to change the name from Franklin Township to the Township of Wyckoff.

The first recorded permanent settlers were John and William Van Voor Haze (Voorhees), who purchased 550 acres (220 ha) of land in the area in 1720. Other early settlers (mostly Dutch) included the Van Horns, Terhunes, Ackermans, Quackenbushes, Pulises, and Vanderhoffs. In 1940 the population was just under 4,000 consisting of roughly 100 families with 30% of the land devoted to farming. By 1969 the number of farms had dropped to 13 covering 3 acres (1.2 ha), 6% of the township. By 2012, only two farms remain: Abma's Farm and Goffle Road Poultry Farm, which is Bergen County's only remaining live market. Rail service by the New Jersey Midland Railway began in 1870. That service was purchased by the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway, which abruptly ended passenger service in 1966.

The Terhune House is an historic home listed on the National Register of Historic Places, located at 161 Godwin Avenue, that was initially constructed in 1737.

In 1994, the Vander Plaat funeral home prepared the body of Richard Nixon for burial.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 6.607 square miles (17.113 km2), including 6.547 square miles (16.957 km2) of land and 0.060 square miles (0.156 km2) of water (0.91%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Sicomac.

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Wyckoff has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,285
1910 1,509 17.4%
1920 1,288 −14.6%
1930 3,001 * 133.0%
1940 3,847 * 28.2%
1950 5,590 45.3%
1960 11,205 100.4%
1970 16,039 43.1%
1980 15,500 −3.4%
1990 15,372 −0.8%
2000 16,508 7.4%
2010 16,696 1.1%
Est. 2015 17,224 3.2%
Population sources:
1910–1930 1900–2010
2000 2010
* Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 16,696 people, 5,646 households, and 4,641 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,550.1 per square mile (984.6/km2). There were 5,827 housing units at an average density of 890.0 per square mile (343.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 93.53% (15,616) White, 0.56% (94) Black or African American, 0.04% (7) Native American, 4.23% (706) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.47% (79) from other races, and 1.16% (194) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.41% (737) of the population.

There were 5,646 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.2% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.8% were non-families. 16.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the township, the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 17.9% from 25 to 44, 32.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 88.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $145,366 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,501) and the median family income was $163,034 (+/- $10,963). Males had a median income of $111,950 (+/- $12,210) versus $64,148 (+/- $10,102) for females. The per capita income for the township was $64,476 (+/- $5,019). About 0.6% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 24 households in 2010, an increase from the 17 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 16,508 people, 5,541 households, and 4,632 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,521.6 people per square mile (973.1/km2). There were 5,638 housing units at an average density of 861.2 per square mile (332.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.54% White, 0.47% African American, 0.15% Native American, 3.70% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.45% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.28% of the population.

There were 5,541 households out of which 42.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.7% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.4% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

In 2010, the median income for a household in the township was $138,373, and the median income for a family was $154,420. In 2000, males had a median income of $87,850 versus $51,929 for females. The per capita income for the township was $49,375. About 1.1% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 92.04 miles (148.12 km) of roadways, of which 77.02 miles (123.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.60 miles (20.28 km) by Bergen County and 2.42 miles (3.89 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 208 heads northwest through the township, entering from Hawthorne in Passaic County and continuing for 2.5 miles (4.0 km) into Franklin Lakes. County Route 502 (Franklin Avenue) enters from Franklin Lakes and runs east-west through the northern portion of the township for 2.0 miles (3.2 km) into Waldwick.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides service on the 148 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and local bus service on the 722 route and on the 752 route, which operates between Oakland and Hackensack.

Bus service is also provided by Short Line Bus to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, with some buses providing service across 42nd Street to Second Avenue.

Historic rail service

Wyckoff Station
The former station at Wyckoff

The historic Wyckoff railroad station was built by the New Jersey Midland Railway around 1870 and later served passengers on the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad (NYS&W). until service was abruptly curtailed in 1966. Plans to restore service have not materialized. The township is a stop on the annual Toys for Tots train.

Houses of worship

Houses of worship in the township include:

  • Abundant Life Reformed Church
  • Advent Lutheran Church (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America)
  • Bergen Christian Testimony Church
  • Bethany Church (Assemblies of God)
  • Cedar Hill Christian Reformed Church (Christian Reformed Church in North America), founded in 1990
  • Cornerstone Christian Church
  • Faith Community Christian (Christian Reformed Church in North America)
  • Grace United Methodist Church (United Methodist Church) was established in Paterson in 1868 and relocated to Wyckoff in 1964.
  • Powerhouse Christian Church
  • St. Barsawmo Syriac Orthodox Church (Syriac Orthodox Church) was founded in Mahwah in 1998 and relocated to Wyckoff in 2008.
  • St. Elizabeth of Hungary Oman Catholic Church (Roman Catholic Church)
  • St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church (Greek Orthodox Metropolis of New Jersey) was established in 1970 and opened at its current site in 1973.
  • Temple Beth Rishon (an "independent, liberal, egalitarian Jewish congregation")
  • Wyckoff Assembly of God
  • Wyckoff Reformed Church (Reformed Church in America)

Historic sites

Wyckoff is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:

  • Cairns-Whitten-Blauvelt House - 160 Ravine Avenue (added 1983), was constructed c. 1770.
  • Cruse-Hossington House - 301 Newtown Road (added 1983), is a Dutch farmhouse that dates back to 1798.
  • Folly House - 310 Crescent Avenue (added 1983), is a one-and-a-half story home constructed sometime before 1860.
  • Masker House - 470 Wyckoff Avenue (added 1983), was constructed in 1780, with an addition built on to the original structure.
  • Reformed Dutch Church of Wyckoff - 580 Wyckoff Avenue (added 2003)
  • John C. Stagg House - 308 Sicomac Avenue (added 1983), was built in the second half of the 18th century on a foundation dating to 1747.
  • Terhune House - 161 Godwin Avenue (added 1983), dates to the 1700s.
  • Van Blarcom - Jardine House - 380 Wyckoff Avenue (added 1983)
  • Van Blarcom House (Wyckoff, New Jersey) - 131 Godwin Avenue (added 1983).
  • Albert Van Blarcom House - 250 Crescent Avenue (added 1983) dates back to the 1700s, with the main portion of the current house constructed around 1830.
  • Van Gelder House - 347 Godwin Avenue (added 1983)
  • Van Horn-Ackerman House - 101 Wyckoff Avenue (added 1983), consists of an original structure dating back to 1750, with successively larger additions tacked on to the house over the years.
  • Van Houten-Ackerman House (Wyckoff, New Jersey) - 480 Sicomac Avenue (added 1983), known by the name "Wellsweep", the original portion of the home dates back to the 1700s.
  • Van Voorhees-Quackenbush House - 421 Franklin Avenue (added 1983). Dating to an original structure built c. 1740, the house is believed to be the oldest in the township and was contributed to the township in 1973 following the death of Grace Quackenbush Zabriskie.
  • Van Voorhis-Quackenbush House - 625 Wyckoff Avenue (added 1984)

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