Wayne, New Jersey facts for kids

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Wayne, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wayne
Hobart Manor at William Paterson University in Wayne
Hobart Manor at William Paterson University in Wayne
Map of Wayne in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Wayne in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wayne, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wayne, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated April 12, 1847
Named for Anthony Wayne
Area
 • Total 25.174 sq mi (65.202 km2)
 • Land 23.728 sq mi (61.458 km2)
 • Water 1.446 sq mi (3.746 km2)  5.75%
Area rank 107th of 566 in state
3rd of 16 in county
Elevation 400 ft (100 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 54,717
 • Estimate (2015) 55,210
 • Rank 29th of 566 in state
4th of 16 in county
 • Density 2,306.0/sq mi (890.4/km2)
 • Density rank 265th of 566 in state
12th of 16 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC−4)
ZIP codes 07470, 07474
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 3403177840
GNIS feature ID 0882314
Website www.waynetownship.com

Wayne is a township in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States less than 20 miles (32 km) from Midtown Manhattan. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 54,717, reflecting an increase of 648 (+1.2%) from the 54,069 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,044 (+15.0%) from the 47,025 counted in the 1990 Census.

Wayne was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 12, 1847, from portions of Manchester Township. Totowa was formed from portions of Wayne and Manchester Township on March 15, 1898.

The township is home to Willowbrook Mall, Wayne Towne Center, High Mountain Park Preserve and William Paterson University.

History

In 1694 Arent Schuyler, a young surveyor, miner and land speculator, was sent into northwestern New Jersey to investigate rumors that the French were trying to incite the local Lenni-Lenape Native Americans to rebel against the English. Schuyler found no evidence of a rebellion, but discovered a rich fertile valley where the Lenni-Lenape grew a variety of crops. Schuyler reported his findings to the English and then convinced Major Anthony Brockholst, Samuel Bayard, Samuel Berry, Hendrick and David Mandeville, George Ryerson and John Mead to invest in the purchase of the land he referred to as the Pompton Valley. The seven chose Schuyler to be the negotiator with the Lenape for the rights to the area. Bayard purchased 5,000 acres (20 km2) from the East Jersey Company on November 11, 1695, in what was then known as New Barbadoes Township in Bergen County.

In 1710 the area became part of Saddle River Township in Bergen County. By 1837 the residents of Wayne found themselves in Manchester Township in newly formed Passaic County. Finally, on April 12, 1847, the first Wayne Township organization meeting was held at the Henry Casey House on the Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike. The citizens voted to name the town after American Revolutionary War General Anthony Wayne. The first mayor, called the Chairman of the Township Committee until 1962, was William S. Hogencamp.

Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries Wayne remained a farming community. The Morris Canal ran through the southwestern part of Wayne, carrying produce to market and coal from Pennsylvania. The canal was replaced by the railroad at the end of the 19th century. In the early 20th century Wayne grew as a vacation retreat for wealthy New Yorkers. In the summer visitors came from Manhattan and Brooklyn to live in the summer bungalows and enjoy the rivers.

After World War II many summer bungalows were converted to year-round residences to accommodate factory workers, and farmland was converted to residential living. As Wayne grew it adopted its current form of government in 1962. Modern highways, including New Jersey Route 23, U.S. Route 46 and Interstate 80, made Wayne easily accessible, and several national firms have located here.

Historic sites

Dey Mansion 1
Dey Mansion, which served as headquarters for General Washington
VAN SAUN HOUSE, WAYNE, PASSAIC COUNTY NJ
Van Saun House, which served as headquarters for General LaFayette

Dey Mansion, located on Totowa Road, is a historic Georgian style mansion that was constructed between the 1740s and 1750s.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 25.174 square miles (65.202 km2), including 23.728 square miles (61.456 km2) of land and 1.446 square miles (3.746 km2) of water (5.75%).

Wayne shares its borders with 11 neighboring municipalities. Franklin Lakes and Oakland in Bergen County; Fairfield and North Caldwell in Essex County; Lincoln Park and Pequannock in Morris County; and Haledon, Little Falls, North Haledon, Pompton Lakes and Totowa in Passaic County.

Neighborhoods and lake communities

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Barbours Mills, Barbours Pond, Lower Preakness, Mountain View, Packanack Lake, Pines Lake, Point View, Pompton Falls, Preakness and Two Bridges.

Wayne has a number of lakes, with distinct communities and neighborhoods located around them. These include Packanack Lake, Pines Lake, Lions Head Lake, Tom's Lake and Pompton Lake (half of which is in Wayne). The Passaic River also flows through a portion of Wayne and often floods near Willowbrook Mall and riverside neighborhoods.

Climate

Climate data for Wayne, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3.3)
41
(5)
50
(10)
61
(16.1)
72
(22.2)
80
(26.7)
86
(30)
83
(28.3)
76
(24.4)
64
(17.8)
54
(12.2)
42
(5.6)
62.3
(16.81)
Average low °F (°C) 20
(-6.7)
21
(-6.1)
30
(-1.1)
40
(4.4)
50
(10)
59
(15)
64
(17.8)
63
(17.2)
55
(12.8)
42
(5.6)
34
(1.1)
25
(-3.9)
41.9
(5.51)
Precipitation inches (mm) 4.14
(105.2)
2.99
(75.9)
4.28
(108.7)
4.34
(110.2)
4.81
(122.2)
4.45
(113)
4.59
(116.6)
4.34
(110.2)
5.30
(134.6)
3.92
(99.6)
4.43
(112.5)
3.91
(99.3)
51.50
(1,308.1)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,162
1860 1,355 16.6%
1870 1,521 12.3%
1880 1,757 15.5%
1890 2,004 14.1%
1900 1,985 * −0.9%
1910 2,281 14.9%
1920 2,302 0.9%
1930 4,469 94.1%
1940 6,868 53.7%
1950 11,822 72.1%
1960 29,353 148.3%
1970 49,141 67.4%
1980 46,474 −5.4%
1990 47,025 1.2%
2000 54,069 15.0%
2010 54,717 1.2%
Est. 2015 55,210 0.9%
Population sources:
1850–1920 1850–1870
1850 1870 1880–1890
1890–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 54,717 people, 19,127 households, and 14,230 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,306.0 per square mile (890.4/km2). There were 19,768 housing units at an average density of 833.1 per square mile (321.7/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 86.07% (47,097) White, 2.28% (1,247) Black or African American, 0.09% (51) Native American, 8.18% (4,478) Asian, 0.02% (11) Pacific Islander, 1.80% (985) from other races, and 1.55% (848) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.92% (4,335) of the population.

There were 19,127 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 22.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.0% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 29.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 88.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $100,638 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,630) and the median family income was $117,745 (+/- $5,252). Males had a median income of $80,420 (+/- $5,367) versus $54,413 (+/- $2,379) for females. The per capita income for the township was $40,875 (+/- $1,473). About 2.2% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 105 households in 2010, an increase from the 75 counted in 2000.

While Wayne has been and remains predominantly White, it has increased in diversity over the years. From 2000 to 2010, the percentage of every minority group has gone up. Some of the prevalent ethnic minority groups include Indian Americans at 3.0% and Korean Americans at 2.0%, while Puerto Ricans were 2.3% of the population.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 Census, there were 54,069 people, 18,755 households, and 14,366 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,269.5/mi2 (876.4/km2). There were 19,218 housing units at an average density of 806.7/mi2 (806.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.05% White, 1.66% African American, 0.10% Native American, 5.67% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.17% from other races, and 1.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.09% of the population.

There were 18,755 households out of which 34.4% had related children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.4% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.4% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 23.2% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $83,651, and the median income for a family was $95,114. Males had a median income of $61,271 versus $39,835 for females. The per capita income for the township was $35,349. About 1.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture

The indie rock band Fountains of Wayne took their name from a lawn ornament store of the same name that was located in the township on the westbound side of U.S. Route 46, though no members of the band are from the town. The store is now out of business. The same store was featured in an episode of HBO's The Sopranos.

In a Hans and Franz sketch from Saturday Night Live, the pair says they are opening up a gym in Wayne. The fact that Wayne's ZIP code, 07470, is a palindrome, was noted on an episode of the television series Full House in the seventh-season episode "Smash Club: The Next Generation".

Trees from Wayne have been selected to serve as the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree in New York City in 1998, 2001, 2005 and 2006. One of the largest, the 2005 tree, was a Norway Spruce that stood 74 feet (23 m) tall, spreading 42 feet (13 m) wide and weighing in at 9 short tons (8,200 kg) that was removed from the backyard of a Wayne resident.

Transportation

Roads and highways

Wayne is crisscrossed by several major roadways, including Interstate 80, U.S. Route 46, U.S. Route 202 and Route 23.

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 229.48 miles (369.31 km) of roadways, of which 180.59 miles (290.63 km) were maintained by the municipality, 41.05 miles (66.06 km) by Passaic County and 7.84 miles (12.62 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

Wayne is served by NJ Transit at the Mountain View station and Wayne Route 23 station, offering service to Hoboken Terminal, with connections to Midtown Direct trains to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan on the Montclair-Boonton Line. Wayne-Route 23 station opened in January 2008 and offers train service via the Montclair-Boonton Line. There is regular bus service into the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 194 Newfoundland-New York route and the 198 William Paterson University-New York route on weekends, with local service on the 748 Paterson-Willowbrook route (except Sunday).

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 191, 193, 194, 195 and 324; to Newark on the 11 and 28 (Saturday and Sunday only) routes, with local service provided on the 873, 704, 705, 712, 744, 748, 970 and 971 routes. In September 2012, as part of budget cuts, NJ Transit suspended service to Newark on the 75 line.

Wayne is 25.9 miles (41.7 km) from Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark / Elizabeth, and 30 miles (48 km) from LaGuardia Airport in Flushing, Queens.

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