Sedgefield facts for kids

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Sedgefield
Sedgefield Church - geograph.org.uk - 52058.jpg
St Edmund's Church at Sedgefield
Sedgefield shown within County Durham
Population 5,211 (2011)
OS grid reference NZ354286
Civil parish
  • Sedgefield
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town STOCKTON-ON-TEES
Postcode district TS21
Dialling code 01740
Police Durham
Fire County Durham and Darlington
Ambulance North East
EU Parliament North East England
UK Parliament
  • Sedgefield
List of places
UK
England
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Georgian House in Sedgefield
The Manor House in Sedgefield, an example of Queen Anne architecture.

Sedgefield is a town and civil parish in County Durham, England. It has a population of 4,534, increasing to 5,211 at the 2011 census.

A Roman 'ladder settlement' was discovered by Channel Four's Time Team programme in 2003, in fields just to the west of Sedgefield. It consisted of rows of crofts and workshops on either side of a north-south trackway, which could be securely dated by the many finds of Roman coins.

St Edmund's church in Sedgefield is noted for its ornate 17th-century Cosin woodwork, unique to County Durham after the furnishings in Brancepeth were destroyed in a fire.

The 18th century saw the architect James Paine commissioned by John Burdon in 1754 to design and construct a Palladian estate at nearby Hardwick Hall. The building work was never completed as Burdon went bankrupt, but sufficient landscaping was done to form the basis of the now renovated Hardwick Hall Country Park.

The 19th-century South African politician and industrialist Henry Barrington was born in Sedgefield, and actions by his offspring indirectly led to the South African town of Sedgefield, Western Cape being named in honour of his birthplace.

In the 19th century, Sedgefield was a great hunting centre, dubbed 'the Melton of the North'. Hunter Ralph Lambton had his headquarters at Sedgefield: the humorous writer, Robert Smith Surtees, who lived at Hamsterley Hall, was a friend of his. On 23 February 1815, Lord Darlington wrote: 'Mr Ralph Lambton was out with some gentlemen from Sedgefield, and a most immense field.'

Sedgefield was also known in the area because of Winterton Hospital. This was an isolation hospital and an asylum. The site was like a village itself with its own fire station, bank and cricket team. Today, little trace is left of the hospital, apart from the church, which is now surrounded by the Winterton housing estate and the NETPark Science park.

Sedgefield is twinned with Hamminkeln, Germany.

Landmarks

St. Edmund's Church

Sundial Manor House Sedgefield
Sundial, dated 1707, on the Sedgefield Manor House.

The parish of St Edmund was founded by Bishop Cutheard, around AD 900. The Normans replaced the original wooden church with the present stone building with rounded arches and the present church was built between 1246 and 1256, in Norman times, to replace the original wooden church, with later additions. The tower was added in the 15th century by Robert Rodes. The church contains some fine brasses and 17th century woodwork.

Ceddesfeld Hall

Ceddesfeld Hall was originally the rectory to the church, built after the first rectory burnt down; it is now occupied by the Sedgefield Community Association. A Latin inscription above the door states, "By the generosity of Samuel and Shute Barrington, one an Admiral of the Fleet, the other Bishop of Durham, whose achievements are praised by everyone." The hall was rebuilt in 1793, by the Barringtons, for their nephew, the rector. The grounds, now a public area, were laid out in the mid-18th century to a design by Joseph Spence.

Manor House

The Manor House occupies a prominent position at the head of the green. With three storeys it is a fine example of Queen Anne style architecture. Built in 1707, as the sundial on the house proclaims, the house was part of the Hardwick Estate, until 1923. The house has been carefully restored and is currently used as a venue for weddings and events as well as being a business hub.

Parish Hall

The Parish Hall was founded in 1849 as the Institute of Literature and Science, but later rebuilt as a Mechanics Institute. The hall was extensively refurbished in 2008, and continues to host a wide range of social events and entertainment.

Market Cross

The 700th anniversary of the granting of Sedgefield's market charter took place in 2012. The market was held on Cross Hill from 1312 until 1918. The original market cross was removed during the 19th century, but was replaced in 2012 with a modern version, produced by a local designer. A farmers' market is held on the village green on the second Sunday of every month.

Culture and Customs

A Shrove Tuesday Ball Game still takes place in Sedgefield and is an example of Mob Football. A recent statue was erected to commemorate the yearly event; it features a man catching the famous Shrove Tuesday ball.

Another popular annual event is the Mediaeval Fair, which takes place in mid-May, and brings the local community and surrounding areas into the closed central streets of Sedgefield, to participate in fun fair rides, and medieval-themed activities.

Sedgefield is home to a Grade II Listed historic coaching inn, which is presently the Hardwick Arms Hotel.af:Sedgefield nl:Sedgefield

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