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Stockton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Stockton
Map of Stockton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Stockton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stockton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Stockton, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated April 14, 1898
Area
 • Total 0.612 sq mi (1.584 km2)
 • Land 0.535 sq mi (1.386 km2)
 • Water 0.077 sq mi (0.198 km2)  12.52%
Elevation 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 538
 • Estimate (2015) 524
 • Rank 553rd of 566 in state
26th of 26 in county
 • Density 1,005.6/sq mi (388.3/km2)
 • Density rank 381st of 566 in state
10th of 26 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08559
Area code(s) 609 Exchanges: 397, 773
FIPS code 3401970980
GNIS feature ID 0885409
Website www.stocktonboronj.us

Stockton is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. The borough sits on the Delaware River at the western end of Amwell Valley. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 538, reflecting a decline of 22 (-3.9%) from the 560 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 69 (-11.0%) from the 629 counted in the 1990 Census.

Stockton was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 14, 1898, from portions of Delaware Township.

History

Stockton is located along the Delaware River north of Lambertville. The community was first known as Reading Ferry and later as Howell's Ferry. The name was changed to Centre Bridge Station to match the name of the post office and hamlet on the Pennsylvania side of the river. The name became Stockton with the creation of a local post office and railroad station in 1853. The town was named in honor of U.S. Senator Robert Field Stockton, who was instrumental in the creation of the Delaware and Raritan Canal. Stockton soon began to develop as an industrious town with mills and quarries sprouting in the area. In 1852 the Belvidere-Delaware Railroad reached town and accelerated its prosperity. The Borough was incorporated in 1898, having been separated from Delaware Township.

Historic locations and sightseeing

Prallsville Mill
The Prallsville Grist Mill

The tiny town remains today much as it was in the eighteenth century. For all its small size and charm, the town is presided over by an old inn, the Stockton Inn (formerly known as Colligan's Stockton Inn). Established in 1710, it is the inn that was immortalized by Richard Rodgers in the song "There's a Small Hotel (with a wishing well)" sung in the Broadway play On Your Toes. First built as a private residence it is believed to have been converted to an inn around 1832. The Stockton Inn is now a historic restaurant with fireside dining in winter and garden dining in season. The Stockton Inn was acquired in June 2012 by Mitch Millett.

Prallsville Mills

The Delaware River Mill Society was formed to preserve and promote the buildings and site known as the Prallsville Mills. John Prall Jr., became the owner of the site in 1794 and with his settlement the area became known as Prallsville.

The Delaware River Mill Society is a private non-profit organization responsible for the restoration, maintenance, and operation of the historic John Prall Jr. House and the Prallsville Mills Complex, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The entire property became part of the D & R Canal State Park in 1973. In 1976 when the State of New Jersey was unable to fund the restoration of its newly acquired Prallsville Mills, local citizens formed the Delaware River Mill Society, to "restore, preserve, operate, maintain and interpret" the historic site. The Mill Society's mission is to save a segment of our past and make it a part of today's community.

Prallsville Mills has become a place of cultural and environmental events attracting widespread participation. Visitors can tour 10 historic buildings including an 1877 grist mill, a 1790 linseed oil mill, an 1850 saw mill and a 1900 grain silo. Concerts, art exhibitions, antique shows, holiday parties, school fund-raiser auctions, meetings, as well as private parties, are a source of income for restoration and maintenance of the site. The site currently includes artist Ty Hodanish's studio and gallery, known as The Art Colony, which is housed in the Linseed Mill. The Mill is also situated in the center of the Delaware River Scenic Byway.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.612 square miles (1.584 km2), including 0.535 square miles (1.386 km2) of land and 0.077 square miles (0.198 km2) of water (12.52%).

The borough borders Delaware Township in Hunterdon County and Solebury Township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Prallsville is an unincorporated community located along the border with Delaware Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 590
1910 605 2.5%
1920 519 −14.2%
1930 556 7.1%
1940 478 −14.0%
1950 488 2.1%
1960 520 6.6%
1970 619 19.0%
1980 643 3.9%
1990 629 −2.2%
2000 560 −11.0%
2010 538 −3.9%
Est. 2015 524 −2.6%
Population sources: 1900-1920
1900-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 538 people, 237 households, and 142 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,005.6 per square mile (388.3/km2). There were 259 housing units at an average density of 484.1 per square mile (186.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 98.33% (529) White, 0.00% (0) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.93% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.00% (0) from other races, and 0.74% (4) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.56% (3) of the population.

There were 237 households out of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.1% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.5% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 35.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.7 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,750 (with a margin of error of +/- $19,736) and the median family income was $72,321 (+/- $19,152). Males had a median income of $61,250 (+/- $24,259) versus $42,273 (+/- $34,015) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,153 (+/- $7,749). About 0.0% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 560 people, 246 households, and 148 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,026.5 people per square mile (393.1/km2). There were 258 housing units at an average density of 472.9 per square mile (181.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.57% White, 0.89% Asian, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.54% of the population.

There were 246 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 87.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,406, and the median income for a family was $65,000. Males had a median income of $42,083 versus $36,250 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,712. About 1.3% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 4.09 miles (6.58 km) of roadways, of which 2.50 miles (4.02 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.28 miles (0.45 km) by Hunterdon County and 1.31 miles (2.11 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The Centre Bridge-Stockton Bridge, a free bridge over the Delaware River, owned and operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, connects Pennsylvania Route 32 and Pennsylvania Route 263 in Solebury Township, Pennsylvania to Route 29 in Stockton. The original bridge, constructed at the site formerly known as Reading's Ferry, was opened to traffic in the spring of 1814. The covered bridge was destroyed in a flood on January 8, 1841, striking the Lambertville Bridge on its way down the Delaware, as part of a flood that severely damaged every bridge between Easton, Pennsylvania and Trenton.


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