Lambertville, New Jersey facts for kids

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Lambertville, New Jersey
City
City of Lambertville
Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville
Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville
Map of Lambertville in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Lambertville in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lambertville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lambertville, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated March 1, 1849
Named for John Lambert
Area
 • Total 1.298 sq mi (3.359 km2)
 • Land 1.154 sq mi (2.988 km2)
 • Water 0.144 sq mi (0.372 km2)  11.07%
Elevation 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 3,906
 • Estimate (2015) 3,833
 • Rank 416th of 566 in state
13th of 26 in county
 • Density 3,386.1/sq mi (1,307.4/km2)
 • Density rank 193rd of 566 in state
2nd of 26 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08530
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 397, 773
FIPS code 3401938610
GNIS feature ID 0885271
Website www.lambertvillenj.org

Lambertville is a city in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 3,906, reflecting an increase of 38 (+1.0%) from the 3,868 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 59 (-1.5%) from the 3,927 counted in the 1990 Census.

Lambertville is located on the Delaware River in the southwestern portion of Hunterdon County. During the 18th century, the area was named after various operators of ferries across the river to Pennsylvania, ultimately becoming known as Coryell's Ferry, after its owner, Emanuel Coryell. Coryell's Ferry was the western terminus of the New Jersey portion of the York Road (which is now known as U.S. Route 202) connecting New York City and Philadelphia. The community was named Lambertville in 1814, when the post office was established, in honor of John Lambert, a local resident who had served as United States Senator and Acting Governor of New Jersey.

History

The Delaware River and the Delaware and Raritan Canal were instrumental in the early prosperity of Lambertville. In June 1834, the opening of the canal was celebrated with a barge ride from Trenton to Lambertville. The canal's completion was not without hardship. 4,000 Irish immigrants were hired to dig the canal with pick and shovel. During the construction, an epidemic of cholera broke out and dozens of men were buried along the banks of the canal and the Delaware River.

Lambertville was originally incorporated as a town by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1849, from portions of West Amwell Township. The area was reincorporated as a city on March 26, 1872.

Since the 19th century, Lambertville, due to its proximity to the canal and the Belvidere Delaware Railroad, became a factory town where the range of products produced extended from underwear to rubber bands. After the introduction of motorized vehicles made the canal obsolete, the factories began shutting down. Some made it into the 1970s. The railroad continued to serve as a vital freight carrier until the mid 1970s. Later, the Black River and Western Railroad acquired the line into town and continued operating short distance local freight trains as well as scenic tourist passenger excursion trains into the late 1990s.

In the 1970s, young people who had grown up in Lambertville and left returned re-energize their home town. With pioneers including the Jonsdottir art gallery, Hamilton Grill and the Lambertville Station eatery (a hotel soon followed), the city began to attract artists and other creative types. These days, much of town's 18th and 19th century flavor remains, including many restored houses. The town has become a tourist destination, with many shops, galleries, restaurants, and B&Bs. The canal path offers cyclists, joggers and walkers a level place to exercise and enjoy views of the canal and Delaware River in all seasons.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 1.298 square miles (3.359 km2), including 1.154 square miles (2.988 km2) of land and 0.144 square miles (0.372 km2) of water (11.07%).

The city borders Delaware Township and West Amwell Township in Hunterdon County; and both New Hope and Solebury Township in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Lock and Lock Tender's House, Lambertville, NJ
Lock on the feeder canal for the Delaware and Raritan Canal in Lambertville

The Delaware and Raritan Canal flows through the western half of Lambertville, running parallel to the Delaware River. Sections of the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park are also located in the city, which include trails and bridges.

Climate

The climate in Lambertville is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Lambertville has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Climate data for Lambertville, NJ
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 40
(4.4)
43
(6.1)
52
(11.1)
64
(17.8)
74
(23.3)
83
(28.3)
87
(30.6)
86
(30)
79
(26.1)
67
(19.4)
56
(13.3)
45
(7.2)
64.666
(18.1478)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(-7.8)
20
(-6.7)
27
(-2.8)
37
(2.8)
46
(7.8)
56
(13.3)
61
(16.1)
59
(15)
52
(11.1)
40
(4.4)
31
(-0.6)
23
(-5)
39.166
(3.9811)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,417
1860 2,699 90.5%
1870 3,842 42.3%
1880 4,183 8.9%
1890 4,142 −1.0%
1900 4,637 12.0%
1910 4,657 0.4%
1920 4,660 0.1%
1930 4,518 −3.0%
1940 4,447 −1.6%
1950 4,477 0.7%
1960 4,269 −4.6%
1970 4,359 2.1%
1980 4,044 −7.2%
1990 3,927 −2.9%
2000 3,868 −1.5%
2010 3,906 1.0%
Est. 2015 3,833 −1.9%
Population sources: 1850-1920
1850-1870 1850 1870
1880-1890 1890-1910
1910-1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,906 people, 1,958 households, and 896.8 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,386.1 per square mile (1,307.4/km2). There were 2,075 housing units at an average density of 1,798.8 per square mile (694.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 91.30% (3,566) White, 1.95% (76) Black or African American, 0.20% (8) Native American, 1.31% (51) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 4.12% (161) from other races, and 1.13% (44) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.75% (381) of the population.

There were 1,958 households out of which 15.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 54.2% were non-families. 41.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.98 and the average family size was 2.72.

In the city, the population was spread out with 13.7% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 36.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.3 years. For every 100 females there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $71,532 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,040) and the median family income was $100,952 (+/- $14,554). Males had a median income of $57,596 (+/- $17,671) versus $53,869 (+/- $30,408) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $47,684 (+/- $6,399). About 2.3% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 3,868 people, 1,860 households, and 939 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,408.6 people per square mile (1,321.6/km2). There were 1,961 housing units at an average density of 1,728.1 per square mile (670.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.65% White, 1.94% African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.06% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.10% of the population.

There were 1,860 households out of which 18.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.5% were non-families. 38.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. 3.7% have unmarried partners. The average household size was 2.06 and the average family size was 2.82.

In the city the population was spread out with 15.4% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 30.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $52,647, and the median income for a family was $80,669. Males had a median income of $47,313 versus $40,369 for females. The per capita income for the city was $36,267. About 4.5% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Lambertville-NewHope-Bridge
The New Hope-Lambertville Toll Supported Bridge

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 16.67 miles (26.83 km) of roadways, of which 12.77 miles (20.55 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.70 miles (1.13 km) by Hunterdon County and 3.09 miles (4.97 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.11 miles (0.18 km) by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission.

The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission operates the free New Hope-Lambertville Toll Supported Bridge that connects PA 179 in New Hope, Pennsylvania and NJ 179 while the New Hope-Lambertville Toll Bridge is over the line in Delaware Township. Other major roads that pass through include Route 29, Route 165, U.S. Route 202 and CR 518.

While there are no interstates that pass through, there are several nearby, such as Interstate 78 in Franklin Township and Interstate 95 in Hopewell Township.

Community

Annually, in April or May, the city celebrates the return of the shad, a fish popular in the area. The festival includes vendors' booths and others of the like focusing on the area arts community.

Historic sites

Lambertville has several properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The James W. Marshall House was added in 1970. The Delaware and Raritan Canal, which flows through the city, was added as a historic district in 1973. The Lambertville House was added in 1978. Nearly the entire city was listed as the Lambertville Historic District in 1983. The Kalmia Club was added in 2012.

Images for kids


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