Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey facts for kids

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Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Atlantic Highlands
Strauss Mansion
Strauss Mansion
Map of Atlantic Highlands in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in New Jersey.
Map of Atlantic Highlands in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated February 28, 1887
Named for Location overlooking Atlantic Ocean
Area
 • Total 4.562 sq mi (11.815 km2)
 • Land 1.289 sq mi (3.339 km2)
 • Water 3.273 sq mi (8.476 km2)  71.74%
Area rank 283rd of 566 in state
20th of 53 in county
Elevation 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,385
 • Estimate (2015) 4,311
 • Rank 396th of 566 in state
36th of 53 in county
 • Density 3,401.2/sq mi (1,313.2/km2)
 • Density rank 190th of 566 in state
21st of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07716
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 291, 708, 872
FIPS code 3402502110
GNIS feature ID 0885143
Website www.ahnj.com

Atlantic Highlands is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, in the Bayshore Region. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,385, reflecting a decline of 320 (-6.8%) from the 4,705 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 76 (+1.6%) from the 4,629 counted in the 1990 Census.

Atlantic Highlands contains Mount Mitchill, the highest point on the eastern seaboard south of Maine, rising 266 feet (81 m) above sea level. The borough's name comes from its location overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

Atlantic Highlands was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 28, 1887, from portions of Middletown Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. The borough was reincorporated on September 1, 1891.

Atlantic Highlands is part of the Bayshore Regional Strategic Plan, an effort by nine municipalities in northern Monmouth County to reinvigorate the area's economy by emphasizing the traditional downtowns, dense residential neighborhoods, maritime history, and the natural beauty of the Raritan Bayshore coastline.

History

Atlantic Highlands from Sandy Hook (2)
Atlantic Highlands as seen from Sandy Hook

The town overlooks where the Atlantic Ocean and Raritan Bay meet at Sandy Hook, and its hills mark the highest point on the eastern seaboard of the U.S. south of Maine.

For thousands of years, the original inhabitants were the Lenape, who lived in and along the cliffs and creeks of Atlantic Highlands. The Lenape traded with the Europeans and sold a group of English settlers an area that covered the entire peninsula that was named Portland Poynt. The area was laid out with 10 lots in 1667, making them the first European residents of present-day Atlantic Highlands.

Colonists convened the first Assembly of New Jersey in 1667 in what is now Atlantic Highlands. During Revolutionary War years, loyalists to the English crown and patriots of the new America clashed in repeated raids and counterattacks across these lands. And here passed retreating English troops after their 1778 defeat by Washington at the Battle of Monmouth.

During the late 1800s, the many farms were subdivided by resort developers, church groups and builders who created the Victorian core of the borough, attracting thousands of visitors and year-round residents.

In 1879, a surveyor was engaged to lay roads and lots for a permanent community. The Atlantic Highlands Association was formed by prominent members of the Methodist Church. This organization developed the community of Atlantic Highlands.

Individuals and groups came from New York City and the surrounding vicinity to camp along the water in tent colonies. An outdoor amphitheater was created with a large seating capacity and outstanding acoustics. An indoor auditorium was built, which was utilized for entertaining visitors at the camp meetings. In 1887, Atlantic Highlands was incorporated as a borough, containing 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) of land bordering on the Raritan Bay.

Major construction occurred from the 1880s through 1900. It included hotels, cottages, rooming houses, and private homes. A pier was built extending well into the bay to accommodate steamboats from New York City. The next twenty years saw rapid development within the community. A water and sewer system was constructed, cottages were erected, and the road system was completed. During this period of development a fire department was organized.

A number of churches saw their beginning in the 1880s: the Central Baptist, First Presbyterian, Saint Agnes Roman Catholic, First Methodist, and Saint Paul Baptist Church.

Atlantic Highlands became a haven for bootleggers during Prohibition.

Steamer service was the most important transport during the formation of the borough, and continued through the 1940s. In the 1890s, rail service came to Atlantic Highlands. This opened up Highlands and points south to vacationers. The 1920s saw 26 passenger trains daily passing through the Borough. The Central Railroad of New Jersey built a major pier at the end of First Avenue. Several trains at a time could continue to the end of the pier to offload steamboat passengers. From the 1910s through the 1940s, the steamers Sandy Hook and the Monmouth navigated the waters bringing businessmen and vacationers to Atlantic Highlands.

The Manhattan skyline can be seen from the borough's ridges and its shoreline. Pleasure, fishing and commuter boats sail from its harbor. The municipal harbor was built from 1938 through 1940 with municipal, state, and federal funds. It is the largest on the East Coast, home to 715 craft, including high-speed ferry service to New York City, which was introduced in 1986. In 1966, the Central Railroad of New Jersey pier was destroyed by fire. Its rail route is now used by the Henry Hudson Trail.

The bungalows on the East Side of the borough, which in the 1920s were summer bungalows, are now occupied year-round. Portland Pointe, a five-story senior citizens building, provides housing for the elderly.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.562 square miles (11.815 km2), including 1.289 square miles (3.339 km2) of land and 3.273 square miles (8.476 km2) of water (71.74%).

The township borders the Monmouth County communities of Highlands and Middletown Township.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Brevent Park, Hillside, Hilton, Hilton Park, Navesink and Stone Church.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 945
1900 1,383 46.3%
1910 1,645 18.9%
1920 1,629 −1.0%
1930 2,000 22.8%
1940 2,335 16.8%
1950 3,083 32.0%
1960 4,119 33.6%
1970 5,102 23.9%
1980 4,950 −3.0%
1990 4,629 −6.5%
2000 4,705 1.6%
2010 4,385 −6.8%
Est. 2015 4,311 −1.7%
Population sources: 1890-1920
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,385 people, 1,870 households, and 1,186 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,401.2 per square mile (1,313.2/km2). There were 2,002 housing units at an average density of 1,552.9 per square mile (599.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 93.18% (4,086) White, 1.44% (63) Black or African American, 0.25% (11) Native American, 2.17% (95) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.25% (55) from other races, and 1.71% (75) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.13% (225) of the population.

There were 1,870 households out of which 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.6% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 34.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,127 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,511) and the median family income was $100,117 (+/- $16,562). Males had a median income of $73,021 (+/- $18,808) versus $51,207 (+/- $6,155) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,785 (+/- $4,864). About 2.5% of families and 5.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.9% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,705 people, 1,969 households, and 1,258 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,805.4 people per square mile (1,465.0/km2). There were 2,056 housing units at an average density of 1,662.9 per square mile (640.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.37% White, 2.30% African American, 0.06% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 1.02% from other races, and 1.02% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.51% of the population.

There were 1,969 households out of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 21.4% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 26.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $64,955, and the median income for a family was $79,044. Males had a median income of $60,857 versus $36,060 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,798. About 4.4% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.0% of those under age 18 and 12.9% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Atlantic Highlands has a large park system with eight borough-owned parks and two county operated parks. One of larger parks is Lenape Woods. It is nestled among tall trees and steep slopes, Lenape Woods offers approximately 51 acres (210,000 m2) of natural woodlands and freshwater wetlands that are the headwaters to Many Mind Creek. Many groups and local residents volunteer their time to maintain the woods. Monmouth County operates two parks in the town, Henry Hudson Trail and Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook. Henry Hudson Trail runs 9 miles (14 km) from the Aberdeen/Keyport border at the intersection of Lloyd Road and Clark Street to the Atlantic Highlands border at Avenue D, and has been expanded to connect to Highlands. Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook is located about 266 feet (81 m) above sea level, at the highest natural elevation from Maine to the Yucatán, providing views of Sandy Hook, Sandy Hook Bay, Raritan Bay and the New York skyline. This 12-acre (49,000 m2) site is also home to Monmouth County's 9/11 Memorial.

The town's history can be learned at both the Queen Anne-style Strauss Mansion Museum, and the local maritime museum. Lodgings can be found at a number of cottages and inns, such as the Blue Bay Inn. Entertainment venues include the First Avenue Playhouse, which offers dessert-and-dinner theater and puppet shows. Maritime attractions include a yacht club, marina and charter boats for fishing and touring. Other places of interest include a number of gift shops, galleries, and dining establishments.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 24.59 miles (39.57 km) of roadways, of which 21.06 miles (33.89 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.63 miles (4.23 km) by Monmouth County and 0.90 miles (1.45 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

Atlantic Highlands is a stop for the SeaStreak Ferry, which travels from the East 34th Street Ferry Landing and Pier 11/Wall Street (with shuttle bus service to the World Financial Center) in Manhattan daily.

NJ Transit provides local bus transportation on the 834 route.


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