Middletown Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Middletown Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Middletown
Christ Episcopal Church
Christ Episcopal Church
Official seal of Middletown Township, New Jersey
Seal
Motto: The Biggest Small Town in New Jersey
Map of Middletown Township in Monmouth County. Inset (left): Monmouth County highlighted within New Jersey.
Map of Middletown Township in Monmouth County. Inset (left): Monmouth County highlighted within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Middletown Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Middletown Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Formed October 31, 1693
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Area
 • Total 58.735 sq mi (152.122 km2)
 • Land 40.989 sq mi (106.160 km2)
 • Water 17.746 sq mi (45.962 km2)  30.21%
Area rank 23rd of 566 in state
2nd of 53 in county
Elevation 98 ft (30 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 66,522
 • Estimate (2015) 66,024
 • Rank 16th of 566 in state
1st of 53 in county
 • Density 1,622.9/sq mi (626.6/km2)
 • Density rank 321st of 566 in state
40th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07748 - Middletown
07701 - Red Bank
07716 - Atlantic Highlands
07718 - Belford
07732 - Highlands
07733 - Holmdel
07737 - Leonardo
07738 - Lincroft
07752 - Navesink
07758 - Port Monmouth
07760 - Locust
Area code(s) 732 and 908
FIPS code 3402545990
GNIS feature ID 0882604
Website www.middletownnj.org

Middletown Township is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 66,522, making it the state's 16th largest municipality, having seen an increase of 195 residents (0.3%) from its population of 66,327 in the 2000 Census, when it was the state's 17th most populous municipality, which had in turn declined by 1,856 (-2.7%) from the 68,183 counted in the 1990 Census. Middletown is one of the oldest sites of European settlement in New Jersey.

Due to its affluence, low crime, access to cultural activities, public school system, and central commuting location, Middletown was ranked in 2006, 2008, and 2010, and 2014 Top 100 in CNNMoney.com's Best Places to Live. Time magazine listed Middletown on its list of "Best Places to Live 2014".

In 2016, SafeWise named Middletown Township as the fifth-safest city in America to raise a child; the township was the highest ranked of the 12 communities in New Jersey included on the list.

History

Small communities of the Lenape Navesink tribe were common throughout the area when the first known European landing in what would become Middletown Township occurred in 1609. Sea captain and explorer Henry Hudson, in search of the mythical Northwest Passage in the service of the Dutch West India Company, anchored along the shores of Sandy Hook Bay in 1609, describing the area "a very good land to fall in with and a pleasant land to see." While a patroonship was granted by the company in 1651 the land wasn't officially settled. Today's Shoal Harbor Museum and Old Spy House includes portions of a house constructed by Thomas Whitlock, one of the area's first European settlers (and a Reformed Baptist at Middletown) who arrived here as early as 1664, before the English conquest of New Netherland began in 1665 as part of the Second Anglo-Dutch War. Long-standing tradition had Penelope Stout, one of the first settlers, hiding in a tree from hostile Native Americans.

Shortly after the Dutch surrender of the New Netherland to the English in 1664 a large tract of land known as the Navesink Patent or Monmouth Tract was granted to Baptist and Quaker settlers from Long Island, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, which soon thereafter became the townships of Middletown and Shrewsbury.

During the American Revolutionary War, Middletown and much of the rest of Eastern Monmouth County was held by the British. After the Battle of Monmouth, the British retreat from Freehold Township, New Jersey carried them down King's Highway in Middletown to their embarkation points at Sandy Hook in the bay, heading back to New York City.

Middletown Township was originally formed on October 31, 1693, and was incorporated as a township by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form Atlantic Township (February 8, 1847, now Colts Neck Township), Raritan Township (February 25, 1848, now Hazlet Township), Atlantic Highlands (February 28, 1887), Highlands (March 22, 1900) and Keansburg (March 22, 1917).

Upon the completion of a railroad junction in 1875, the town grew more rapidly, eventually changing from a group of small and loosely connected fishing and agricultural villages into a fast-growing suburb at the turn of the 20th century. If Middletown ever had a recognizable town center or town square, it was lost in that rapid growth soon after World War II.

In May 1958, several Nike Ajax missiles exploded at Battery NY-53 in Chapel Hill, killing ten Army and civilian personnel. The accident was one of the worst missile-related disasters of the Cold War.

The Waterfront site of Naval Weapons Station Earle is located in Leonardo on Sandy Hook Bay, and is used to load ammunition onto ships on a finger pier that stretches for 2.9 miles (4.7 km), making it the world's second-longest such pier.

The "Evil Clown of Middletown" is a towering sign along Route 35 painted to resemble a circus clown, that currently advertises a liquor store. The sign is a remnant of an old supermarket that used to be at that location called "Food Circus". The clown and recent successful attempts from residents to save it from demolition have been featured in the pages of Weird NJ magazine, on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and in the Kevin Smith-directed film Clerks II.

The Indian Trails 15K road race is held each year in April to benefit the Monmouth Conservation Foundation and includes a 5K walk/run event for fun. The race, run on a combination on paved and dirt roads, includes many relatively steep hills and has been described as "the most challenging race in the state".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 58.735 square miles (152.122 km2), including 40.989 square miles (106.160 km2) of land and 17.746 square miles (45.962 km2) of water (30.21%).

Belford (2010 Census population of 1,768), Fairview (3,806), Leonardo (2,757), Lincroft (6,135), Navesink (2,020), North Middletown (3,295) and Port Monmouth (3,818) are all census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Middletown Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Browns Dock, Chapel Hill, East Keansburg, Everett, Fort Hancock, Harmony, Headdons Corner, Hendrickson Corners, Tiltons Corner, Town Brook, Waterwitch Park and Wilmont Park.

The Sandy Hook peninsula is also within Middletown Township, though it is not connected to the rest of the township by land. However, one could sail along Raritan Bay from the mainland to Sandy Hook and remain within Middletown Township.

The township borders the Monmouth County communities of Atlantic Highlands, Colts Neck Township, Fair Haven, Hazlet Township, Highlands, Holmdel Township, Keansburg, Red Bank, Rumson, Sea Bright and Tinton Falls.

Poricy Creek (Poricy Park, Oak Hill Road) is locally well known for its deposits of Cretaceous marine fossils, including belemnites.

Climate data for Middletown Township, NJ
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3.3)
41
(5)
48
(8.9)
59
(15)
69
(20.6)
79
(26.1)
83
(28.3)
83
(28.3)
77
(25)
65
(18.3)
54
(12.2)
44
(6.7)
61.7
(16.48)
Average low °F (°C) 27
(-2.8)
27
(-2.8)
34
(1.1)
42
(5.6)
52
(11.1)
62
(16.7)
68
(20)
68
(20)
61
(16.1)
50
(10)
41
(5)
32
(0)
47
(8.33)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.50
(88.9)
2.98
(75.7)
3.90
(99.1)
3.85
(97.8)
4.02
(102.1)
4.40
(111.8)
4.91
(124.7)
4.19
(106.4)
3.84
(97.5)
4.00
(101.6)
3.46
(87.9)
3.70
(94)
46.75
(1,187.5)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 3,225
1810 3,849
1820 4,369 13.5%
1830 5,128 17.4%
1840 6,063 18.2%
1850 3,251 * −46.4%
1860 4,112 26.5%
1870 4,639 12.8%
1880 5,059 9.1%
1890 5,650 * 11.7%
1900 5,479 * −3.0%
1910 6,653 21.4%
1920 5,917 * −11.1%
1930 9,209 55.6%
1940 11,018 19.6%
1950 16,203 47.1%
1960 39,675 144.9%
1970 54,623 37.7%
1980 62,574 14.6%
1990 68,183 9.0%
2000 66,327 −2.7%
2010 66,522 0.3%
Est. 2015 66,024 −0.7%
Population sources:
1800-1920 1840
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 66,522 people, 23,962 households, and 18,235 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,622.9 per square mile (626.6/km2). There were 24,959 housing units at an average density of 608.9 per square mile (235.1/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 93.89% (62,456) White, 1.31% (869) Black or African American, 0.10% (67) Native American, 2.60% (1,730) Asian, 0.01% (8) Pacific Islander, 0.81% (537) from other races, and 1.29% (855) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.37% (3,569) of the population.

There were 23,962 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.5% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the township, the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 31.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $96,190 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,818) and the median family income was $110,944 (+/- $3,794). Males had a median income of $78,739 (+/- $3,585) versus $52,752 (+/- $2,573) for females. The per capita income for the township was $42,792 (+/- $1,706). About 1.7% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 66,327 people, 23,236 households, and 18,100 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,613.0 people per square mile (622.8/km²). There were 23,841 housing units at an average density of 579.8 per square mile (223.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.71% White, 1.21% African American, 0.07% Native American, 2.59% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.41% of the population.

There were 23,236 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.1% were non-families. 18.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the township the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $75,566, and the median income for a family was $86,124. Males had a median income of $60,755 versus $36,229 for females. The per capita income for the township was $34,196. About 1.9% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 105 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 350.16 miles (563.53 km) of roadways, of which 302.18 miles (486.31 km) were maintained by the municipality, 31.44 miles (50.60 km) by Monmouth County and 11.95 miles (19.23 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 4.59 miles (7.39 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway passes through the township, connecting Tinton Falls in the south to Holmdel Township in the north. The township includes Parkway interchange 109 which is signed for County Route 520 to Red Bank / Lincroft and interchange 114 for Holmdel / Middletown. There are three toll gates on the Parkway located in Middletown, two of them are at Exit 109 (northbound entry, southbound exit), and two at Exit 114 (northbound entry, with the southbound toll exit in Holmdel). Routes 35 and 36 pass through Middletown.

CR 516 travels through the northern part of the township and its eastern end is at Route 36 near Leonardo. County Route 520 passes through the southern portion of Middletown. Route 520 leads to Sea Bright to the east and eventually turns into CR 612 to the west, which connects to the New Jersey Turnpike at Exit 8A in Monroe Township.

Public transportation

NJ Transit's provides rail service at the Middletown station which runs between New York City's Pennsylvania Station and Bay Head on the North Jersey Coast Line. NJ Transit is a major commuter rail system, with track-sharing agreements with Amtrak, Metro-North Railroad, Norfolk Southern, CSX Transportation, and Conrail Shared Assets.

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 817, 833 and 834 routes.


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