Red Bank, New Jersey facts for kids

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Red Bank, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Red Bank
Aerial view of Red Bank
Aerial view of Red Bank
Map of Red Bank in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Red Bank in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Red Bank, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Red Bank, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 17, 1870 (as town)
Reincorporated March 10, 1908 (as borough)
Area
 • Total 2.162 sq mi (5.600 km2)
 • Land 1.739 sq mi (4.504 km2)
 • Water 0.423 sq mi (1.096 km2)  19.58%
Area rank 396th of 566 in state
28th of 53 in county
Elevation 43 ft (13 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 12,206
 • Estimate (2015) 12,204
 • Rank 200th of 566 in state
16th of 53 in county
 • Density 7,019.1/sq mi (2,710.1/km2)
 • Density rank 61st of 566 in state
5th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07701-07704, 07709
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402562430
GNIS feature ID 0885366
Website www.redbanknj.org

Red Bank is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, incorporated in 1908 and located on the Navesink River, the area's original transportation route to the ocean and other ports. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough had a population of 12,206, reflecting an increase of 362 (+3.1%) from the 11,844 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,208 (+11.4%) from the 10,636 counted in the 1990 Census.

Red Bank was originally formed as a town on March 17, 1870, from portions of Shrewsbury Township. On February 14, 1879, Red Bank became Shrewsbury City, a portion of Shrewsbury Township, but this only lasted until May 15, 1879, when Red Bank regained its independence. On March 10, 1908, Red Bank was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature and was set off from Shrewsbury Township. The borough was named for the red soil along the Navesink River.

History

Occupied by indigenous peoples for thousands of years, in historic times the area of modern-day Red Bank was the territory of the Algonquian-speaking Lenape Native Americans, also called the Delaware by the English. The Lenape lived in the area between the Navesink River and the Shrewsbury River in an area that they called Navarumsunk. The Native Americans traded freely with European settlers from England and the Dutch Republic in the mid-17th century, who purchased land in the area.

Originally part of "Shrewsbury Towne", Red Bank was named in 1736, when Thomas Morford sold Joseph French "a lot of over three acres on the west side of the highway that goes to the red bank." Red Bank was settled by English colonists beginning in the 17th century and became a center for shipbuilding. Its population grew rapidly after 1809, when regularly scheduled passenger ships were established to serve the route to Manhattan.

By 1844, Red Bank had become a commercial and manufacturing center, focused on textiles, tanning, furs, and other goods for sale in Manhattan. With the dredging of the Navesink River about 1845, Red Bank became a port from which steamboats transported commuters to work in Manhattan. Red Bank grew in size as a result of this, as well as the effects of construction of a railway in the town by the Raritan and Delaware Bay Railroad in 1860.

During the 20th century, Red Bank was a strong cultural, economic, and political center in Monmouth County, until it was hindered by the economic recession that began in 1987. During this time, Red Bank's economy, based largely on retail commerce, was in decline, due to a real estate scandal. Local pundits and urban planners referred to the town as "Dead Bank".

Beginning in approximately 1991, under the New Jersey Development and Redevelopment Law, the borough authorized the creation of the Red Bank RiverCenter to manage redevelopment in what was designated as a special improvement district. RiverCenter retains authority over the management and redevelopment of a defined central business district, which includes Broad Street from the post office to Marine Park and from Maple Avenue to one block east of Broad Street. A number of urban redevelopment projects have taken place, including improved signage, distinctive and pedestrian-friendly sidewalks and lighting, a coherent design plan for Main Street and other major thoroughfares, improved condition of parking lots with landscaping, and similar projects.

The district as originally proposed was larger, to include the commercial areas west of Maple Avenue, including the antique buildings, The Galleria, and Shrewsbury Avenue. But, some property owners in this area were opposed to paying the special assessment. Plans for the larger district advanced but opposition became more rigorous. The proposed district was amended to exclude opponents, and the district that was adopted stops at Maple Avenue.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.162 square miles (5.600 km2), including 1.739 square miles (4.504 km2) of land and 0.423 square miles (1.096 km2) of water (19.58%).

Red Bank is located on the southern bank of the Navesink River, in northern Monmouth County, New Jersey. It is about 24 miles (39 km) due south of the tip of Manhattan and about 25 nautical miles (46 km) to the tip of Manhattan if traveling by water along the Navesink River and through Raritan Bay.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Newmans Corner.

Red Bank is bordered by the Monmouth County municipalities of Middletown Township and the boroughs of Tinton Falls, Fair Haven, Shrewsbury, and Little Silver.

Climate

Red Bank's climate borders humid subtropical (Cfa) and humid continental (Dfa.)

Climate data for Red Bank, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41
(5)
42
(5.6)
49
(9.4)
59
(15)
68
(20)
77
(25)
83
(28.3)
81
(27.2)
75
(23.9)
65
(18.3)
55
(12.8)
46
(7.8)
61.8
(16.53)
Average low °F (°C) 23
(-5)
24
(-4.4)
32
(0)
40
(4.4)
50
(10)
60
(15.6)
66
(18.9)
64
(17.8)
57
(13.9)
45
(7.2)
37
(2.8)
28
(-2.2)
43.8
(6.57)
Precipitation inches (mm) 4.12
(104.6)
3.30
(83.8)
4.16
(105.7)
4.17
(105.9)
4.46
(113.3)
3.25
(82.6)
4.47
(113.5)
5.04
(128)
4.01
(101.9)
3.28
(83.3)
3.97
(100.8)
3.90
(99.1)
48.13
(1,222.5)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 2,086
1880 2,684 28.7%
1890 4,145 54.4%
1900 5,428 31.0%
1910 7,398 36.3%
1920 9,251 25.0%
1930 11,622 25.6%
1940 10,974 −5.6%
1950 12,743 16.1%
1960 12,482 −2.0%
1970 12,847 2.9%
1980 12,031 −6.4%
1990 10,636 −11.6%
2000 11,844 11.4%
2010 12,206 3.1%
Est. 2015 12,204 0.0%
Population sources:1870–1920
1870 1880–1890
1890–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 12,206 people, 4,929 households, and 2,469 families residing in the borough. The population density was 7,019.1 per square mile (2,710.1/km2). There were 5,381 housing units at an average density of 3,094.4 per square mile (1,194.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 63.20% (7,714) White, 12.42% (1,516) Black or African American, 0.97% (118) Native American, 1.85% (226) Asian, 0.11% (13) Pacific Islander, 18.56% (2,265) from other races, and 2.90% (354) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 34.39% (4,198) of the population.

There were 4,929 households out of which 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.8% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.9% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.29.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 20.4% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 34.6% from 25 to 44, 23.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.2 years. For every 100 females there were 103.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 103.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,118 (with a margin of error of +/− $9,139) and the median family income was $79,922 (+/− $12,117). Males had a median income of $51,053 (+/− $6,351) versus $47,368 (+/− $9,445) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,424 (+/− $3,310). About 13.1% of families and 14.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.5% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 11,844 people, 5,201 households, and 2,501 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,639.1 people per square mile (2,569.1/km2). There were 5,450 housing units at an average density of 3,055.0 per square mile (1,182.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 68.19% White, 20.05% African American, 0.35% Native American, 2.19% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 6.73% from other races, and 2.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.11% of the population.

There were 5,201 households out of which 18.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.9% were non-families. 42.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the borough the population was spread out with 17.5% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 35.2% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 18.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $47,282, and the median income for a family was $63,333. Males had a median income of $45,922 versus $34,231 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,265. About 6.3% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.5% of those under age 18 and 10.6% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture

Basie theatre
The Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank

Red Bank is a noted social and commercial destination, filled with boutiques, designer clothing and home stores, parks, and restaurants. Special events are scheduled throughout the summer, such as the KaBoomFest fireworks on July 3, which attracted as many as 150,000 spectators at its 51st annual event in 2010.

Since the 1950s, Red Bank has held the Annual Red Bank Sidewalk Sale. The 58th Annual Sidewalk Sale was held from July 27, 2012 to July 29, 2012, and was seen in "The Sidewalk Stash", the November 11, 2012 episode of the reality TV series Comic Book Men.

The town is considered a center of artistic activity, and is home to the Monmouth County Arts Council, as well as several art and photography galleries.

The Count Basie Theatre has hosted performers such as Kevin Smith, David Sedaris, Tracy Morgan, Bill Cosby, Bob Newhart, Foreigner, Andy Williams, Brian Setzer, B.B. King, and others. The Count Basie Theatre is also home to Phoenix Productions, a non-profit community theatre founded in 1988 puts on large scale musicals four times a year. The Two River Theater Company opened a large performance space on April 30, 2005, called the Two River Theater. Bruce Springsteen filmed his 2005 VH-1 Storytellers special at the Two River Theatre. The Marion Huber Theater, also operated by the Two River Theater Company, is a small black box theater, with seating for about 100.

IceBoatsRedBank
Whenever the conditions are right, ice boats appear on the Navesink.

Boating, sculling, sailing, and fishing are popular outdoor activities in and near Red Bank; in the winter, ice boats sail on the Navesink when it freezes over, as it did in 2009. The Monmouth Boat Club, Marine Park, and the slips of the Molly Pitcher Inn provide access to the Navesink and, from there, Sandy Hook and the Gateway National Recreation Area, the Jersey Shore and the Atlantic Ocean.

Broad Street is one of the borough's central streets and is known for its lavish Christmas decorations, which appear on the street during the holiday season. The street is closed to traffic for a free concert sponsored by Holiday Express, after which the lights are all lit again. Up to 7,000 people attend the shows annually.

Red Bank hosts the Red Bank Jazz & Blues Festival in partnership with the Jersey Shore Jazz & Blues Society. "First Night", a New Year's Eve arts and entertainment festival, is a Red Bank event designed to provide an alternative to alcohol-related events.

Each year from 1960 through 2011, a fireworks display was launched from the Navesink River close to Red Bank on July 3, the eve of Independence Day. "KaBoomFest" was held in Marine Park, where local bands and vendors formed a major gathering.

In media

7.9.12SecretStashByLuigiNovi2
Jay and Silent Bob's Secret Stash on Broad Street. Tinted panels have been placed over the windows and door to block sunlight during filming of the reality TV series Comic Book Men.

Several tunes composed and/or made famous by Count Basie name-check the town in their title, including "Red Bank Boogie" and "The Kid from Red Bank." Basie was born and grew up in Red Bank, starting his musician's career there. A bronze bust of Basie was commissioned to mark what would have been his 100th birthday in 2004, and was placed in the plaza outside the Red Bank train station.

In his 1942 essay "Memoirs of a Drudge", humorist James Thurber recalls being sent to Red Bank by his newspaper's city editor on a tip that "Violets (are) growing in the snow over in Red Bank." Putting in a telephone call to that town's Chief of Police in advance, Thurber is told by a desk sergeant, "Ain't no violence over here."

Some of the films by Kevin Smith, who lived in Red Bank while working as an up-and-coming director, are partially set there, including Chasing Amy, Dogma, and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back. Smith's comic book store, Jay and Silent Bob's Secret Stash, which is the setting of the AMC reality television series, Comic Book Men, is also located in Red Bank, at 35 Broad Street. Smith and View Askew Productions also host the annual Vulgarthon film marathon in various theaters around Red Bank.

Images for kids


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