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Little Silver, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Little Silver
Parker Homestead
Parker Homestead
Map of Little Silver in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Little Silver in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Little Silver, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Little Silver, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 28, 1923
Area
 • Total 3.315 sq mi (8.586 km2)
 • Land 2.708 sq mi (7.013 km2)
 • Water 0.607 sq mi (1.573 km2)  18.32%
Area rank 321st of 566 in state
22nd of 53 in county
Elevation 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 5,950
 • Estimate (2015) 5,913
 • Rank 347th of 566 in state
28th of 53 in county
 • Density 2,197.3/sq mi (848.4/km2)
 • Density rank 274th of 566 in state
32nd of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07739
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402540770
GNIS feature ID 0885282
Website www.littlesilver.org
LS geese
Canada Geese cross street in Little Silver, New Jersey

Little Silver is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,950, a drop of 220 (-3.6%) from the 6,170 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 449 (+7.8%) from the 5,721 counted in the 1990 Census.

Little Silver was established with a King's land grant in 1663 and settled in 1667. Little Silver was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 19, 1923, from portions of Shrewsbury Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 28, 1923.

History

Prior to the settlement of Europeans, the area that is now Little Silver was inhabited by the Navesink Native Americans.

There are several tales of how Little Silver received its name. In one, brothers Joseph and Peter Parker, who settled in this area in 1667 and owned land bounded by Parker's Creek on the south and Little Silver Creek on the north, named their holdings "Little Silver" after their father's (George Parker) estate in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. The original Parker Homestead, dating to 1725 and one of the state's oldest, was acquired by the borough and is undergoing renovation.

Other explanations for the derivation of the name are the payment to Native Americans for purchase of the land and the placid appearance of the water.

The borough's earliest European residents were primarily farmers, fishermen and merchants.

Early families and businesses include:

  • Parkers - Joseph and Peter Parker originally settled the area, and their original homestead at 235 Rumson Road has been declared a state historic site.
  • Sickles - Harold and Elsie Sickles acquired land and opened a wholesale truck farm in 1908. The land was acquired from Harold's mother who was related to the Parkers. Transitioning from seasonal to year-round in 1998, Sickles Market is today a successful specialty garden and food market.
  • Little Silver Bottle Shop - Established in 1944, the iconic wine & spirits shop is the oldest continually running retail business in the borough.

John T. Lovett owned a nursery that once covered almost half the borough, supplying large catalog houses such as Sears Roebuck, Macy's and Newberry's. In 1878 he circulated a petition to the community recommending that the name be revised and on July 30, 1879, the Post Office name was changed from "Parkersville" to "Little Silver".

The borough has had a varied history as a resort, agricultural area and fishing town. Today, the municipality is primarily residential with a range of housing types, from ranches and capes.

Little Silver separated from Shrewsbury Township in 1923. Since then, farms and nurseries have been replaced by housing. Over the years, New York City and North Jersey commuters have made Little Silver their home, traveling by rail or auto to their jobs. The Little Silver Train Station on Sycamore Avenue was designed by the noted American architect Henry Hobson Richardson and built in 1890. It reopened after renovations in 2003.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.315 square miles (8.586 km2), including 2.708 square miles (7.013 km2) of land and 0.607 square miles (1.573 km2) of water (18.32%).

The original farms and nurseries have almost all been replaced by housing today. Little Silver's location on the Shrewsbury River makes it a popular destination for boaters and water sports enthusiasts, with a public boat ramp at the Dominick F. Santelle Park off Riverview Avenue. Approximately 8% of the homes are directly on the Shrewsbury River and another third of homes are on streams that connect to it.

The borough borders the Monmouth County municipalities of Fair Haven, Monmouth Beach, Oceanport, Red Bank, Rumson and Shrewsbury Borough.

Little Silver Point is an unincorporated community located within Little Silver.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,109
1940 1,461 31.7%
1950 2,595 77.6%
1960 5,202 100.5%
1970 6,010 15.5%
1980 5,548 −7.7%
1990 5,721 3.1%
2000 6,170 7.8%
2010 5,950 −3.6%
Est. 2015 5,913 −0.6%
Population sources:1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 5,950 people, 2,146 households, and 1,689 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,197.3 per square mile (848.4/km2). There were 2,278 housing units at an average density of 841.3 per square mile (324.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 96.42% (5,737) White, 0.29% (17) Black or African American, 0.10% (6) Native American, 1.75% (104) Asian, 0.13% (8) Pacific Islander, 0.17% (10) from other races, and 1.14% (68) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.01% (179) of the population.

There were 2,146 households out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.4% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.3% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 19.0% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 85.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $144,299 (with a margin of error of +/- $23,666) and the median family income was $167,659 (+/- $28,090). Males had a median income of $126,556 (+/- $27,434) versus $71,667 (+/- $13,832) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $66,069 (+/- $8,285). About 1.7% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 6,170 people, 2,232 households, and 1,810 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,226.2 people per square mile (860.0/km2). There were 2,288 housing units at an average density of 825.5 per square mile (318.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.15% White, 0.31% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.51% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.31% of the population.

There were 2,232 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.5% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.9% were non-families. 16.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $94,094, and the median income for a family was $104,033. Males had a median income of $90,941 versus $45,938 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,798. About 0.4% of families and 0.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 0.8% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 32.41 miles (52.16 km) of roadways, of which 25.68 miles (41.33 km) were maintained by the municipality and 6.73 miles (10.83 km) by Monmouth County.

Both Route 35 and CR 520 clip the very western corner of the borough. The closest limited access road is the Garden State Parkway via CR 520 in Middletown Township.

Public transportation

LSticketbooth
Little Silver train station agent's window
NJT little silver
NJT train at Little Silver train station
Little silver truck
Borough of Little Silver vehicle

The Little Silver train station is served by trains on NJ Transit's North Jersey Coast Line. The station is one of the few on the electrified portion of the line without raised platforms. The station is located between two grade crossings. When trains stop at the station, they block the roadway at one crossing or the other for entire duration of the stop, causing traffic backups.

The train station, constructed in 1875 by the New York and Long Branch Railroad, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

From the Raritan Bayshore SeaStreak catamarans travel to Pier 11 at Wall Street and East 34th Street Ferry Landing in Manhattan. NY Waterway ferries travel to Paulus Hook Ferry Terminal in Jersey City, Battery Park City Ferry Terminal and West Midtown Ferry Terminal in Manhattan.


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