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Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Tinton Falls
Crawford House in Tinton Falls Historic District
Crawford House in Tinton Falls Historic District
Map of Tinton Falls in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tinton Falls in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tinton Falls, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated August 15, 1950 as New Shrewsbury
Renamed 1975 as Tinton Falls
Government
 • Type Faulkner Act (mayor–council)
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 15.60 sq mi (40.41 km2)
 • Land 15.48 sq mi (40.08 km2)
 • Water 0.13 sq mi (0.33 km2)  0.83%
Area rank 173rd of 565 in state
12th of 53 in county
Elevation
98 ft (30 m)
Population
 • Total 17,892
 • Estimate 
(2019)
17,451
 • Rank 144th of 566 in state
12th of 53 in county
 • Density 1,155.3/sq mi (446.1/km2)
 • Density rank 361st of 566 in state
44th of 53 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
07701 – Red Bank
07712 – Ocean Township
07724 – Eatontown
07753 – Neptune Township
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402573020
GNIS feature ID 0885419

Tinton Falls is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 17,892, an increase of 2,839 (+18.9%) from the 15,053 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,692 (+21.8%) from the 12,361 counted in the 1990 Census.

The borough was formed as New Shrewsbury by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on August 15, 1950, based on the results of a referendum held on July 18, 1950, after breaking away from Shrewsbury Township. It was renamed "Tinton Falls" in 1975, to avoid postal errors. The name came from Lewis Morris's plantation, Tinton Manor, which employed free white workers and slaves. The borough is home to the highest waterfall on New Jersey's coastal plain.

History

The area that is now known as Tinton Falls was originally settled in the late 1600s, probably beginning with the initial land purchases from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans in 1664. Water power and iron ore were likely the incentives that encouraged settlement: shortly after [the land was purchased], a man by the name of James Grover had an ironworks built along the river. Grover was likely the founder of the community, which, in the 1600s, was named "New Shrewsbury". At this time, the waterfall was known to be about 30 feet (9.1 m) high; erosion and the destruction of the dam near the ironworks have led to its diminishment.

The ironworks

Grover's ironworks was the central fixture of the community, and it was one of the oldest built in the country, predated only by buildings in Jamestown and Massachusetts. In 1675, a half-interest in the ironworks company was purchased by Colonel Lewis Morris, [who obtained a title granting him 3,540 acres (14.3 km2) along the Shrewsbury River]. Morris also obtained land owned by Bartholomew Applegate, who had built a corn mill on the other side of the river. Morris, who procured the land for iron mining, named his holdings "Tintern Manor," after his family lands in Monmouthshire, England. Tintern Abbey, located in Monmouthshire, Wales, is often accepted as the namesake of Tinton Falls.

Tintern Abbey and Courtyard
Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire, Wales, is often accepted as the namesake of Tinton Falls.

In 1691, Colonel Morris died, leaving the ironworks and Tinton Manor (a corruption of "Tintern Manor") to his nephew of the same name. By 1714, the ironworks had become less profitable, but mention of a Tinton Falls ironworks can be found as late as 1844. Morris brought in dozens of African slaves to mine the ore resulting in the nickname the "Iron Plantation", with the highest number of slaves being in Tinton Falls at that time in the colony of New Jersey, though in mid-18th century it had the largest number of emancipated slaves in the 13 colonies, as residents followed the preaching of abolitionist John Woolman.

Separation from Shrewsbury Township

In 1693, Tinton Manor and the surrounding lands were defined as part of Shrewsbury Township. At this time, Shrewsbury included all of the land in eastern Monmouth County, but saw the departure of a large number of new municipalities over the years, including the borough of Shrewsbury in 1926. In July 1950, Tinton Falls and Wayside left Shrewsbury Twp., renaming themselves the Borough of New Shrewsbury. To avoid postal confusion and mix-ups with the surrounding borough and township of Shrewsbury, the residents of New Shrewsbury voted to rename the community as "The Borough of Tinton Falls" in 1975.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Tinton Falls borough had a total area of 15.623 square miles (40.463 km2), including 15.487 square miles (40.110 km2) of land and 0.136 square miles (0.352 km2) of water (0.87%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Wayside. Green Grove, Hockhockson, Macedonia, Pine Brook, Reevytown, West Shrewsbury and Wileys Corner are other unincorporated communities located partly or completely within the borough.

The township borders the Monmouth County municipalities of Colts Neck Township, Eatontown, Middletown Township, Neptune Township, Ocean Township, Red Bank, Shrewsbury, Shrewsbury Township and Wall Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 3,783
1960 7,313 93.3%
1970 8,395 14.8%
1980 7,740 −7.8%
1990 12,361 59.7%
2000 15,053 21.8%
2010 17,892 18.9%
2019 (est.) 17,451 −2.5%
Population sources: 1950–1990
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 17,892 people, 8,355 households, and 4,462 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,155.3 per square mile (446.1/km2). There were 8,766 housing units at an average density of 566.0 per square mile (218.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 82.39% (14,741) White, 9.34% (1,672) Black or African American, 0.13% (23) Native American, 4.67% (835) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.31% (235) from other races, and 2.14% (382) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.25% (1,118) of the population.

There were 8,355 households out of which 21.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.6% were non-families. 42.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 27.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 19.0% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 25.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.9 years. For every 100 females there were 78.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 74.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,894 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,470) and the median family income was $99,231 (+/- $8,633). Males had a median income of $72,478 (+/- $8,954) versus $53,956 (+/- $7,492) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,149 (+/- $2,077). About 3.2% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.2% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 15,053 people, 5,883 households, and 3,976 families residing in the borough. The population density was 965.7 people per square mile (372.8/km2). There were 6,211 housing units at an average density of 398.4 per square mile (153.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.80% White, 13.04% African American, 0.24% Native American, 4.96% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.70% of the population.

There were 5,883 households, out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 36.4% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $68,697, and the median income for a family was $79,773. Males had a median income of $58,098 versus $37,857 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,520. About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Overlook by the Falls, located near the town's waterfalls (the namesake for the town), is a wildlife area where trails have been added to allow visitors to view the falls and the local fauna.

Borough parks include Hockhockson Park, with three baseball fields and basketball courts, Liberty II Park, with two football fields, a softball field and basketball courts, Riverdale West Park, with two soccer fields and a basketball court and the Sycamore Recreation Complex, which offers six lighted multi-purpose fields, among the borough's other parks and recreation facilities.

Shark River Park, the first included in the Monmouth County Park System when it was established in 1961, covers 961 acres (389 ha) along the Shark River in portions of Tinton Falls, Neptune Township and Wall Township.

The Twin Brook Golf Center is a public 9-hole golf course, 18-hole miniature golf course, and driving range.

Transportation

Roads and highways

2021-05-27 16 06 16 View south along the southbound lanes of New Jersey State Route 444 (Garden State Parkway) from the overpass for Monmouth County Route 537 (Tinton Avenue) in Tinton Falls, Monmouth County, New Jersey
The southbound Garden State Parkway in Tinton Falls

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 96.93 miles (155.99 km) of roadways, of which 65.99 miles (106.20 km) were maintained by the municipality, 17.77 miles (28.60 km) by Monmouth County, 4.22 miles (6.79 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 8.95 miles (14.40 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Major highways passing through Tinton Falls include the Garden State Parkway, Route 18, Route 33, and Route 66. Tinton Falls houses exits 100 (including the Monmouth Service Area), 102, 105, and 109 on the parkway, including a high-speed toll gate, and the southern start/end of the express and local carriageways, although the borough is listed only on signs for exit 105.

Major county roads that pass through Tinton Falls are CR 520 (Newman Springs Road, which crosses the northern portion of the borough), CR 537 (Tinton Avenue, which also crosses the northern portion of the borough from Colts Neck Township in the west to Eatontown in the east) and County Route 547 (Shafto Road), which enters from Wall Township at the borough's southwest corner and proceeds northeast towards Eatontown.

Other limited access road that are accessible outside the borough include Interstate 195 in neighboring Wall Township.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers train service on the North Jersey Coast Line at the nearby Red Bank station. NJ Transit local bus service is available on the 836 and 838 routes.

Points of interest

One night at Tinton Falls
The waterfall of Tinton Falls
  • Old Mill at Tinton Falls – constructed in 1676, the site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
  • Frozen Ropes, a baseball training center.
  • Tinton Falls Library, one of the member libraries of the Monmouth County Library System. Established in 1961 as the New Shrewsbury Public Library Association, the name was changed to its current title in 1975.

Economy

Jersey Shore Premium Outlets is an outdoor shopping mall that opened in November 2008 with 120 outlet stores and a food court, offering a gross leasable area of 435,000 square feet (40,400 m2).

The Tinton Falls Solar Farm is a 28.5-megawatt solar photovoltaic power plant covering 170 acres (69 ha), that contains 85,000 ground-mounted solar panels that has been the state's largest and was New Jersey's largest and one of the largest solar farms in the northeast United States at the time of its construction.

Commvault Systems, founded in 1996, is a publicly traded data management and information management software company. Commvault's global headquarters are in Tinton Falls.

Education

Public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the three schools in the Tinton Falls School District, together with students from the neighboring community of Shrewsbury Township and the dependent children of military families based at Naval Weapons Station Earle. All three of the district's schools are located in Tinton Falls. Shrewsbury Township is represented with one seat out of nine on the district's board of education. As of the 2020–21 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,331 students and 153.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.7:1. Schools in the district (with 2020–21 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Mahala F. Atchison Elementary School with 438 students in grades K-3, Swimming River Elementary School with 440 students in grades 4-5 and Tinton Falls Middle School with 446 students in grades 6-8.

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Monmouth Regional High School, located in Tinton Falls. The school also serves students from Eatontown, Tinton Falls and Naval Weapons Station Earle. As of the 2020–21 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 953 students and 90.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.6:1. Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the populations of the constituent municipalities, with five seats assigned to Tinton Falls.

Students may also apply to attend one of the magnet schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School District – Marine Academy of Science and Technology, Academy of Allied Health & Science, High Technology High School, Biotechnology High School, and Communications High School.

Ranney School is a coeducational, nonsectarian K-12 private school founded in 1960; its campus occupies 60 acres (24 ha) off of Hope Road. Trinity Hall is an all-girls independent high school in the Catholic tradition, founded in 2013.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Tinton Falls, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Tinton Falls include:

  • Bryan Antoine (born 2000) college basketball player for the Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team.
  • Kelly J. Breen (born 1969), trainer of thoroughbred racehorses.
  • Ernabel Demillo (born 1965), television journalist who is the host and producer of CUNY TV's Asian American Life.
  • Tom Gallagher (1940-2018), diplomat, who in 1976, became the first officer of the United States Foreign Service to come out as gay.
  • Alan Garcia (born 1985), thoroughbred horse racing jockey.
  • Robert Giroux (1914–2008), book editor and publisher who was a partner in what became known as Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Sean Goldman (born 2000), boy in the center of an international custody dispute between his American father and Brazilian mother.
  • Milton Goode (born 1960), retired high jumper who represented the United States at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.
  • Michelle Leonardo (born 1990), dancer, model, winner of several beauty pageants.
  • Joe Maneely (1926–1958), artist who co-created Marvel Comics characters the Black Knight, the Ringo Kid, the Yellow Claw, and Jimmy Woo.
  • Amir Meshal (born c.1982), American citizen detained by Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia during the Somalia War (2006–2009).
  • John Muller (born 1966), television journalist with ABC News, where his anchor duties include World News Now and ABC News Now.
  • Brianne Reed (born 1994), soccer player who plays as a defender for FC Nordsjælland in Denmark's Elitedivisionen league.
  • Ranya Senhaji (born 2002), footballer who plays as a forward for the South Carolina Gamecocks and the Morocco women's national team.
  • Ivy Troutman (1884–1979), Broadway actress.
  • Quentin Wheeler (born 1955, class of 1974), track and field athlete who came in fourth in the 400 metres hurdles at the 1976 Summer Olympics.
  • Bill Winters (born 1954), offensive lineman in the National Football League, Canadian Football League, American Football Association and United States Football League.
  • Dorothy Young (1907–2011), entertainer, stage assistant to magician Harry Houdini.
  • Daryn Zhunussov (born 1991), ice dancer from Kazakhstan.
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