kids encyclopedia robot

Colts Neck Township, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Quick facts for kids
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Colts Neck
Colts Neck High School
Colts Neck High School
Map of Colts Neck Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Colts Neck Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey is located in Monmouth County, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Location in Monmouth County, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey is located in New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Location in New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey is located in the United States
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey
Location in the United States
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated February 18, 1847 as Atlantic Township
Renamed November 6, 1962 as Colts Neck Township
Government
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
Area
 • Total 31.79 sq mi (82.34 km2)
 • Land 30.72 sq mi (79.55 km2)
 • Water 1.08 sq mi (2.79 km2)  3.38%
Area rank 78th of 565 in state
6th of 53 in county
Elevation
59 ft (18 m)
Population
 • Total 10,142
 • Estimate 
(2019)
9,822
 • Rank 243rd of 566 in state
19th of 53 in county
 • Density 330.0/sq mi (127.4/km2)
 • Density rank 471st of 566 in state
51st of 53 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07722
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402514560
GNIS feature ID 0882602

Colts Neck Township is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. It is located in the New York Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 10,142, reflecting a decline of 2,189 (-17.8%) from the 12,331 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,772 (+44.1%) from the 8,559 counted in the 1990 Census.

The municipality of Colts Neck Township was initially established by an act of the New Jersey Legislature as Atlantic Township on February 18, 1847, carved from portions of Freehold Township, Middletown Township, and Shrewsbury Township. The name was changed to "Colts Neck Township" as of November 6, 1962, based on the results of a referendum held that day.

The township has been ranked as one of the state's highest-income communities. Based on data from the American Community Survey for 2013–2017, Colts Neck residents had a median household income of $167,480, ranked fifth in the state among municipalities with more than 10,000 residents, more than double the statewide median of $76,475.

Community

Colts Neck is a community in Central New Jersey, located within the New York metropolitan area. Many people choose to move to Colts Neck due to its open space and proximity to the Jersey Shore, while still being within commuting distance of New York City and, to a lesser extent, Philadelphia. The township's strict zoning ordinances have long kept out urban development and chain stores, allowing for locally owned businesses, while still being close to malls, movie theaters, and other amenities in neighboring communities. A 2007 study of New Jersey's wealthiest communities listed Colts Neck as New Jersey's 16th wealthiest municipality and categorized the township's population as "top rung", meaning:

These communities are the wealthiest consumer market, representing less than 1 percent of all U.S. households. These highly educated residents are in their peak earning years, aged 45 to 64, in married-couple households, with or without children. The median age is 42.3 years. With the purchasing power to indulge any choice, Top Rung residents travel in style, both domestically and overseas. This is the top market for owning or leasing a luxury car; residents favor new imported vehicles, especially convertibles. Exercise and community activities are part of their busy lifestyle. Avid readers, these residents find time to read two or more daily newspapers and countless books.

The township has a Farmland Preservation Committee which to date has preserved nearly 1,000 acres (400 ha) of land, providing one way in which Colts Neck has been able to prevent large-scale development. The township has strict zoning regulations, and because there is no public water or sewage service, most homes must be built on lots covering a minimum of 2, 5 and 10 acres (4.0 ha).

Originally a farming community, Colts Neck has long been known for its large number of equestrian farms. From the 1950s into the 1970s many of Colts Neck's heavily wooded areas were developed with large colonial and ranch-style houses on acre-sized lots. In the 1980s and continuing into the 2000s much of the town's farm land has been replaced with large houses, mansions and sprawling estates, although a large number of equestrian farms remain. During this time period increasing home prices in northern New Jersey and New York City resulted in large numbers of people moving to central New Jersey, causing real estate prices in Colts Neck and surrounding towns to rise considerably over the course of the two decades. Colts Neck real estate prices remain high despite the economic downturn: as of November 2012, the average listing price of a house was $1,433,112 and the number of home sales is down 41.4% from the previous year.

Many of Colts Neck's residents are professional business people who commute into New York City's financial district, as could be seen in the unusual proportion of the small community who were lost in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks upon the World Trade Center. A memorial garden dedicated to the five members of the community who were lost was created at the municipal center by sculptor Jim Gary, a member of the community who was raised in Colts Neck. The central feature of the memorial garden is his sculpture of metal and stained glass.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.792 square miles (82.341 km2), including 30.731 square miles (79.593 km2) of land and 1.061 square miles (2.748 km2) of water (3.34%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bucks Mill, Hominy Hill, Lippincott, Montrose, Phalanx, Scobeyville, Swimming River and Vanderburg.

The township borders the Monmouth County communities of Freehold Township, Holmdel Township, Howell Township, Marlboro Township, Middletown Township, Tinton Falls and Wall Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,498
1860 1,692 13.0%
1870 1,713 1.2%
1880 1,743 1.8%
1890 1,505 −13.7%
1900 1,410 −6.3%
1910 1,205 −14.5%
1920 1,074 −10.9%
1930 1,241 15.5%
1940 1,177 −5.2%
1950 1,814 54.1%
1960 2,177 20.0%
1970 5,819 167.3%
1980 7,888 35.6%
1990 8,559 8.5%
2000 12,331 44.1%
2010 10,142 −17.8%
Est. 2019 9,822 −3.2%
Population sources:
1850-1920 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

A 2007 study of New Jersey's highest-income communities shows Colts Neck had a median household income of $166,495, up from $109,190 in 2000, and the average household income was $232,520, which ranked it 16th in the state. The per capita income for the township as of 2007 was $70,781 up from $46,795 in 2000. The average household net worth, not including equity in homes, is $1,088,351 and the average disposable income for a household is $140,507.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 10,142 people, 3,277 households, and 2,848 families residing in the township. The population density was 330.0 per square mile (127.4/km2). There were 3,735 housing units at an average density of 121.5 per square mile (46.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 92.17% (9,348) White, 1.67% (169) Black or African American, 0.01% (1) Native American, 4.58% (464) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.36% (37) from other races, and 1.21% (123) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.54% (359) of the population.

There were 3,277 households out of which 43.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.4% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.1% were non-families. 11.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.08 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the township, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 17.0% from 25 to 44, 33.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $154,491 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,020) and the median family income was $166,909 (+/- $14,315). Males had a median income of $117,917 (+/- $16,897) versus $67,188 (+/- $14,434) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,919 (+/- $6,519). About 2.0% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.8% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 12,331 people, 3,513 households, and 3,193 families residing in the township. The population density was 392.4 people per square mile (151.5/km2). There were 3,614 housing units at an average density of 115.0 per square mile (44.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 85.51% White, 7.89% African American, 0.23% Native American, 3.63% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.45% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.22% of the population.

There were 3,513 households, out of which 50.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.1% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 9.1% were non-families. 7.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 2.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the township the population was spread out, with 29.2% under the age of 18, 12.1% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 109.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $109,190, and the median income for a family was $117,980. Males had a median income of $55,609 versus $38,457 for females. The per capita income for the township was $46,795. 2.8% of the population and 2.2% of families were living below the poverty line, including 2.2% of under eighteens and 2.8% of those over 64.

Transportation

Roads and highways

2021-07-30 11 18 14 View south along New Jersey State Route 18 from the overpass for Obre Road in Colts Neck Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey
Route 18 southbound in Colts Neck Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 132.59 miles (213.38 km) of roadways, of which 103.86 miles (167.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.52 miles (24.98 km) by Monmouth County and 13.21 miles (21.26 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Two major state roads pass through the township: Route 18 (the freeway portion) and Route 34. Major county roads that traverse the township are CR 520 (along the border) and CR 537.

The Garden State Parkway is accessible in neighboring Holmdel Township, Middletown Township, Tinton Falls and Wall Township. Interstate 195 is also outside the township, in neighboring Wall and Howell Township.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides local bus service between Freehold Township and Sea Bright on the 838 route.

Ferry service is available through the SeaStreak service in Highlands, a trip that involves about a 25-30 minute drive from Colts Neck Township (depending on the section of town) to reach the departing terminal. SeaStreak offers ferry service to New York City with trips to Pier 11 (on the East River at Wall Street) and East 35th Street in Manhattan. The ferry service also offers seasonal travel, such as to the public beaches on Sandy Hook, baseball games at Yankee Stadium and Citi Field, trips to Broadway matinees, Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, college football games at West Point, fall foliage in the Hudson Valley, and to the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, among other excursions.

Economy

Colts Neck, NJ (NJ 34 approaching CR 537)
Center of Colts Neck's business district at the intersection of Route 34 and CR 537

Laird & Company produces Laird's Applejack at its facility in the Scobeyville section of the township. Since the end of distilling in Colts Neck in 1972, the company has had its apples picked and distilled in Virginia, and then brought north to be aged, blended and bottled at its facility in the township. The only remaining producer of Applejack in the United States, the company received the first license granted by the United States Department of the Treasury, which was granted in 1780.

Four JG's Orchards & Vineyards is a winery based in the township, named for the shared initials of the owners and their two children.

Education

Students in public school attend the Colts Neck School District for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 966 students and 110.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.8:1. Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Conover Road Primary School with 328 students in grades PreK-2, Conover Road Elementary School with 278 students in grades 3-5 and Cedar Drive Middle School (350; 6–8).

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Colts Neck High School, along with students from portions of Howell Township. The Freehold Regional High School District (FRHSD) also serves students from Englishtown, Farmingdale, Freehold Borough, Freehold Township, Howell Township, Manalapan Township and Marlboro Township. As of the 2017–18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 2,118 students and 139.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.2:1. Students may apply to attend one of the district's six specialized learning centers, including the Humanities Learning Center hosted at Howell High School. The FRHSD board of education has nine members, who are elected to three-year terms from each of the constituent districts. Each member is allocated a fraction of a vote that totals to nine points, with Colts Neck Township allocated one member, who has 1.0 votes.

About 20% of the township's K-8 population attend private schools. These include Ranney School, Rumson Country Day School and St. Leo the Great School. At the high school level about half of all students attend private schools, including Christian Brothers Academy, Lawrenceville School, Peddie School, Ranney School, Red Bank Catholic High School, Mater Dei High School and St. John Vianney High School.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Colts Neck Township, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Colts Neck Township include:

  • Vincent Accettola (born 1994), producer and arts administrator, currently serving as Managing Director of the National Youth Orchestra of China.
  • Robert E. Brennan (born 1944), entrepreneur who built the penny stock brokerage firm, First Jersey Securities; Brennan was later convicted of fraud and was arrested at his home in Colts Neck in 2001.
  • David Bryan (born 1962), of the band Bon Jovi.
  • Lillian G. Burry, member of the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders who had served as mayor of Colts Neck.
  • Caroline Casagrande (born 1976), Assemblywoman for the 12th District of the New Jersey General Assembly.
  • Wayne Chrebet (born 1973), now-retired wide receiver who spent his career with the New York Jets.
  • Steven E. Fass, President & CEO of White Mountains Insurance Group.
  • Jim Gary (1939–2006), sculptor, popularly known for his large, colorful creations of dinosaurs made from discarded automobile parts.
  • Al Golden (born 1969), professional and college football coach
  • Charles Haight (1838–1891), United States congressman who represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district from 1867 to 1871.
  • Walt Hameline (born 1951), Director of Athletics and former head football coach at Wagner College.
  • Pete Harnisch (born 1966), former Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher who played for the New York Mets.
  • Ashley Higginson (born 1989), middle-distance runner who has made the U.S. team for the 2013 World Championships in Athletics in the 3000 meter steeplechase.
  • Joe Klecko (born 1953), former player of the New York Jets.
  • Stephanie Klemons (born 1982), Broadway performer and choreographer, who was the associate choreographer and original dance captain of the Broadway musical Hamilton.
  • Queen Latifah (born 1970), rapper and actress.
  • Jacquie Lee (born 1997), singer came in second place on The Voice season 5.
  • Pat Light (born 1991), pitcher for the Minnesota Twins.
  • Heather Locklear (born 1961), actress.
  • Eric Munoz (1947–2009), politician who served in the New Jersey General Assembly from May 2001, where he represented the 21st legislative district, until his death.
  • Jim Nantz (born 1959), lead NFL and NCAA men's basketball commentator for CBS.
  • Nicole Napolitano, reality TV star and former cast member on The Real Housewives of New Jersey alongside her twin sister, Teresa.
  • Patti Scialfa (born 1953), singer-songwriter, musician and member of the E Street Band.
  • Bruce Springsteen (born 1949), rock and roll legend, who recorded a large part of his album Nebraska in a house he rented in Colts Neck, owns the township's largest equestrian farm and built his home on the farm.
  • Jon Stewart (born 1962), comedian, writer, producer, director, actor, media critic and former television host.
  • Hans K. Ziegler (1911–1999), pioneer in the field of communication satellites and the use of photovoltaic solar cells as a power source for satellites.
kids search engine
Colts Neck Township, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.