Cordell Hull facts for kids

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Cordell Hull
Hull-Cordell-LOC.jpg
47th United States Secretary of State
In office
March 4, 1933 – November 30, 1944
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Deputy William Phillips (1933-1936)
Sumner Welles (1936-1943)
Edward Stettinius, Jr. (1943-1944)
Preceded by Henry L. Stimson
Succeeded by Edward Stettinius, Jr.
United States Senator
from Tennessee
In office
March 4, 1931 – March 4, 1933
Preceded by William Emerson Brock
Succeeded by Nathan L. Bachman
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Tennessee's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1923 – March 4, 1931
Preceded by Wynne F. Clouse
Succeeded by John R. Mitchell
In office
March 4, 1907 – March 4, 1921
Preceded by Mounce Gore Butler
Succeeded by Wynne F. Clouse
17th Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
In office
1921–1924
Preceded by George White
Succeeded by Clem L. Shaver
Personal details
Born (1871-10-02)October 2, 1871
Olympus, Tennessee, U.S.
Died July 23, 1955(1955-07-23) (aged 83)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Rose Frances Witz
Alma mater Cumberland School of Law
Profession Politician, Lawyer
Signature
Military service
Branch/service Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
Rank Captain
Battles/wars Spanish-American War

Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871 – July 23, 1955) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. He is known as the longest-serving Secretary of State, holding the position for 11 years (1933–1944) in the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt during most of World War II. Hull received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 for his role in establishing the United Nations, and was referred to by President Roosevelt as the "Father of the United Nations".

Life and government

He served in the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1893 to 1897. During the Spanish–American War, he served in Cuba as a captain in the Fourth Regiment of the Tennessee Volunteer Infantry.

Hull served 11 terms in the United States House of Representatives (1907–1921 and 1923–1931) and authored the federal income tax laws of 1913 and 1916 and the inheritance tax of 1916.

In 1934, Hull was appointed Secretary of State by Franklin D. Roosevelt; he served 11 years until he retired from public office. Hull became the underlying force and architect in the creation of the United Nations, drafting, along with his staff, the United Nations Charter in mid-1943. He resigned as Secretary of State in November 1944 because of failing health.

In 1945, Cordell Hull was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for "co-initiating the United Nations".

Hull resigned in November 1944 because of failing health as the longest-serving Secretary of State, having served 11 years, nine months in that post. Roosevelt described Hull upon his departure as "the one person in all the world who has done his most to make this great plan for peace (the United Nations) an effective fact". The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored Hull with the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 in recognition of his efforts for peace and understanding in the Western Hemisphere, his trade agreements, and his work to establish the United Nations.

Cordell Hull tomb - Joseph of Arimathea Chapel - National Cathedral - DC
Gravesite of Cordell Hull at the St. Joseph of Arimathea Chapel, in Washington National Cathedral Church

He died on July 23, 1955, at age 83, at his home in Washington, D.C., after a lifelong struggle with familial remitting-relapsing sarcoidosis (often confused with tuberculosis). He is buried in the vault of the Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimathea in the Washington National Cathedral.

There is now a Cordell Hull Museum located near his birthplace in Byrdstown, Tennessee, which houses his papers and other memorabilia.

Legacy

Cumberland School of Law Moot Court Room Cordell Hull
Cumberland School of Law's Cordell Hull Moot Court Room—portrait at head of room

Hull's memory is preserved by Cordell Hull Dam on the Cumberland River near Carthage, Tennessee. The dam impounds Cordell Hull Lake, covering approximately 12,000 acres (49 km2).

His law school, Cumberland School of Law, continues to honor him with a Cordell Hull Speaker's Forum and the pictured Moot Court Room.

CordellHullStamp1964
Cordell Hull commemorative stamp issued in 1964

Cordell Hull Birthplace State Park, near Byrdstown, Tennessee, was established in 1997 to preserve Hull's birthplace and various personal effects Hull had donated to the citizens of Pickett County, including his Nobel Peace Prize.

A segment of Kentucky highway routes 90, 63, and 163, from Interstate 65 at Mammoth Cave National Park south to the Tennessee State Line, is named "Cordell Hull Highway".

The Shoreline School District in Shoreline, Washington, formerly had a Cordell Hull Middle School; it was renamed in the mid-1990s to Meridian Park Elementary, after a renovation.

The Cordell Hull State Office Building. Located at the base of Capital Hill, Nashville, Tennessee, is a secure 10 story building that contains the offices of Attorney General, Health and Child Services.

The Eisenhower Executive Office Building (formerly the Old Executive Office Building) in Washington, DC, next to the White House, contains the ornately decorated "Cordell Hull Room" on the second floor, which is used for meetings. The room was Cordell Hull's office when he served as U.S. Secretary of State.

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