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Far Hills, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Far Hills
Alexander and James Linn Homestead
Alexander and James Linn Homestead
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Flag of Somerset County, New Jersey.gif Somerset
Incorporated May 12, 1921
Government
 • Type Borough
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 4.90 sq mi (12.69 km2)
 • Land 4.85 sq mi (12.55 km2)
 • Water 0.06 sq mi (0.14 km2)  1.12%
Area rank 280th of 565 in state
12th of 21 in county
Elevation
213 ft (65 m)
Population
 • Total 919
 • Estimate 
(2019)
903
 • Rank 536th of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county
 • Density 191.6/sq mi (74.0/km2)
 • Density rank 511th of 566 in state
21st of 21 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07931
Area code(s) 908 exchange: 443
FIPS code 3403522890
GNIS feature ID 0885217

Far Hills is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 919, reflecting an increase of 60 (+7.0%) from the 859 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 202 (+30.7%) from the 657 counted in the 1990 Census.

Far Hills was incorporated as a borough based on an Act of the New Jersey Legislature passed on April 7, 1921, from portions of Bernards Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on May 12, 1921. Far Hills is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold. It is located within the Raritan Valley region.

History

Far Hills encompasses nearly 5 square miles (13 km2) in Somerset County, encircled by the equally upscale communities of Bedminster Township, Peapack-Gladstone, Bernards Township, and Bernardsville. It shares a community pool, athletic programs, civic organizations, and a school system with Bernardsville. It shares a public library, a fire department and a first aid squad with neighboring Bedminster Township.

The borough maintains its character through 10-acre (40,000 m2) minimum zoning laws whereby large private properties and homes surround a small village which was the creation of a wealthy New York businessman in the late 1800s. The beginning of rail service to nearby Bernardsville in 1870, opened the area to city people seeking a respite from the heat and hurry of urban life.

Evander H. Schley, a land developer and real estate broker from New York, purchased thousands of acres in Bedminster and Bernards townships in the 1880s. One day in 1887, Schley's brother, Grant, and his wife, Elizabeth, arrived by horse-drawn carriage to see Evander's farms. Elizabeth is said to have remarked on the beautiful vista of the "far hills," thus giving the name to the place before a village was built.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Far Hills borough had a total area of 4.881 square miles (12.641 km2), including 4.797 square miles (12.424 km2) of land and 0.084 square miles (0.217 km2) of water (1.72%).

The borough borders the Somerset County municipalities of Bedminster Township to the west, Bernards Township to the east, Bernardsville to the northeast and Peapack-Gladstone to the northwest.

Climate

The climate in the area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Far Hills has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 560
1940 574 2.5%
1950 600 4.5%
1960 702 17.0%
1970 780 11.1%
1980 677 −13.2%
1990 657 −3.0%
2000 859 30.7%
2010 919 7.0%
2019 (est.) 903 −1.7%
Population sources:1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 919 people, 376 households, and 259 families residing in the borough. The population density was 191.6 per square mile (74.0/km2). There were 418 housing units at an average density of 87.1 per square mile (33.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 95.32% (876) White, 0.65% (6) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.85% (17) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.54% (5) from other races, and 1.63% (15) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.58% (88) of the population.

There were 376 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 19.7% from 25 to 44, 35.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $125,833 (with a margin of error of +/- $29,841) and the median family income was $202,083 (+/- $85,006). Males had a median income of $177,083 (+/- $60,611) versus $76,250 (+/- $38,263) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $93,495 (+/- $19,515). About 3.6% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 859 people, 368 households, and 253 families. The population density was 176.8 people per square mile (68.2/km2). There were 386 housing units at an average density of 79.4 per square mile (30.7/km2). The racial makeup was 96.04% White, 0.81% African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.10% Asian, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.61% of the population.

There were 368 households, out of which 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.76.

The population was spread out, with 18.4% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household was $112,817, and the median income for a family was $149,095. Males had a median income of $90,000 versus $46,607 for females. The per capita income was $81,535. About 0.8% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 1.2% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Transportation

2021-06-30 10 10 56 View south along the southbound lanes of Interstate 287 from the overpass for Mine Brook Road in Far Hills, Somerset County, New Jersey
I-287 southbound in Far Hills

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 15.28 miles (24.59 km) of roadways, of which 9.70 miles (15.61 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.59 miles (4.17 km) by Somerset County and 2.99 miles (4.81 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The most prominent highway serving Far Hills is Interstate 287. U.S. Route 202 also passes through the borough.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides service at the Far Hills train station on the Gladstone Branch of the Morristown Line; the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is located at U.S. Route 202, near the intersection of Far Hills Road, one half mile east of U.S. Route 206, offering service via Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station or to Hoboken Terminal.

Lakeland Bus Lines provides Route 78 rush-hour service from Bedminster to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.

Sports

The United States Golf Association has a Far Hills mailing address but is actually located in Bernards Township. The United States Golf Association Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History is located on the premises.

From 2000 through 2005 the Breeders' Cup Grand National Steeplechase returned to the Far Hills Races after a hiatus of six years. Known for the highest prize money of a steeplechase in America, the purse for the Breeders' Cup winner has been as large as $250,000 and has attracted up to 100,000 spectators. Several races are scheduled by Far Hills Race Meeting Association in late October of each year. Considered one of the premier social events of the year in the tri-state area, it is attended by as many as 75,000 people annually.

Education

Students in public school attend the schools of the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a regional school district covering pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills, and Peapack-Gladstone, along with students from Bedminster Township who attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,975 students and 158.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.5:1. Schools in the district (with 2017–18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Marion T. Bedwell Elementary School with 568 students in grades PreK–4, Bernardsville Middle School with 523 students in grades 5–8 and Bernards High School with 852 students in grades 9–12. The district's board of education has nine elected members (and one appointed member) who set policy and oversee the fiscal and educational operation of the district through its administration. The nine elected seats on the board are allocated to the constituent municipalities based on population, with one seat allocated to Far Hills.

Far Hills Country Day School is a private, nonsectarian coeducational day school located in Far Hills, serving 444 students in nursery through eighth grade on a 55-acre (220,000 m2) campus.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Far Hills, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Far Hills include:

  • Nicholas F. Brady (born 1930), former United States Secretary of the Treasury who represented New Jersey in the United States Senate.
  • James Chesson (born 1980), race car driver.
  • P. J. Chesson (born 1978), IndyCar driver who raced in the 2006 Indianapolis 500.
  • Charles W. Engelhard Jr. (1917–1971), businessman who controlled an international mining and metals conglomerate and was a major owner of thoroughbred race horses.
  • Malcolm Forbes (1919–1990), former editor-in-chief of Forbes magazine.
  • Steve Forbes (born 1947), editor-in-chief of Forbes.
  • Joseph S. Frelinghuysen Jr. (1912-2005), author of Passages to Freedom, about his escape from a prison camp in Italy during World War II.
  • J. Geils (1946-2017), blues-rock lead guitarist, singer, and founder of The J. Geils Band.
  • Jack H. Jacobs (born 1945), retired colonel in the United States Army and a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions during the Vietnam War.
  • Joe J. Plumeri, (born 1944), Chairman & CEO of Willis Group and owner of the Trenton Thunder.
  • Michael F. Price (born 1951), value investor and fund manager.
  • Aileen Quinn (born 1971), actress, singer and dancer best known for her role as Annie Bennett Warbucks in the 1982 film Annie.
  • Andrew Schlafly (born 1961), founder of Conservapedia, son of Phyllis Schlafly.
  • James Wallwork (born 1930), politician who served in both houses of the New Jersey Legislature.
  • Christine Todd Whitman (born 1946), former Governor of New Jersey.
  • Kate Whitman Annis (born c. 1978), general manager of the Metropolitan Riveters of the National Women's Hockey League.
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