Far Hills, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Far Hills, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Far Hills
Official seal of Far Hills, New Jersey
Seal
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Far Hills in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Far Hills, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated May 12, 1921
Area
 • Total 4.881 sq mi (12.641 km2)
 • Land 4.797 sq mi (12.424 km2)
 • Water 0.084 sq mi (0.217 km2)  1.72%
Area rank 280th of 566 in state
12th of 21 in county
Elevation 213 ft (65 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 919
 • Estimate (2015) 930
 • Rank 536th of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county
 • Density 191.6/sq mi (74.0/km2)
 • Density rank 511th of 566 in state
21st of 21 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07931
Area code(s) 908 exchange: 443
FIPS code 3403522890
GNIS feature ID 0885217
Website borofarhills.tripod.com

Far Hills is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 919, reflecting an increase of 60 (+7.0%) from the 859 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 202 (+30.7%) from the 657 counted in the 1990 Census.

Far Hills was incorporated as a borough based on an Act of the New Jersey Legislature passed on April 7, 1921, from portions of Bernards Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on May 12, 1921. Far Hills is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.

History

Far Hills encompasses nearly 5 square miles (13 km2) in Somerset County, encircled by the equally upscale communities of Bedminster Township, Peapack-Gladstone, Bernards Township, and Bernardsville. It shares a community pool, athletic programs, civic organizations, and a school system with Bernardsville. It shares a public library, a fire department and a first aid squad with neighboring Bedminster Township.

The borough maintains its character through 10-acre (40,000 m2) minimum zoning laws whereby large private properties and homes surround a small village which was the creation of a wealthy New York businessman in the late 1800s. The beginning of rail service to nearby Bernardsville in 1870, opened the area to city people seeking a respite from the heat and hurry of urban life.

Evander H. Schley, a land developer and real estate broker from New York, purchased thousands of acres in Bedminster and Bernards townships in the 1880s. One day in 1887, Schley's brother, Grant, and his wife, Elizabeth, arrived by horse-drawn carriage to see Evander's farms. Elizabeth is said to have remarked on the beautiful vista of the "far hills," thus giving the name to the place before a village was built.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Far Hills borough had a total area of 4.881 square miles (12.641 km2), including 4.797 square miles (12.424 km2) of land and 0.084 square miles (0.217 km2) of water (1.72%).

The borough borders the Somerset County municipalities of Bedminster Township to the west, Bernards Township to the east, Bernardsville to the northeast and Peapack-Gladstone to the northwest.

Climate

The climate in the area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Far Hills has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 560
1940 574 2.5%
1950 600 4.5%
1960 702 17.0%
1970 780 11.1%
1980 677 −13.2%
1990 657 −3.0%
2000 859 30.7%
2010 919 7.0%
Est. 2015 930 1.2%
Population sources:1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 919 people, 376 households, and 259.1 families residing in the borough. The population density was 191.6 per square mile (74.0/km2). There were 418 housing units at an average density of 87.1 per square mile (33.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 95.32% (876) White, 0.65% (6) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.85% (17) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.54% (5) from other races, and 1.63% (15) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.58% (88) of the population.

There were 376 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 19.7% from 25 to 44, 35.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.5 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 96.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $125,833 (with a margin of error of +/- $29,841) and the median family income was $202,083 (+/- $85,006). Males had a median income of $177,083 (+/- $60,611) versus $76,250 (+/- $38,263) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $93,495 (+/- $19,515). About 3.6% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 859 people, 368 households, and 253 families. The population density was 176.8 people per square mile (68.2/km2). There were 386 housing units at an average density of 79.4 per square mile (30.7/km2). The racial makeup was 96.04% White, 0.81% African American, 0.12% Native American, 2.10% Asian, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.61% of the population.

There were 368 households out of which 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.5% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 25.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.76.

The population was spread out with 18.4% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 88.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household was $112,817, and the median income for a family was $149,095. Males had a median income of $90,000 versus $46,607 for females. The per capita income was $81,535. About 0.8% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 1.2% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

  • The Leonard J. Buck Garden, 33 acres (130,000 m2), is a public botanical garden operated by the Somerset County Park Commission, and located at 11 Layton Road. It is open daily; a small fee is requested.
  • Moggy Hollow Natural Area is a National Natural Landmark adjacent to the Buck Garden.
  • Natirar is an estate spanning 491 acres (1.99 km2) in Far Hills, Peapack-Gladstone and Bedminster that was sold in 2003 by Mohammed VI, King of Morocco, to the Somerset County Park Commission.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 15.28 miles (24.59 km) of roadways, of which 9.70 miles (15.61 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.59 miles (4.17 km) by Somerset County and 2.99 miles (4.81 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides service at the Far Hills train station on the Gladstone Branch of the Morristown Line; the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is located at U.S. Route 202, near the intersection of Far Hills Road, one half mile east of U.S. Route 206, offering service via Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station or to Hoboken Terminal.

Lakeland Bus Lines provides Route 78 rush-hour service from Bedminster to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.


Far Hills, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.